Saturday, October 15, 2016

October 2016 Garden Blogger's Bloomday

It's Garden Blogger's Bloomday for October 2016! I took these photos (well most of them) on the 12th, fully intending to post early. Why? Laziness, no desire to post on a Saturday if I didn't have to. Plus SUNSHINE! With predictions of a major wind and rainstorm to hit on the 13th (and last for the foreseeable future) I decided to strike while the iron was hot, or something like that. For links to other bloggers participating this October visit May Dreams Gardens.

Most of these blooms are ones you've seen before, such is my garden in October. Abutilon 'Nuabyell'

Abutilon 'Nuabtang'

And Abutilon megapotamicum 'Red'.

Schefflera brevipedunculata

And without the lens-flare.

The Schefflera delavayi blooms were more upright until the last rainstorm beat them down.

Truth be told I cut them off right after taking this photo. Each one was at least two and a half-feet long, couldn't have them bending the plant over

Tetrapanax papyrifer, fist-like buds.

χ Fatshedera lizei ‘Annemieke’ — out of focus but I loved them with the red vine behind...

Only slightly more in focus.

Fatsia japonica, and if you're sensing these last 4 are all plart of the same family you'd be right — the Araliaceae.

And now the Mahonia, first up M. x media 'Charity' .

M. fortunei 'Curlyque'

M. eurybracteata 'Soft Caress'

And another M. eurybracteata 'Soft Caress', this photo taken after the rains had started but I wanted to include it because I'm so happy with how good this plant is finally looking!

Panicum virgatum 'Cheyenne Sky'

Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola'

As beautiful as they are I find it incredibly difficult to photograph the seed heads of Chasmanthium latifolium (aka Northern sea oats).

These, left over in a vase from September 5th, are much easier to focus on.

Another hard to photograph-well "bloomer," the Rosemary. This one sprawling around the front garden.

The Euonymus nanus var. turkestanicus seed pods have turned pink and their little orange seeds are dangling below. It's a quite lovely, not that you could tell from this image.

That's my crazy happy Acacia dealbata (and a Fir tree), it's covered in tiny buds...I wonder if winter will let it bloom? (mild = yes, not so mild = the whole thing may be cut down)

Dicliptera suberecta, almost open.

My love for these tiny Correa backhouseana flowers just keeps growing.

How cute are they?

The Grevillea victoriae 'Murray Queen' is covered in buds and a few open blossoms even, none that I maaged to get in focus though.

The Magnolia laevifolia has shot upwards this year, and has a few flower buds opening towards the top.

Leucadendron 'Jester' — coloring up as though to bloom.

Foliage madness! (yes, I know this is a Bloomday post but I couldn't help but include this shot as a nod to tomorrow's Foliage Follow-up over on Digging)

Clematis tibetana var. vernayi — which was scheduled to be removed (too vigorous) but may have earned a stay of execution. I cut it back hard last winter and it was much more manageable this year. And I love those flowers!

This one's not mine, but rather our neighbor's — a blooming Musa basjoo — which can be seen from the window of our second bedroom. There are even tiny little bananas forming.

And finally, Passiflora 'Aphrodites Purple Nightie'...an unexpected treat as I was winding up my Bloomday photography (I miss the sunshine already)...

All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

33 comments:

  1. A wonderful parade of blooms! I'm wondering how big a Schefflera delavayi needs to get before it starts to flower. Mine is getting pretty big, but no sign of flowers yet. Maybe net year?

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    1. I wish I had an answer for you Alison. Mine has been flowering for a few years now.

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  2. I'm with you on missing the sun already! The rain keeps pouring and the wind is picking up. Hope all of your flowers and foliage make it through the storm unscathed! Happy GBBD!

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    1. It's a mess out there, but everything looks to be okay. At one point I was pretty sure I was going to see the Tetrapanax get ripped out and fly down the street.

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  3. This is such a great time of year in the garden, with tropicals and subtropicals still going strong. Love that first abutilon, and my own Tetrapanax 'Steroidal Giant' looks like it's going to bloom this year (if frost doesn't nip it first). But I'm very surprised to see your rosemary blooming; this is a winter/early spring bloomer here in Washington, DC.

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    1. That Rosemary is absolutely covered in flowers, it always catches me by surprise.

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  4. Oh, to be able to grow Mahonia! I like the lens flare with those dotty seedheads (or are they flowers).

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    1. They're buds about to burst into flowers.

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  5. Those Correa blooms are very cute !

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  6. You have the coolest plants and coolest garden of anyone I know.

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    1. Ah Kylee, what a sweet thing to say!

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  7. Your zone 8 is not my zone 8; sunny and dry here. Love the Passiflora at the end. We used to call them Maypops when we found them in a field.

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    1. I'm jealous. Definitely not either sunny or dry here. Is it just one type of Passiflora that is referred to as Maypops? Or all?

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  8. I'm struggling with frustration as the wind is keeping me inside and preventing me from planting. So much to do. I'm going to be hard at work next week, rain or shine. Those little Sputnik blooms on all the Araliaceae members are so cute. You got a few things I neglected to photograph in my own garden, Hakonechloa, Chasmanthium, and Dicliptera. Love the buds on 'Murray Valley Queen'. I'm so excited for my Grevilleas to grow up and be covered in buds and blooms. I went crazy this summer and now have 8!

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    1. You sent me looking at my plant list (on the blog). What a history I have with Grevilleas. I've now lost 4 different "in ground" plants. The multiple G. juniperina due to cold (winter of 2013/14) but the other two for no apparent reason.

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  9. In the foliage shot, was it loquat in the background? Does it fruit?
    The Correa backhouseana flowers are adorable. Love that little skull cap they have on.

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    1. Yes that's a Loquat and I did get fruit this year.

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  10. Wonderful post, enjoyed all your interesting flowers. The 'Curlyque' foliage is even better than the brilliant yellow of the flowers.

    Just got a Correa of my own--hopefully it survives the drought.

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    1. And I'm hoping mine (the Correa) survives this winter.

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  11. As usual, there's a lot to love in your post! I'm not sure why I never see that Fatshedera lizei in garden centers here but I went ahead and asked Plant Lust to notify me if it becomes available. My Correa are blooming too but I'm not adept at capturing the flowers with my point-and-click camera - is yours as lemony in color as it appears in the photo? I hope your Acacia takes your winter weather in stride and you get some blooms!

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    1. You can mail order the Fatshedera lizei from Cistus! Yes, the Correa flowers are quite lemony and btw a point-and-click camera is all I have too, and those little flowers are hard to get in focus!

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  12. I've been thinking about you and the other Oregon/Washington bloggers during the terrible storms. What a strange weather pattern! I hope you won't have too much damage. All your blooms are stunning, but that peachy Abutilon made my heart jump! Take care, Loree.

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    1. Things turned out to not be quite as dire as predicted, thank goodness! It's a mess out there in the garden but nothing damaged.

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  13. I know every garden with self respect needs a Shefflera, but good grief - where would I put it...? The Correa is super-cute, and its species name makes me giggle. Does it live at the back of the house? I gasp at the size of your Acacia. I planted mine in September 2013 - bought it during that fun nursery romp with Peter. Sad to say, it perished that same winter. Got a new one this year, but I'm going to keep it indoors until spring, since I never got around to planting it. I hope yours survives the winter - it is magnificent!

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    1. Yes indeed, the Correa is at the back of the house! And I too gasp at that Acacia. Mainly thinking what a nightmare it will be to pull it out if it does get hit by cold.

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  14. Piękne rośliny i zdjęcia :-) Część spotykam w Polsce w ogrodach :-)

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  15. The Correa is cute indeed. And I love the Clematis tibetana.

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    1. Thanks Jason, I am thrilled to think it can stay and not take over my garden. We'll see.

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  16. Lovely to see plants that are quite different from what I grow. Thanks for sharing.

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  17. Beautiful. I can see why you cut your Schefflera blooms off. I wouldn't want them weighing the plant sideways either. ... Have you seen Clematis 'My Angel'? It's similar to Clematis tibetana var. vernayi but has yellow and maroon flowers. I'm hoping to get it next spring. I'm glad to hear your C. t. var. v. is better behaved after a haircut.

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