Thursday, August 30, 2018

The Mangaves, where are they now?

Back in May 2017 I shared photos of a box of Mangaves that arrived on my doorstep. They were tiny little plants, plug-size, the roots not even filling a 2" pot. Since I don't live in an ideal Mangave climate, and I don't have a greenhouse, I felt a little apprehensive about celebrating them too much (were they gonna make it?). And in fact I immediately sent a few of the smallest, weakest, on to friends in warmer climates — there was no way they'd have lived a happy life here. However, a year and almost four months later, some of the haul are doing great, and I thought this a good time for an update. As a reminder, these beauties all came from Hans Hansen at Walters Gardens in Michigan...

The three Mangave 'Inkblot' were planted out in a container in the front garden, at the base of a Bougainvillea. I left the whole lot in place over winter and while the Bougainvillea died, the Managaves did not. I am thrilled.

When it came time to update the Agave dish planters (June 2017) I made use of what plants I had on hand, that meant at least one Mangave per dish.

Here's Mangave 'Man of Steel' ( Agave striata and x Mangave 'Bloodspot' mix) it just keeps getting better and better...

If my records are correct then this Magave is M. 'Catch a Wave' —  a cross between Agave gypsophila, Agave colorata, and Manfreda maculosa.

The last planter has a pair of Mangaves: M, 'Bad Hair Day' and another M. 'Catch a Wave'...

Here's 'Bad Hair Day'...

And 'Catch a Wave'...

Mangave 'Moonglow' (in the tall black pot) is the offspring of x Mangave 'Bloodspot' and Manfreda undulata 'Chocolate Chips'...

It's looking good, but really in too much shade and I should move it to a sunnier spot.

This three-some was the result of my not knowing how to creatively pot up all of the Mangave riches. I really need to break them up.


There's a pair of Mangave 'Purple People Eater' which "combines the architectural Agave gypsophila, the smaller Agave macroacantha, and purple freckling from the manfreda side of the family."

An a Mangave 'Silver Fox' — "a combination of Agave gypsophila, Agave macroacantha, and a nameless Manfreda."

Yes I really do need to give this trio a little love.

Here's the final bit of the Mangave haul...

Mangave 'Lavender Lady', who's parents are Agave attenuata and x Mangave 'Bloodspot'...

The Agave attenuata parentage shines through loudly.

This adorable little fellow is Mangave 'Carnival'...

"This sport of 'Jaguar' has the opposite variegation of the equally beautiful 'Kaleidoscope'. Long, lance-shaped leaves are dark green with wide, creamy yellow centers. Newer leaves have chartreuse centers. A smattering of subtle, light red spots dot the leaves, giving a blush tone to the leaves. Its brilliant coloration makes a great specimen in a container." (all quoted descriptions come from Walters Gardens)

That's the Mangave report. Here's hoping next year I will be sharing photos of even bigger plants.

Weather Diary, Aug 29: Hi 85, Low 66/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

22 comments:

  1. They're all looking beautiful. Were the Inkblots the only ones that overwintered outside? I have to admit many of the ones with purple freckles all start to look alike to me. 'Lavender Lady' and "Carnival' are probably my favorites. There are a few at Plant Delights that I might get around to ordering soon, I'm just not sure how much room I have in the greenhouse this winter.

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    1. Yep, only the Inkblots were outside, winter knocked them back a bit, but they recovered quite quickly!

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  2. I think they're looking great, too, considering you can't just leave them outside in the winter like I do!

    I need to do a mangave update, too.....

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    1. OH that I could leave them outside...

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  3. Alison beat me to it...I've never found them terribly appealing...but Lavender Lady catches my eye :-) The pot certainly shows them off to their best advantage, too.

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    1. It was pure luck that whatever I had in that container previously died and left it available!

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  4. These all look healthy and gorgeous and show well in the various containers. Beautiful!

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  5. You've got quite the collection! I've become increasingly fond of these plants myself, as witnessed by the fact that I recently doubled the size of my small collection by adding 3 mail order plants. (There are still almost none of these plants available in the local garden centers I frequent, which is annoying.) I find it interesting that your 'Silver Fox' and 'Lavender Lady' present as looser in appearance than my own stiff-looking specimens. Speculating, I wonder if that's because mine are in more sun.

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    1. Yes definitely (the sun), back when we were all sun all the time (and temps regularly in the 90's) the leaves were more upright. I think they're saying "What!? Where did the sun go!" and trying to get as much surface area exposed as possible.

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  6. The colors and patterns on this species are so beautiful. I've now and then seen a Zone 5 variety but decided it was not worth the chance. Still . . .

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  7. Wowza! I had no idea there were so many Mangaves... And I most definitely didn't know that you could cross them with Agave attenuata! Spotty goodness aside, I love the silky sheen of that one. Just fabulous!
    ~ Anna K

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    1. All Mangaves are crosses! "Mangave is a relatively new phenomenon, as a cross between the genus Manfreda and Agave. These rare hybrids combine the best of both worlds: the better growth rate and the interesting patterns of Manfreda, and the habit and refinement of Agave."

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  8. They're wonderful and I'm really impressed with the three that survived outside all winter.

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    1. Me too, I wonder if I'll be brave enough to leave them outside this winter?

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  9. Well done Loree! I'm going to be putting a couple more of mine in the ground during my fall planting season. More will be moved up to larger pots.I got all but two of them at the UC Davis plant sale last year and this years plant sale is coming up so I hope to score a few more.

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    1. I look forward to seeing what you find!

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  10. We ordered a bunch from Plant Delights this spring, and I've been really impressed with how they are doing. They fit in really well in Texas. Not sure what we will do with them this winter. Probally will move them into the barely heated greenhouse. While over all winter is pleasant, it can get really cold for short bursts. Thanks for sharing your beautiful collection!

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    1. You're smart to be thinking about winter protection. All it takes is one cold night to put a big dent in your collection.

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  11. Wow! My favorite is Mangave 'Lavender Lady'. I'll hopefully be adding that to my garden someday. Mangaves certainly have made a splash over the last year or so.

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  12. Moonglow is fetching, spilling over the black pot...and oh, that beauty (NOID) behind and to the right of it!
    rickii

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