Monday, October 16, 2017

October 2017 Garden Bloggers Bloomday

For those of you who play by the rules, yesterday, October 15th, was actually Garden Bloggers Bloomday. I'm late...c'est la vie! If you haven't already done so visit May Dreams Gardens for links to all the bloggers who posted for Bloomday.

To kick things off here's one of my traditional late summer/early autumn flowers, Clematis tibetana var. vernayi. Unlike some of the more fancy-pants Clematis I've purchased recently this one just keeps on blooming, year after year, no matter what. Thank you.

Next to it is Schefflera delavayi, getting its bloom on...

Another Aralia, or at least a cross with an Aralia, x Fatshedera lizei 'Annemieke'. First with the fall color of a Virginia Creeper...

And a close-up.

The Mahonia...this one is M. fortunei 'Curlyque'...

M. x media 'Charity'

It's just getting started.

M. eurybracteata 'Soft Caress'

Not a flower — but just as bright — the ripening fruit of the Poncirus trifoliata.

A first for blooms, Leucosceptrum japonicum 'Mountain Madness'.

Ditto (a first) flowers on my Impatiens omeiana.

Abutilon Nuabyell

Couldn't resist doing a shot looking up.

Once again the Tetrapanax papyrifer begins its race to bloom before the first frost...who will win? The Tetrapanax, or Mr. Frost?

Persicaria microcephala ‘Red Dragon’, which has faded to green.

NOID Rosemary, which has been blooming forever!

The end of the Bougainvillea × buttiana 'Barbara Karst' flowers.

Ditto for the Hesperaloe parviflora, but don't tell that to the hummingbird that still keeps visiting it every single day.

There must still be goodness in there, because she works the whole thing over, sits in the Edgeworthia for a bit and rests, and then starts all over again.

Nicotiana (not the one I thought I was buying, but very florific) and Bomarea sp. — notice how they're trying to win me over to the combination of orange and pink...

NOID Canna...

I've been trying to get a shot like this all summer. I love the way the orange Anigozanthos looks with the Brachyglottis greyi (Senecio greyi). It's still not exactly what my eye sees, but it's the closest I've gotten.

Right now, when they fade to this dark purple color (with bits of fuchsia) is the only time I appreciate the neighbor's Hydrangea, which grow next to our driveway.

Finally a NOID succulent that recently came inside for warmer temps and less rain. It's getting a little respite by the kitchen sink, since it's blooming. Happy October Bloomday!

Weather Diary, Oct 15: Hi 67, Low 38/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

21 comments:

  1. I wondered where you were yesterday! I can appreciate a rule breaker. I have a wimpy Clematis along the back fence that never blooms, maybe I should switch it out and put in a C. tibetana.

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    1. I'm really kind of bummed that my brief flirtation with Clematis ended so poorly.

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  2. The color on that Hydrangea is amazing. We can't really grow blues here; too alkaline. And I can hardly bear to look at your Mahonias. If ever there was a plant that has it all, she's the one. Love them, lust after them, still can't find a zone 5 variety. Maybe someday.

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    1. Plain ol' Oregon Grape (Mahonia aquifolium) is hardy to Zone 5.

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  3. One benefit of your part of the world is the growing season is much longer--hence, you have outdoor blooms a greater portion of the year. Alas, we have not had a frost yet (last night was close), so the growing season continues. Yay. I wasn't aware of that Clematis cultivar--it's wonderful! I agree with Linda about the Mahonias--I didn't know much about them until traveling and seeing them in various warmer climates than ours. They are fabulous!

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    1. Beth I don't know how you do it! I couldn't stand a shorter growing season. Gardeners like you are much tougher than I am.

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  4. The citrus fruit is quite amazing. Will you/can you do anything with it?
    I'm pretty sure both Mahonia Charity and Soft Caress in my garden are far behind yours, as they are every year, but I don't mind waiting.

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    1. Last year I ate one of the cistrus, I had to! Not so good. They make a lovely decor accent...and smell good to!

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  5. Oh my, looking up Nuabyell's skirt - shocking! The orange and grey combination in the third from the last picture is really cool. This fall thing isn't so bad when your garden is filled with such gems.

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    1. And when the sun shines. The sunny days sprinkled in with the rainy ones definitely help keep my spirits up.

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  6. As usual, you have flowers I've never heard of! I looked up 'Mountain Madness', only to discover that it probably wouldn't accept my zone or its dry conditions. Your post also sent me stalking outside to see if there was any evidence of flowers developing on the Mahonia 'charity' I planted last year. Nada. Of course, it probably feels more like July than October to my Mahonia.

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    1. It will be interesting to see when your Mahonia blooms. I can't believe you don't even have buds yet.

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  7. I have Impatiens omeana blooms for the first time this month too. A nice surprise. But you have way more still blooming than I have, though like you, I have my Mahonias. That's very fitting for Oregon. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. It's so curious we're both experiencing I. omeana blooms for the first time.

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  8. With all that wonderful beauty it is OK to be a day late!

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  9. Didn't know those Impatiens were bloomers. Now this is the second time I've seen them. You always come up with the most unusual and intrigueing in whatever you do.

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    1. Aren't they all? Bloomers I mean...

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  10. Oh you have such flowers that i don't see much in others'posts from the temperate climes. I hope they don't succumb to frost sooner!

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  11. How do you over winter you Anigozanthos? I had a yellow/orange a few yrs ago and it didn't make it through the winter indoors....

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  12. Didn't know you could grow Bougainvillea in Portland.

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