Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Wednesday Vignette; "then and now"

Then, August 2015

Now, January 2017

Weather Diary, January 10: Hi 38, Low 31/ Precip .35" rain + too much snow (not sure what the total was at midnight, guessing about 4")

Wednesday Vignettes are hosted by Anna at Flutter & Hum. All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

28 comments:

  1. I can't imagine how this will effect your garden! I am not dealing with our unexpected hard hard freeze! My yard looks like a war zone getting worse each day!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I know you hate the snow, but good grief Loree - I think it's beautiful! Besides, your garden has such good bones, it still looks good when covered in that white, fluffy stuff. I like how the orange pots inside, along with the pavilion structure, glow warmly in all the white. If it brings you down, remember that snow is a fabulous insulator! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am a little jealous of those that see beauty and enjoy the snow. As for those bones? They're lost in the piles of white.

      Delete
  3. It's so lovely at your house. We got 5 flakes and now it's going to get really cold again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lovely isn't the word I would chose. It's a freaking disaster area. But I suppose on the screen it looks different...

      Delete
  4. Oh my! I thought of you when I heard the news report that Portland had gotten a blanket of snow. Still, your garden looks good even decorated in white. The decision to paint that pavilion orange was brilliant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Kris, I am still quite happy with our color choice!

      Delete
  5. It's a crazy contrast. I'm demoralized at all the soft, leafy evergreens that are down in my garden. The only upside is possible new planting space?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's hard to think of loosing plants we selected and nurtured along, hoping to see them mature. But yes, I suppose plant shopping is the upside.

      Delete
  6. That is quite a transformation. I hope all of your plants are okay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Phillip, me too! And believe what you're hearing...this is not normal.

      Delete
  7. I can imagine that it's really impossible to see any beauty there when you know what it's doing to your garden. We're at the end of day 2 of freezing rain. Our driveway is a skating rink. Tried to put down sand and salt but it's not helping much; bad weather everywhere.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Yikes ! I don't have the wardrobe for that stuff. Got me a couple pair of rain boots though .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I set out before bed with Lila in the same ankle high "sloggers" I've been wearing all winter. Nope. Snow was too deep. Had to haul out the tall boots. Thank god I'm a compulsive scarf and glove collector. Now if I just believed in socks!

      Delete
  9. You live in Alaska now?? I'm so sorry for you and your garden's loss! Although if anyone can make a garden look cool (...not in the temp sense) again, it would be you! 💪💪

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It certainly feels that way! (Alaska)...thanks for the kind words Jenn, they did make me smile.

      Delete
  10. That is insane. I hope your marginal plants survive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Alison, me too. And the woody evergreens that are all bent too and fro...

      Delete
  11. Looks like that second photo was taking in the snowy regions of northern Japan, not Portland........ :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrew had the same reaction when I showed the photos to him.

      Delete
  12. I'm not too far away... in Canby. I tried an Agave Ovatifolia this year. It was seriously damaged, if not fatally so, when the teen temps hit... even before any snow or ice. I now consider it a total goner. Was I foolish? Is a frost cloth necessary? I thought these could take some cold. On the other hand, my JC Raulston is looking like a champ. Both came from Blooming Junction.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You weren't foolish, in my experience Agave ovatifolia is one of the best for our climate. Mine have been through a lot. I'm guessing maybe there wasn't sufficient "drainage enablers" mixed into the soil? And it had soaked up too much autumn rain? What is your soil like? Did you plant it raised a bit from the surrounding ground? Good to know your JC is looking good. I still can't see mine!

      Delete
    2. Drainage is very good in Canby silty loam with gravel mulch, in a 8" raised bed edged with rocks. Never ever does water stand or pool. I even planted the rootball a half inch over the soil line and then backfilled with gravel.
      You put some protection over yours didn't you? I may try this variety again next year but not without some protection.
      I'll be interested to see how your Agaves fare at the end of this brutal winter. I'd love to see another April Agave review this year.

      Delete
    3. I did put some protection over them for this round of snow, and for the ice storm before it. But the earlier snow and ice, in December, they got nothing. Same for last year's January snow and ice, nothing. We shall see. And yes, I'm sure I'll be doing an Agave update this spring. Although it will probably be very depressing.

      Delete
  13. The Weather God moved my garden to Crescent City this year--and yours to...Mount Hood? Crazy, indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, judging by the number of skiers on our street, Mt. Hood sounds about right.

      Delete

Thank you for taking the time to comment. Comment moderation is on (because you know: spam), I will approve and post your comment as soon as possible!