Thursday, April 14, 2011

Horticultural Field-Trip, part 2

Naturally when you get a group of crazy plant people together awareness of meaningless things, like the time of day, ceases. Thus when leaving Bovees Nursery we had to make a critical decision where to head next and unfortunately realized we weren’t going to make it to Joy Creek Nursery as we had planned, there was only time for one more stop and Cistus it was. Luckily we arrived before Sean had left so we got to stroll through the greenhouses before shopping the retail area. Above Sean Hogan and Ryan Miller are discussing the merits of this beautiful plant, which of course I failed to get the name of...(*update* Justin Galicic identifies it as Pittosporum tenuifolium a.k.a. Kohuhu) Ficus carica, love the huge leaves on this one. Ledebouria 'Gary Hammer' Cute huh? Check out this beautiful vine, Tetrastigma voinierianum. Bright green with orange fuzz, the bad news? Not hardy here in Portland (zone 8) This is Brodie, one of the hardest working dogs in horticulture. And a couple gorgeous plants that I don’t have the name of. Call it “anonymous plant lust”… Beautiful Podophyllums. Impatiens omeiana (I believe) Ribes roezlii Euphorbia x pasteurii 'John Phillips' (serious plant lust!!!) Dunce cap Daffodils (NOT their real name) I think this is a Banksia, but don’t trust me on that, the underside… And the top, of the leaves. I’m not the only one who’s cutting back on the Phormiums. The next generation of Manzanita’s rooting (there is a Manzanita here for practically everyone in Portland!) And the toddlers (a little further along in their development…)Other treasures in propagation. It was getting later and I for one had a little shopping to do. Time to head to the retail area, where I finally met an Edgeworthia worth owning, Edgeworthia chrysantha 'Akebono'… And found a blooming Echium to stare at. I finally noticed this little oddity. Do you prefer your variegated Echiums in two tone green? Or green and yellow? Heck have them both on the same plant! And of course the bloom spike follows… Not to be outdone there were some sweet Grevillea blooms too. And the color on these Mahonia berries was gorgeous, way better than in this photo. Wandering the nursery also turned up two new (to me) possibilities for my empty spot in the front garden (where the Camellia was). More research is needed but at first glance these are both knock-outs! Lonicera periclymenum 'Honeybush Improved' And Decaisnea fargesii, or Blue Bean Tree. Of course the Lonicera periclymenum has dark foliage, which I should be avoiding since we are going with a chocolate brown house color. By now the sun was getting low in the sky, providing beautiful light, but reminding us it was time to go. But not before I buy a Loquat!!! I was eyeing one of the big bushy 5-gallon ones on the right. But my shopping partners reminded me that the smaller 2-gallon one on the left was a better deal and would quickly grow up…how often do I listen to the voice of reason? Rarely. They should take it as a complement that I did right?

15 comments:

  1. I really wanted that Lonicera and regretted not buying it! I asked Derick to bring one to the sale but he couldn't find it and they were pretty busy getting ready.

    Great pics, they remind me of all the crazy wonderful stuff we saw, way to much to remember myself.

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  2. I think that first mystery plant is an Oleria, I bought a holly leaved species.

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  3. Ryan, I guess you'll have to plan another visit soon (to get the Lonicera), perhaps a field-trip with the family is in order. Thanks for the mystery plant id!

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  4. How nice that your pals were looking out for you. The Loquat and the Podophyllum are must-haves in my book. Not that I have any room for them...

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  5. Oh those echium!!! Want! But mine never flower for me... :(

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  6. gorgeous Echium - love the variety of variegation...say THAT quickly 5 times!

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  7. What?! Road trip companions who counsel reason? Mine always prod me into greater rashness...but the only time I feel sorry is when I leave a great find behind.

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  8. I need a Loquat too, but it worries me slightly that I see it seemingly under shelter in your pic. Linda has that Decaisnea fargesii - did you see her Posterous picture week or so ago? It's very cool and in your pic it looks even bluer! Pretty color of grevillea, too - did it go home with you?

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  9. Great post, Loree...I still can't decide which was more breathtaking...the Echium blooms or those Mahonia berries...seriously...just fab! I don't think I've ever really cared for Podophyllums I've seen in area gardens...but those made me really, REALLY lust after them. I'm sure I can convince my Rodgersias to share their bed, right???

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  10. I'd be willing to bet those first two pics are actually Pittosporum tenuifolium a.k.a. Kohuhu. Both look pretty similar.

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  11. Justin, you are right on that plant id. I think there was another Oleria nearby with smaller leaves but similar looking leaves. When I asked about the one in the pic and Sean said it was Pittosporum I remember being surprised.

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  12. Wow, for some reason I thought there wouldn't be much blooming up in OR this month yet. I mean normally, not just this year. It's looking good!

    P.S. I don't have it on me right now, but the April Sunset mag has an article with new plants for 2011 and one is a really cool dark green aloe with white scribble striping I bet you'd love... *hinthint*

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  13. Grace, room? Who worries about room?

    Greensparrow, can you even imagine living in a place where they are in flower everywhere!? (San Francisco) what a wonderful reality.

    Lauren, I did...what do I win?

    ricki, I know it was quite unusual. Perhaps that is why I actually listened to them.

    MulchMaid, Sean assures me that Loquat are most certainly hardy here in Portland. He even gave me the location of a super old and big one to go check out (which I haven't yet done). These were grouped together outside of one of their garden pavilions. I think probably leaning up against the wall to keep them from blowing over in the wind. I did see Linda's post and will hope she shares more pictures as it progresses though the season...and no, that Grevillea didn't come home with me...but I think Ryan may have grabbed it.

    Scott, most certainly you can! And I agree about both the berries and the Echium.

    Justin, thank you for the id...I bet that you are right! As does Ryan.

    Mary, oh gosh...maybe my Sunset will show up today and I can see what you're talking about!

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  14. I need to get something to wipe the drool up after seeing that red/orange Edgeworthia.

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  15. It is so interesting to see plants I never see here--except the Pittosporum which is reasonably common, and Loquat--did you get the fruiting or strictly ornamental variety?

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