Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Wednesday Vignette, bondage

I noticed this little vignette in the garden of Bob Hyland (full post over there). When I asked about it he explained a desire for the conifer to sort of lay over the rock wall, dramatically. Well it wasn't cooperating so he thought maybe a couple of rocks would assist in the training, and at the very least it would be a conversation starter. Except all open garden long nobody asked about it, until I came along...

Wednesday Vignettes are hosted by Anna at Flutter & Hum. All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

22 comments:

  1. Oh, that is a wonderful blue! What is it, do you know? And, is that Artemisia 'Seafoam' in the background? Very pretty!

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    1. Well the foliage looks like Arizona Ble Ice, a Cypress...but I don't really have any idea. As for the 'Seafoam'...I don't think so...?

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  2. Love this! Though I think they should have made braided ropes of grey twine . . .

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    1. Oh yes, that would have been lovely!

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  3. Funny, I kind of feel like my plants have tied rocks to me this summer! :)

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  4. Oh my! It didn't occur to me that conifers could be trained but I guess that's what happens when they're used in bonsai, isn't it? If anyone asks about my contorted aloe, maybe now I'll say I'm training it.

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    1. Oh yes, I think you should, and then just smile.

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  5. I see this done a lot with fruit trees, where an arching branch habit bares more fruit. It's a common technique with proponents of English double borders, they use this technique on roses for the same purpose, more flowers. Plus, bonsai growers do this, or use wire wrapped around the stems.

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  6. Peter, I'm in stitches here, I do the same thing with my tortured-by-amateur-pruning white pines, old white washlines with rocks dangling to train the branches the way I want them to go. Hey, it works, though. I love the earlier posts, I just can't keep up with everything this year, but rest assured, I'm reading what you write and enjoying every word!

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    1. Hi Karen, there's no Peter here - I'm Loree. Perhaps you were thinking of the Outlaw's blog? Hope your reading his too...it's a good one! http://outlawgarden.blogspot.com/

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  7. Stonework and stone work: works for me!

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  8. Now that's creative and practical at the same time! That's a beautiful conifer. It would be fun to see an update over time. We missed you at the Fling, Loree.

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    1. And I missed being there with you all!

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  9. Clever idea, and trust your sharp eyes to spot it :)

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  10. I've seen it done before but never with such style. Good for you for noticing! Happy birthday, BTW and welcome to the club. (over 30, what'd you think?)

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  11. There's a lot of this behind-the-scenes (mostly) manipulation going on at the Japanese garden. Fun to see to what lengths they will go to encourage a plant to grow "just so".

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    1. Indeed. It's the opposite of my style, with all my naturally contorted oddities.

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