Sunday, November 15, 2015

November 15th 2015, what's blooming?

Yikers, only one more Bloomday left after this...what a year it's been. Quite a few of my plants decided to try my patience and wait until November to bloom, like this Brugmansia 'Charles Grimaldi' which has finally opened it's first two flowers...

Abutilon megapotamicum 'Red'...

...and Abutilon Nuabyell however have been blooming for months and months!

Correa backhousea, notice tiny little buds to the right of the flower, there will be more from this one.

Eriobotrya japonica flowers keep opening up - much to the delight of the pollinators. No signs of fruit forming yet.

Acanthus sennii is another one of those time-pushers. It's getting closer...

A late Canna flower...

And an early Ceanothus 'Dark Star'.

Clematis tibetana var. vernayi, okay it's no longer a bloom...but it's cool!

I tried to capture the creatures buzzing around the Fatsia japonica blooms, but this is the best I could do. There's a huge incoming on the far left, a small one above him and two others to his right. Then in the upper third of dead center is a fifth, sort of in focus.

Fatsia polycarpa is fixing to bloom, for the first time.

Grevillea 'Peaches and Cream', in the shade pavilion greenhouse.

A Grevillea 'Peaches and Cream' bud...

Grevillea victoriae 'Murray Queen' in it's floral stage.

And bud.

Mahonia x media 'Charity'

This plant is on the north side of our house, next to the neighbors driveway. In other words a very out-of-the-way location. I can only assume there are hummingbirds visiting regularly. Those aren't the typical tubular shaped flowers they adore, but I see them going after the Fatsia japonica blooms so it's possible.

Metapanax delavayi, kind of obvious it's related to the Fatsia isn't it?

Passiflora 'Sunburst' started blooming last month and has had multiple flowers open every day since. This one is only hardy to USDA Zone 10, so I suppose I should start making plans to dig it up, like I did last year.

Passiflora jamesonii 'Coral Seas' wanted to open in time for Bloomday, and it's almost there!

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes', tiny. Impossible to photograph.

Persicaria microcephala 'Red Dragon', a little bit easier.

Rosemary, never a good photo of this one.

Salvia discolor wants to bloom...but this is all I'm getting. What a disappointment this year.

The Tetrapanax papyrifer are also giving it there all, maybe, just maybe (no frost in the forecast, but this time of year there are no guarantees).

And this silly thing! Now that the Stapelia is inside it seems to be on a Bloomday blooming schedule, for two months running at least.

What's blooming in your garden in November? Our hostess Carol at May Dreams Gardens wants you to share images...

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

40 comments:

  1. Kinda interesting. A lot of late blooming exotics shown here. You are doing very well at making them produce any type of flower at all methinks. Love the colors of the passion flowers.

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    1. With any luck next year will be even more colorfully passionate, as I've been collecting a few interesting Passionflowers.

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  2. I can always rely on you to have the most amazing blooms. That Mahonia is beautiful. I have one but maybe ti is in too much shade because it isn't showing any signs of flowering. Happy Bloom day.

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    1. I don't know, mines on the north side of our house so that's some pretty serious shade...

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  3. So glad your Brug opened before frost/freeze killed it. Hope it's giving off a lovely scent. Sometimes it takes a couple of days after they open. Check in the evening.

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    1. Interesting you ask Alison, I've been taking sniff tests everytime I walk Lila and I get nothing!

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  4. Great bloomday post! The Mahonia looks so happy, so healthy--perhaps it pulls you to a less-visited spot, in order to enjoy it? Looks as though you've had wonderful fall weather.

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  5. Adore that Mahonia! I was excited that I actually have a plant blooming in Nov. But you coastal gardeners just blow us out of the water no matter the month.

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    1. We've been very lucky with our weather this year!

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  6. Ooo I've just been playing snap with your post, snapped with brugmansia, abutilons (though not same variety), mahonia media Charity, grevillea victorea. I covert acanthus senni and hace done for ages, someone I know has a wonderful specimen, and have found a supply so plan to get in the spring, I am now converting your Erioboytra, now heard of that and my Rosemary never photographs well either.

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    1. Okay Helen, please explain! "playing snap"?? The most amazing Acanthus senni I've seen was at the Chelsea Physic Garden, have you been?

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  7. Amazing, beautiful blooms. I love the passifloras and the mahonia. Raining here, more on the way, temps tonight in the 30s F -- most tender plants are under cover for now. Will you bring the brugmansia in?

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    1. Last winter the Brugmansia spent time in the shade pavilion greenhouse, on our really cold nights (low 20's) I think I whisked it into the basement. I will probably do the same this year.

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  8. We seem to be doing a role reversal: my Ancanthus senii didn't come close to blooming this year. Many drool-worthy blooms in this post. Is it really November?

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    1. Interesting, I wonder why? November...I know, crazy right?

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  9. You've got more going up there than I have down this way, Loree! I love the Fatsia flower photo. I can never get a good photo of my rosemary either (mine ended up in the trash can this month) and my photo-shy Grevillea 'Peaches & Cream' is once again refusing to flaunt its stuff on Bloom Day.

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    1. Oh I don't know about that Kris, you shared quite a few flowers in your bloomday post!

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  10. You've got lots in bloom still. I wonder what things will be like a month from now? This winter could surprise us all, in a good way.

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    1. Fingers crossed you're right Gerhard. Of course what I'm most worried about in that scenario is some freaky drop to the mid to low 20's that only lasts one or two nights but does a lot of damage. That kind of thing has me hoping for a slow, gradual, dip into the high 20's so things have a chance to go dormant. Then again if we just stayed in the 30's all winter I would be a very happy camper!

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  11. Love that passiflora 'Sunburst' as it's got such a great color. The way your camellia foliage echoes the color of the Albizia julibrissin 'summer Chocolate' is striking. It would be so cool if this were the year that our tetrapanax beat the frost! Great picture of the bees attacking the fatsia blooms!

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    1. Camellia? I ain't got no stinking Camellia! (Canna?) Sorry...I couldn't help myself.

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    2. Yup, Canna. Don't know what I was thinking.

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  12. Do you keep your metapanax outside all winter?

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  13. I never tire of seeing your Mahonia x media 'Charity'. Such a cool plant.

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  14. Great blooms! I hope your Acanthus sennii blooms. Did it die to the ground last winter? Just curious because I read somewhere that they only bloom on older stems.

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    1. This one that is blooming was a new purchase in the spring, which might prove your theory since I have no idea what it did last winter. My other plant, which did die down to the ground, started to annoy me (I know) so I cut it to use in a vase. Which is when I learned that they do not like being cut, everything wilted.

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  15. Nice! My favorites: the Ceanothus, the Fatsia, and the Mahonia.

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    1. I need to do a survey and see if that Ceanothus is blooming elsewhere around town.

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  16. My brug has lost all its leaves. Time to move him to the garage!

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    1. Seriously? How cold have you gotten?

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  17. Oh my goodness, that Passionflower is dreamy! I'm planning to plant Maypops next spring--the only Passionflower that's hardy here. They're so lovely! Love the Abutilons and the Acanthuses and the Clematises and the Mahonias ... oh my! Happy GBBD!

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  18. It is incredible that you can have brugmansia flowers outside in mid november!!! and many other of the blooms. So many interesting blooms, as always.

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  19. So lovely to see all your blooms, Loree, especially on this gloomy and rainy cold day here in Illinois. The mahonia is beautiful! Every time I've seen this plant, I have wished they would survive in my garden, but I guess I will have to settle for admiring them from afar. Happy Bloom Day!

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  20. And when your Metapanax sets seeds do not forget about your European fellow gardeners who crave for the plant but cannot get it here...

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    1. Remind me and I would be happy to share!

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  21. How very kind!!! So I suppose next year in Spring.

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