Friday, October 13, 2017

Tour 2017, the back garden

Yesterday we made it as far as the Agave-gate, now it's time to enter the back garden...

The fabulously long-lived Phormium to the right...(it's survived two PKWs in its history)...

Stepping further in we see the area where I shoved a big pot of Canna and a Eupatorium capillifolium 'Elegant Feather' — when my Grevillea victoriae up and died in July.

I've really enjoyed them, along with the long suffering (previously forgotten) Musa basjoo.

Walking further down the path and looking northwest...

Turning north...

The Trachycarpus fortunei trunk, and it's "adornments" were a summer highlight. The Passiflora lutea and Bomarea sp. will both die back this autumn. The deeply cut, thin, foliage on the left belongs to Grevillea 'Ivanhoe' and the large leaves on the right to Rhododendron sinogrande.

Turning back towards the path and the shade pavilion in the distance (roughly southwest).

As I mentioned in September's favorites post these dish planters are going to have to come inside soon, and at some point that Agave will get lifted, as it's not a hardy one here in Portland.

Wider view...

The side of our garage, which really is level, bad photo angle!

The Syneilesis aconitifolia (shredded umbrella plant) had a good year.

Stepping back to look at the patio straight on.

And now on the steps, looking left (southwest)...

And right (northwest)...

What ugly garage?

Love this view so much!

It's kind of odd to be sharing photos of the huge container collection now, since I just wrote about taking many of them into the basement.

How much longer can I let the Agave ovatifolia live in that container? I can't imagine trying to free it. Please pardon the chicken wire behind the stock tank pond. Stupid EVIL raccoons.

Looking east, at the back of the house.

And towards the shade pavilion/back of the garage...Clifford (our big leaf Magnolia) watches over it all...

The chartreuse Circle Pot, 2017 version.

Southeast corner of the patio.

Soon this structure will be enclosed and become a "greenhouse" of sorts. Hopefully it won't look like the "now" version in this post (here) again anytime soon!

My Bromeliad collection increased substantially this summer. I hope I can find room for them all in the house!

For example I need to lift both of the containers inside the metal tubes.

But the ferns will all stay in place (for better or worse).

A few more "tenders" that will have to be moved.

I'm going to miss hanging out here!

Looking from the shade pavilion out towards the patio and beyond.

And now walking towards the upper lawn area.

Looking northeast.

And towards the Bromeliad trellis next to the garage (which later became populated with a few Sarracenia).

Finally a couple of parting shots looking up at my favorite blue blue sky, with a increasing canopy of my own trees.

Summer 2017 was wonderful!

Weather Diary, Oct 12: Hi 56, Low 46/ Precip .5"

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

30 comments:

  1. Clifford is magnificent! My own bigleaf Magnolia had a good summer too, but it will be a long time before she looks like yours. She still looks a lot like a mop stuck in the ground.

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    1. Time will go fast. I remember thinking Clifford would never bloom...

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  2. I loved being treated to a virtual tour of your fabulous garden. You must go out there and pinch yourself to make sure it isn't a dream. Your favorite view with the A. ovatifolia is terrific, although all the views look terrific to me. In line with your 'What were they thinking?" posts, do you every look at all of those tender plants you have and ask yourself "What was I thinking?" :)
    I know I think that when I walk outdoors every migration season.......

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    1. Actually yes, sometimes I do think it's a dream. And then winter comes ;) ....

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  3. I can see why the sunny, warm summer is so precious. It looks to have been a great growing year; thanks for the tour.

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    1. It was! And yes... the time I get to spend outside in the garden is the best time.

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  4. What will you do with the fern table for winter? You've got a nice rhythm on the side of the garage. The wall planters and tall containers make it mush less obvious that it is a flat area.

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    1. I tried to select ferns, and other plants, that were super hardy...I plan to leave the table in place. I've seen them over winter at Joy Creek Nursery and pop out of it fine in the spring. Of course I may need to do a little "refresh"...

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  5. Far to many beautiful plants to even start to highlight one. Your garden continues to amaze me.

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  6. All of summer has been a crescendo leading up to this! WOW!

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    1. Sadly now on the downward slide...

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  7. Clifford sure has grown. Your garden looks great.

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    1. Thank you, and yes...he's a big boy now!

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  8. Outstanding garden, Loree - wow!

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  9. I am in so awe of your design, creativity and eye for style! And of course, for being a plant warrior to try new things and pair everyone with such satisfaction. Just gorgeous all around and so many ideas to collect.

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    1. Thanks Linda...come visit sometime!

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  10. I'm so impressed, Loree. You have a zillion plants but somehow you've arranged them in a way that allows each one to shine. Even your Albizia, a plant that usually causes me to cringe, looks great. I remain envious of your various Yucca rostratas - I've yet to find one locally and may be required to resort to mail order. How long will it take a plant in a 4-inch pot to reach maturity I wonder?

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    1. In your climate you may experience success with a 4" pot, but I would encourage you to start with something bigger. The biggest you can find. You could always take a road trip to Portland!

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  11. These pictures should sustain you through winter. They are magnificent. I can't even pick a favorite. Does Rhododendron sinogrande bloom? Yucca rostrata is the back garden has quite a trunk: how many years does it take to grow such a huge specimen?

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  12. So beautiful, thank you for sharing the photos!

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  13. Your plants all look so healthy and happy! You have a fantastic design sense. And your execution of it is flawless. Have fun with the plant migration!

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  14. Beautiful is right!! Love Clifford so much!

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  15. So glad you had a fine summer. With all the new additions, fern tables, bromeliads, the DG looks better than ever, and I didn't think that was possible! And that chocolate mimosa looks about as happy there as any I've seen.

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  16. Loree, do you have concerns/plans for the growth of shade in your garden ? I have a constant struggle with that , and most of it comes from either my house(which is 2 story) and the neighbors trees, neither of which are under my control.

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  17. Thanks for the tour - so many great views! Your patio still looks as great as I remember it.

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