Friday, August 24, 2018

Visiting Dan Hinkley's Windcliff Part Two: the back garden

It just so happens I toured Monrovia Nursery on Tuesday, as some of you may know Dan Hinkley has a collection of plants at Monrovia. Why am I telling you this (other than to let you know there will be a post on Monrovia at some point in the future?) because my visit to this garden was still fresh enough in my head that I could place some of the plants he talked about in his garden. And I was confused. He calls this section of the garden the front, because it faces Puget Sound. To me it was the back, because it's the second side of the house/garden which you visit. Either way, it's amazing...

Another restio, who's name I do not remember.

Here's the one you see multiple times in the garden, Rhodocoma capensis.

Looking back over my shoulder...

A reminder this garden is graced by it's proximity to Puget Sound. It's got to be at least a USDA Zone 9 (Acacia pravissima).

Remember what I said yesterday about the Agapanthus?

I should know what that bright green business is.
Yes I should.

And this too.

Finally a slice of the Sound comes into view...

Dierama pulcherrimum, angels fishing rod.

Seeds...

And the seed pods of more bloomed Phormium.

The first glance of the back/front of the house.

If you had a view of Puget Sound (Seattle and Mt. Rainier visible on a clear day) wouldn't you want a couple of nice mature Pacific Madrones to frame it?

You can just barely make out a bit of the Seattle skyline under the first group of clouds (on the left) in the distance.

I loved the over-planted feel of this garden, the fact you couldn't move through it (especially this section) without brushing up against the plants. At times it was hard to tell where the path led.

You could see things (like the house) off in the distance, but weren't sure how to get there.

But everywhere you looked (and walked) there were fabulous plants in front of you.

And on each side...

I finally made my way over to a paved clearing, which led to the house.

If you turned back you were still in the midst of the plantings.

But you no longer felt like you weren't ever going to find your way out again (a delicious feeling, for a bit).

I knew there was a large Agave up near the house, it was thrilling to see it with my own eyes.

I believe it's A. salmiana ferox...

What a twisty Arctostaphylos.

This felt a little too close, like I was invading their personal space.

Not that I stopped, no, I wanted to see all the plants! I was careful to avert my eyes from the windows though.

That wasn't too difficult, with so much to see...

Right about here Dan came shooting out of the house to follow-up on a plant I'd asked about. Camera in hand I was paranoid for a moment he was going to ask me to stop taking photos. No worries though, instead we talked about how quickly the pod on this palm flower bursts open.

And how great the dried pod is for arrangements.

It was time to make my way back around front and to the neighbor's garden, which was also open for the afternoon and where my friends were waiting for me.

What a wonderful garden this was, do visit if you can...

Weather Diary, Aug 23: Hi 74, Low 59/ Precip: trace (a light mist for about 15 minutes)

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

30 comments:

  1. I like this side of the garden much more than the other. Interesting that it is as full of unusual plants but it feels more personal. More large open/paved space than I would have imagined. And all those different Agapanthus are breathtaking. Love the way the table etc. was right by the house and so enclosed by the plants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would have liked to spend more time standing on the deck and surveying the garden from that angle, maybe next time.

      Delete
  2. Such an amazing garden full of fabulous plants and integrated artwork. I love getting lost in this plant playground and learning about new plants. Thanks for more memories of this special day. Did you see the two outside showers on the sides of the house with stone floors by Jeffrey Bales?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Photo 28 shows the purple Indigofera pendula. If I could grow one plant in this garden, it would be that one. Tried and it died. Also I love that rock-encrusted fire pit/gathering area. Wow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah come on Grace, don't you know the "3 times" rule? You can't truly declare a plant unhappy in your garden unless you've killed it three times, give it another go...

      Delete
  4. The 'bright green business' = Elegia capensis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hooray! That's what I was going to guess.

      Delete
  5. There's always much of a muchness in any Dan Hinkley garden, all of it well grown and most of it rare and unusual. This makes the Agapanthus doubly refreshing: eye-catching repetition that ties things together and something familiar and recognizable to give the mind a rest. (Though I'm sure DH's varieties are choice.)

    That Restio looks like a Marcia Donohue creation! Surely one inspired by it is in the works, if not already in the garden...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love to see how Marcia Donahue would interpret that plant!

      Delete
  6. So enjoyed these posts! And very glad that Dan found the sun he craved, after Heronswood being mostly a shade garden. He seems to be making the most of it!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wow! Thanks so much for sharing...this is definitely on my bucket list now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a wonderful place to visit.

      Delete
  8. Thanks for sharing your visit, Loree. It must have been a wonderful tour for a plant lover like yourself, especially. Wow, that view his garden has. And I love the fire pit overlooking it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I can't imagine a view like that, I wouldn't ever get anything done.

      Delete
  9. This post makes me want to add Agapanthus to my own garden, despite the fact that I already have gobs of them! I don't have anything in that deep dark blue color, though, and your photos show how great they look with a smoke tree so that even gives me an idea where I could put more. Thanks for the wonderful posts, Loree!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're so welcome, and I love that your the (seemingly) rare SoCal gardener who actually sees the merits of the Agapanthus.

      Delete
  10. I think "front" or "second" or whatever doesn't say enough. The other side should be the "great" garden, and this one should be the "amazing" one. Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wow. Although I recognize very few plants (angel fishing rod...), it's a delight to my eyes. The view of the sound is a knock out. Agapanthus and smoke bush look so good together. The fire pit is one of the best I've seen, and there's a Danger Gardenette too...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OMG! I wish I would have thought to call it that. You're right though, a danger gardenette, Dan's tribute to me! (hahahaha)

      Delete
  12. Oh, man, so much to see! I have so much zone envy. And I am obsessed with the combo of purple cotinus & agapanthus. Who would have thought that blue/purple & burgundy/purple would pair so well?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right? It's a winning combination.

      Delete
  13. And to think that was all designed and planted one at a time. Astounding vision.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would love to see the process.

      Delete
  14. Wowza! Wish I could visit!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can! Next summer. Come on up.

      Delete
  15. I need to visit during agapanthus season! Wow! I always love seeing this garden any time of year, though. I love it. Garden space unrestricted by lawn. I wish I'd been allowed to do that in my current garden. Next time!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to comment. Comment moderation is on (because you know: spam), I will approve and post your comment as soon as possible!