Friday, April 15, 2016

Garden Bloggers Bloomday for April 2016

Spring is in full, glorious bloom in Portland this April...and I've got a lot of flowers to share! First up let's start with the Euphorbias and the bright acid yellow of E. polychroma...

Fabulous!

More bright green flowers, but above purple-tinted foliage (darker in fall and winter) – Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Ruby Glow’...

This one appears to be less attractive to aphids than E. 'Blackbird', although there are still a couple lurking about.

Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae, popping up among the Podophyllum peltatum.

Euphorbia x martinii 'Ascot Rainbow'

It's time to cut back the Euphorbia rigida, before those seeds all pop!

And the last Euphorbia, E. griffithii ‘Fireglow’

Some of you may recall I've gone on record as not liking Epimedium, well except for the spiny E. wushanense. This E. 'Amber Queen' is a bit of a look-alike and a lot cheaper.

Lewisia NOID, with the first of many flowers.

Grevillea juniperina 'Molonglo' and Saxifraga x urbium (tiny white flowers).

Grevillea ‘Poorinda Leane’ – blooming since January!

Grevillea victoriae 'Murray Queen' – blooming since November!!

Grevillea australis

Fothergilla gardenii 'Blue Mist'

Solomon's Seal

Poncirus trifoliata, this was covered in flowers a week ago, most of them have since fallen.

I wonder if there will be fruit?

Magnolia laevifolia

Love love love this one.

Disporum cantonese 'Green Giant'

Since the wind was blowing I thought I'd hold them for a still shot.

Disporum cantonese ‘Night Heron’ – almost there!

Podophyllum pleianthum

Podophyllum pleianthum leaves.

Pulsatilla vulgaris

I would have sworn this one took last year off, but looking back I see it bloomed right on schedule (it's wonderful to have a seven year record of blooms in my garden).

Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum 'Hindwarf' – don't those leaves look horrid? They're supposed to be dark...

Rhododendron stenopetalum 'Linearifolium'

Still haven't planted this one, I need to get on that.

Dianella prunina Rainbow Twist is going to bloom! Yes, that's its blurry bloom spike.

I am thrilled many of my volunteer Cerinthe purpurea survived winter and are blooming.

Lupinus albifrons, which is really purple, really!

Ceanothus 'Dark Star' and Ajuga 'Black Scallop' – not a planned blue-bloom combo, but there it is.

Ceanothus 'Dark Star'

Ajuga 'Black Scallop'

Corokia Cotoneaster

And even though both of these Abutilon are new purchases I'm including them: A. 'Victor Reiter'

And A. Sweet Southern Charm

Finally, with the graceful arches of Stachyurus salicifolius this Bloomday is a wrap!

Thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers Bloomday. All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

36 comments:

  1. What a staggering variety of flowering plants! I enjoyed seeing all of them but especially Pulsatilla vulgaris. I came across some recently and didn't know what they were. Now I do!

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    1. I bought that plant because the one I know, from a garden in Spokane, gets the most amazing seed heads...mine never has. Still, I love it's happy little blooms.

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  2. Glorious. I agree with Gerhard, it is staggering considering I think of you as the foliage queen. Say, if you still want that Epimedium wushanense we have it at Joy Creek.

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    1. Thank you! I actually already have a couple, but of course I'm always on the look out for more...

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  3. Your blooms are spectacular and abundant! Hooray for spring which your garden wears beautifully!

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  4. I guess I'm not the only one noticing that that's a lot of flowers for someone says they really don't like flowers...... :) I do grow some things just for the flowers, but mostly plants need to perform and look good for longer than a short bloom season to merit taking up space in my small yard.
    Everything is stunning. Looks great. I bought Amber Queen this spring. Love that flower color.
    Do the Poncirus flowers have the great citrus scent of the non-hardy citrus?

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    1. I don't think I've ever said that I don't like flowers...just that the flowers aren't why I buy a plant...it's for the form and foliage 98% of the time. I can't help that the eventually bloom too! Sadly I detected no scent to the Poncirus flowers!

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    2. Funny how I can get a totally wrong impression in my head. The fact the flowers are not primary in your plant choices is quite different. I think the gardening community is so lucky these days, as so many plants seem available and bred for fantastic, and even colorful, foliage. But in the end, no matter how you slice it, you have great taste and an amazing garden. Cheers.

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  5. Oh my...each picture/plant is better than the last! (Well, not really -- I like them all! I have that first Euphorbia in my garden, but it doesn't usually bloom until May. You have quite a collection of Grevilleas!

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    1. Thanks PP...it amazes me just how many things I have in bloom.

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  6. Your posts reminds me how much I miss Euphorbia polychroma and that I need to find another. It also reminds me of how many things I won't be able to grow. Happy GBBD to you!

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    1. I picked up a second E. polychroma for $2 the other day. I don't know why exactly - other than it was such a good deal!

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  7. Your garden looks like mid summer to us Mid-westerners! Every time I look at what's blooming in your garden I find something I must have. I guess the good news is they are usually plants for a much warmer climate so my finances don't suffer even if my wishes do.

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    1. I do know that particular kind of suffering. I read a lot of SoCal blogs and I'm always falling for something I can't have.

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  8. You've so many great plants! That Rhododendron is very interesting, not that many of those can be grown in SoCal. I'm wondering why Dianella 'Rainbow Twist' hasn't shown up here (even if I have no idea where I could put yet another variegated plant). The Ceanothus 'Dark Star' I've seen in local garden centers have been pitiful but seeing your specimen makes me think I should pop for one anyway (especially as my Ceanothus hedges seem inclined toward mass suicide). Happy GBBD, Loree!

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    1. I bought that Dianella at our nursery trade show, Farwest, a few years ago (it's not a show where you can buy plants except for at the last minute, when the wholesale vendors would rather not have to back them up and take them home). I've not seen it available retail here, perhaps it just never really took off? Mine (I have two) haven't grown much but at least they're still alive.

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  9. Haha - you weren't kidding... we DO have a bunch of the same plants! The Pulsatilla made me laugh - I have a couple of those too. Except they are done blooming. I love your Grevillea collection - I only have one, which is doing surprisingly well in all my shade. :)

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    1. I'm still smarting over the loss of my Grevillea 'Ned Kelly'- it was such a lovely plant.

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  10. Wonderful flowers in your foliage garden. The Dianella looks so Phormium-like--never seen that one for sale here. The little Pulsatilla is so sweet--how can it be a "vulgaris"? Nothing vulgar there. My fav is the Magnolia--beautiful, beautiful. Is it fragrant? I go stand on my retaining wall at this time of year and sniff the big flowers and heavenly fragrance of my neighbor's M. grandiflora.

    Happy GBBD, you foliage gardener, you!

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    1. That Magnolia is fragrant. It's pretty much the perfect small tree/shrub.

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  11. That Ceanothus is incredible! Wish we could grow it here. Love the Pulsatilla and Lewisia also.

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    1. Thanks Jason, I wish you could grow it too!

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  12. A glorious selection Loree, your garden is much further ahead than mine.

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    1. With our plentiful winter rain, followed by warm temps this month things are very happy!

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  13. Interesting note on Euphorbia amygdaloides ‘Ruby Glow’ as a sub for Blackbird. I dumped my Blackbird two seasons ago due to the aphids. I've used Ascot Rainbow instead and it's been a winner. So much for you only have fab foliage....you're the queen of April Bloom Day :) Cheers, Jenni

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    1. Ascot Rainbow is a great substitute, such a beautiful plant. I do wonder how I ended up with so many flowers!

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  14. I had no idea that corokia bloomed like that! And since you brought it up, I have a confession: I've never been a fan of loropetalum, even when the leaves are dark red. But that little magnolia, I'd love to give it a try in a large pot, probably some afternoon shade I'm guessing. The pasque flowers are exquisite. Surprised to read you don't get seedheads?

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  15. I always look to you to have some spectacular blooms on GBBD and I am never disappointed. Only in so much that I don't have them!

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    1. Thank you for stopping by Jenny!

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  16. Your flowers are like the prizes in Cracker Jack boxes...only a lot more desirable.

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    1. Remind me to tell you about the Cracker Jack prize ring that my grandpa found laying in his parking strip...

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  17. I thought I had commented on this, but I must have been in a floral-induced stupor. So many blooms! I love Epimedium 'Amber Queen'. I added two to my garden this spring. Are you keeping 'Fireglow' in a pot, or is it not supposed to run like other E. griffithii? I confess I love the orange color of that species and wouldn't mind even if it did spread into a large swath. I have the space.

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  18. Gorgeous blooms! Looks like they're getting plenty of rain to keep them fresh. I love the neon green of euphorbias and vibrant blue of ceanothus. Maybe I'm just biased against pastels? The folks next door have an established ceanothus so I get to admire theirs every spring.

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