Tuesday, September 25, 2018

I've been gnomed....

We've got a pretty tight group of Garden Bloggers here in the Portland area, we get together to socialize throughout the year, hit nurseries, visit each other's gardens, etc. Last Saturday I hosted a gathering here, in my garden, and — well after everyone left I noticed a disturbing infestation...of garden gnomes...

I think this one, below, is the head of the gang. The one above was on "look out" in the front garden. Probably signaling to lost gnomes headed down the street

This guy has definitely seen some hard-core gnome antics.

These two diminutive gnomes were up to no good in the shady corner.

Notice the shovel, I'm sure he was intent on stealing my Coniogramme emeiensis 'Golden Zebra'.

This guy passed out shortly after the party started.

A day drinker if ever I saw one.

This fellow is hiding something, I'm sure of it.

This fellow, and his delivery of sunflowers (I wonder if they're "sleepy sunflowers"? Like the poppies in the Wizard of Oz?), got lost and ended up among the carnivorous plants. Run little gnomey run!

AH! A gnome pretending to be a chocolate Easter bunny!

Actually this one was a custom creation, he's holding an Agave!

That's a total of eight gnomes I've found. I get the feeling there may still be a couple more hiding in the shadows, we shall see. And where will they show up next? The first (much smaller) infestation broke out last spring in Patricia's garden. Later there were signs of it spreading to Alan's in SW Portland, then Laura's up in Vancouver, WA — now mine, and their numbers are growing — clearly no garden is safe!

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The occasion of last Saturday's gathering was our fall plant swap, I tried to be a very good girl and not grab too many plants. I do not need more plants. This Trevesia palmata (Snowflake Aralia) however came with my name on it, a gift from Peter, he has a smaller one he kept.

Those leaves!

Those spikes! However it's not hardy here in Zone 8, so I am gonna have to treat it like a houseplant for the next 6 or so months...

Peter also brought me a pup from his Agave americana 'Mediopicta Aurea'...
And an Aloe aristata. I have a few of these in the ground, and they've done just fine. I think I'll wait and plant this one out in the spring however.
From Lance I grabbed a gorgeous Aeonium, he's got a way with these things. I just hope I can keep it happy over winter. He also brought a small pile of divided bare root Hesperaloe, I scored one and need to remember to get it into the ground soon.
Patricia practically forced me to take this Kalanchoe orgyalis (Copper Spoons). What could I do but say yes?

Paul (co-owner of Xera Plants) brought plants from the nursery! I scored a Seseli gummiferum (moon carrot)...

And this adorable little Trachelospermum, T. asiaticum 'Shirofu Chirimen', those leaves really are that small. It's hardy to zone 7b, evergreen, and wil reach 3ft tall in 5 years.

Finally my last plant came from Joy Creek, a special delivery from Tamara (who couldn't make it to the swap) to Anna to me. I forgot to take a photo of it here, at my house, so I'm using the one Tamara sent me. Isn't it cute? Most importantly I wonder if it's gnome resistant?

Weather Diary, Sept 24: Hi tbd, Low tbd/ Precip tbd

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

23 comments:

  1. Saxifraga hypnoidea. Maybe it works as a gnome trap, hypnotizing them so you can capture them more easily? I missed my chance to buy this really cool zombie gnome. You're welcome. I have to admit I'm a little envious of that Trevesia, even though I have too many houseplants already and wouldn't know where to put one that big anyway. I love our blogger group gatherings. Such wonderful people!

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    1. Well if the time comes for me to pass on the Trevesia I know who to target! (thanks for one less gnome)

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  2. The gnomes are great, everybody that brought them picked out great ones. I didn't know they had done this before to others. I was going to make Nigel wear his gnome hat to the gathering, but then of course I wasn't feeling well and didn't come. That might have given things away, but he would have been removeable at the end of the day. You scored some great plants!

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    1. I would have made Nigel pose for a photo! Although I imagine he'd have been willing. I'm sorry you didn't make it.

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  3. Have you thought about using the Copper Spoon to eat the Moon Carrot? Maybe you could feed it to the Gnomes and they would move on to another garden. Love that Saxifraga; what great texture.

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  4. As pranks go, the gnomes were a good one. What are you going to do with them? Your plant haul was very restrained I think. I love the Trachelospermum.

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    1. I've gathered up the gnomes and they're ready to move on to another (yet to be determined) garden, soon.

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  5. I like to use organic products to rid my garden of pesky gnomes. This Amazon product is a lot like lady bugs and lace wings and once you buy it, your gnome problem will disappear permanently:

    https://www.amazon.com/Gnome-be-Gone-Mini-Gnome-Bearers-Sugarpost/dp/B002K6BSJE

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    1. Ha! I've seen those "gnome be gone" guys in a friend's garden. Pretty clever.

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  6. Thanks again for hosting this fun event! I think we all left happy with our new plants. It's okay if you secretly adore gnomes Loree, we'll still love and respect you. No need to make up some story about other people bringing them in. After all, what you do in the privacy of your own gnome is no one else's business.

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    1. You should have heard Andrew when he walked into the back garden the next day. As far as he was concerned I couldn't get rid of them fast enough.

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  7. Great post! I reminds me of when we would "ring and run" in graduate school.
    We passed around a stool and and 14 inch plastic egg. Love all your new plants. We don't have good luck with Aeonium, but I love them. Glad you have a beautiful new one to enjoy.

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  8. Beautiful! I love garden gnomes, I have 2 and hope to add more to my garden.

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    1. Too bad you're not closer. I've got a few looking for a home!

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  9. A lot of fun. A few years back a group of folks in town would scatter a group of plastic pink flamingoes across a 'victim's lawn in the night. The recipient then had to stealthily do the same to another. It got pretty crazy!

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    1. That sounds like a crack up! :D
      Loved how you got gnomed, Loree. Funny stuff

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    2. There was a company doing the pink flamingo thing here for awhile. They'd show up in someone's front yard along with a sign "you've been flocked"...I do love me some pink flamingos!

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  10. What a fun idea for the host's garden to be gnomed. And you have some seriously interesting plants at your plant swaps. I saw moon carrot for the first time this summer at the Denver BG. I was over the moon in love with it.

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    1. Oh ya, our group brings the best plants to our swaps! I wonder how moon carrot would do in Texas?

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