Friday, December 11, 2015

Huntington Fridays from 2014; the Australian Garden

First of all I lied. The Australian Garden at the Huntington will not be the subject of this and next week's post. Last December when I dumped the photos into folders I neglected to separate out the Subtropical Garden images. So this week Australia, next week Subtropical...all beautiful.

The Australian Garden at the Huntington is very open, so much so that it takes a bit of getting used to after being in the densely planted Desert and Jungle Gardens (there is a map of the gardens here, if you're curious).

Things are fairly well labeled though, which is nice, Callistemon pinifolius...

Grevillea thelemanniana 'Gilt Dragon', this plant almost appeared to glow.

And the flowers were quite lovely.

Eremophila maculata, aka spotted emu bush

No idea on the ID of this gorgeous tree.

That striking bark should make it an easy one for someone in the know...

Eucalyptus 'Torwood'

Another Callistemon (that I could not find a label for).

Pandorea doratoxylon, commonly known as western wonga vine.

Eucalyptus caesia

Callistemon montana, foliage and buds...

Callistemon montana, flower...

Adenanthos cunninghamii

I could have taken photos of this for hours. The subtle color difference at the tips, and the way it shimmered in the light...stunning.

Oh, not to mention the tiny flowers.

Acmena ingens

Close up...

Doryanthes excelsa

I couldn't decide which image I liked better, so included them both. There's a great image of the unusual flower here.

Xanthorrhoea resinosa, I wish these were hardy in Portland, Oregon.

Unknown Grevillea flower.

And another with foliage, maybe Grevillea 'Moonlight'?

Macrozamia communis, the pair of Cycads on the right.

Pretty fabulous eh?

Grevillea 'Long John'

Eucalyptus macrocarpa, another one that I couldn't stop photographing.

Every thing about this is gorgeous!

Right?

And finally I'll end with another Cycad, Macrozamia macdonnellii. Hopefully someday I'll visit the real Australia, wouldn't that be wonderful! Next week, the Subtropical Garden...

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

32 comments:

  1. You've treated the Australian garden very well. It's always been a bit of disappointment to me, something to get through one the way to the roses or the Japanese garden from the desert section.

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    1. That's been my reaction in the past, a disappointment. I think because I now know what to expect I'm able to appreciate it for what it is.

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  2. Oh, thanks so much for sharing your photos from your 2014 visit. I wanted so much to go to the Huntington last May, but that damn three-day migraine prevented it. Your pictures are the next best thing. I didn't realize Eucalyptus flowers were so fab. Now I'm dying to see what the flowers on mine look like.

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    1. You'll get there someday Alison!

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  3. Oh, this post just kept getting better and better. Australia is definitely on my list, such fabulous plants.

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    1. Indeed, someday I WILL visit Australia!

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  4. Yay for Australia!! Thank you Loree, it takes me away....far far away....

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    1. You lucky girl - to have been there!

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  5. Eucalyptus with red blooms are so cool as are all of those grevillea. So many amazing plants from Australia! Why don't we live in California yet?

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  6. Yes that's 'Moonlight' I think the sign on the smooth Euc was E. grandis? I remember gawking at the bark...it flakes from the bottom upwards, instead of all over.

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    1. I wanted that to be a Eucalyptus, but looking at the photo the leaves just didn't seem right.

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  7. Reminds me of home, oh it is home, still great to see the beautiful photos you've taken.

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  8. Looks like the Australian garden has come a long way since I visited too long ago. On the other hand, it may just be that I lack your eye.

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    1. I doubt that, my eye ain't got nothing on your eye. It is growing in...although I think about 1,000 more plants are needed.

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  9. Feels like another planet, these are all so totally unfamiliar to this Midwesterner. I'd like to grow that grassy plant as well. Striking.

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    1. Another planet...not too far off actually!

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  10. It took me a little while to appreciate the varied foliage and quirky flowers of native plants in Australia - the bush landscape can feel a bit blah on first impression. I have an Adenanthos sericeus (Woolly Bush) at home and I keep stroking its silky-soft foliage. Love all the eucalyptus colours too!

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    1. We tend to overlook the beauty of what's available locally in favor of those things elsewhere, I know I'm guilty!

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  11. The smooth, colorful trunked tree looks like a Painted Gum, Eucalyptus deglupla. It isn't hardy in the PNW, but a gardening friend of mine in Olympia has been growing one for over two years with protection. He realizes that at some point it will die, but is having fun with it now.
    John (Aberdeen)

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    1. Good for him! It is a beauty. How big is it?

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  12. Thank you for transporting me to Australia on this dark, soggy day. I'd love to go to Australia someday. Group trip? Haha. Forget California. We should move to Brookings, Oregon, pool our resources, and start a botanic garden there. The climate there supports about the widest plant variety on the West Coast.

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    1. Yes! We rent a small plane and fill it with plant people, wouldn't that be the best? Re: Brookings, Oregon...why do spots like that, with great weather, have to be so darn far away from civilization?

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  13. Your photos of the Eucalyptus made me miss them in my garden. It's too bad their height sends my neighbor into an apoplectic fit.

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    1. That neighbor needs to move into some sort of high-rise apartment building.

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  14. so pleased you like these plants. I think Australian plants often not as dramatic as US or European ones. Hope you guys come to Australia some time, it would be amazing to meet some cyberfriends face to face! I tried to grow that Moonlight Grevillea but it was too fussy and didn't make it.

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    1. I adore Australian plants and thing they're some of the best there are!

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  15. I need to review this post before my next trip to the Huntington.

    The photo of Grevillea 'Long John' made me want to cry -- my poor potted one looks so unhappy. More sun, maybe...

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    1. Sun? I've forgotten what that is...

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  16. Oh, so cool! We never got to the Australian Garden. We are going back to LA this Christmas. If I only get one day for garden visiting, should we go back to the Huntington or try the Descanso or the South Coast Botanical Garden? Also, my son wants to go to LACMA - maybe they have a garden worth visiting, so that it would be a twofer.

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    1. Hmmm, maybe the LA County Arboretum?
      http://www.thedangergarden.com/2015/05/a-visit-to-los-angeles-county-arboretum.html
      http://www.thedangergarden.com/2015/05/my-visit-to-los-angeles-county.html

      I haven't been to Descanso, I've heard mixed reviews. The Huntington is always a winner!

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