Tuesday, November 25, 2014

A stroll around the Kennedy School gardens...



The name is no doubt familiar to those of you who attended the Portland Garden Blogger's Fling, or even to those of you who followed along at home, reading posts about the event. I'm sort of embarrassed to admit it's been awhile (maybe even since last July) that I took a nice long walk around the gardens. This was our ultimate destination the day Lila went on the walk I mentioned here...

A shot for all of you who like the 'Spider's Web' Fatsia, personally I still don't understand the attraction.

This trellis though, I love it.

And I still miss my dearly departed Brachyglottis greyi.

Looks more like spring than mid-November, post storm.

That's more like it!

This looks positively winter-ish to me, sort of cold and bare.

I thought perhaps their tetrapanx would benefit from a micro-climate with the building some what wrapping around it. No such luck.

Another year with unsuccessful blooms.

I'm still considering adding a Rhododendron stenopetalum 'Linearifolium' to my garden.

And this beauty has got me reconsidering Euphorbia 'Tasmanian Tiger.' 

Love those hips!

And how I would love a smaller version of this to act as my Christmas tree.

Eriobotrya japonica

Something is missing! Uhmm. Maybe a huge mahonia? What was there...

A new crop of catkins are forming on the Garrya elliptica.

And there's one last bloom trying to open on the callistemon (C. sieberi, I believe).

So much color!

Can anyone tell me the name of this fern?

Mahonia gracilipes

Such a cool plant.

As is Mahonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress.'

The spikes!

I hadn't noticed Agave 'Mateo' here before.

And there were several echium seedlings that shrugged of the recent cold.

Another empty hole! If I'm not mistaken there was a lovely Agave parryi here, in fact I spot a tiny pup. I wonder what happened to it?

At least the nolinas and A. ovatifolia are still there.

But wait just a moment! Look what Lila has spotted...

Check out this beauty!

A variegated Agave parryi, when did this happen!

And there are so many pups...

Achingly beautiful.

One last glance back at the spikes...

They put in a kitchen garden, nice!

I need to get back in the habit of walking this garden every couple of weeks. There is so much to see!

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

27 comments:

  1. I forget how beautiful this garden is, particularly during Autumn! Love all of the different foliage types. Odd to see the holes in the garden, isn't it? Wonder if something happened to the mama Agave. Maybe ice, too much water? Gorgeous varigated A. parryi. Were you just a wee bit tempted to ask them for the smallest pup???

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    1. My visit was too close to when the freezing rain fell (just a couple of days later) so I don't think ice was the culprit, it's a mystery! And yes, very tempted...

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  2. That variegated A. parryii has me salivating. And I adore their monkey puzzle tree.

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    1. There used to be a pair of MP tree's, then one day, seemingly overnight, one turned brown.

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  3. So much to see indeed, and that variegated agave parryi, wow! Your photos brings back memories, including having ice cold beer with Gerhard and Sean at the basement.

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    1. I wish I would have stayed and hung out with you guys! One of my (few) regrets of that time. I was just so so so exhausted, and then there was the whole dead car in the street thing that I had to deal with.

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  4. Yes, I hope you tour here often! I've added a lot of euphorbs this fall,including the Tasmanian. I hope mine do this well -- they've been wimpy growers in the past. That variegated parryi is fantastic. I remember the spike garden very well. Lila still has some long walks in her!

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    1. She does, just a few. This is a good one for her because I am so slow working my way through the garden that she has plenty of down time.

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  5. the variegated parryi has the reverse pattern of ssp. huachucensis cv 'excelsior' and could be something like this:

    http://www.plantdelights.com/Agave-parryi-Excelsior-sport-PDN03/

    -- you should definitely arrange to get a pup, that is a great variant!

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    1. Oh yes! That definitely looks like it, thanks for the link. And I will certainly try to secure my own...

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  6. The Kennedy School Garden looks great in the fall too! Thanks for the great tour. I saw a variegated A. parryi pup for sale on Ebay and they said that the vairety, Lime Stripe, has just been propagated through tissue culture. I'd imagine that we'll be seeing more and more of them on the market in the future. You really do need a pup from this plant though!

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    1. I really do. Erich? Pretty please...

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  7. Oops, that was 'Lime Streak'

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  8. I agree with your observation of 'Spider's Web' Fatsia. What is the plant in front of the Fatsia and to the left?

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    1. I believe it's Carex 'sparkler'
      http://plantlust.com/plants/carex-phyllocephala-sparkler/

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  9. Great to see it again; now having been there (when it was like 200 degrees) I can visualize and see changes--love watching things grow. That's the difference between plants and furniture.

    'Spiders Web' so far is a profound disappointment, because it doesn't seem to get cold enough here to make the webs appear. Oh well...

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    1. And it's so nice to hear one of you Californians refer to our heat in an exaggerated way! So often it's more of a mocking tone.

      I am sorry your 'Spiders Web' isn't living up to it's name.

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  10. Is that possible "Sensitive Fern", Onoclea sensibilis? Maybe not...

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    1. The correct answer appears to be Dryopteris seiboldii, although I needed reminding to look for an Onoclea sensibilis too, so thank you!

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  11. Your mystery fern is Dryopteris sieboldii! One of my favorites from my time in North Carolina. Glad to see it likes the PNW, too!

    So many great plants here, it's hard to decide what to comment on. If only for its mystery, I want to know who the cold beauty between the photos of Acer griseum and Tetrapanax is.

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    1. I believe it's a Lagerstroemia but I have no idea which one!

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  12. It's great to have a place like that within walking distance. And it's good you have Lila along "on the ground floor" to catch things you might miss (like an agave - ha!). Your unidentified fern reminds me of the brake ferns, possibly Pteris multifida.

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    1. Oh I like that Pteris multifida too! (but this one is a Dryopteris seiboldii).

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  13. The fern is Dryopteris seiboldii, a wonderful fern, I love it too and want a few more :) . http://plantlust.com/plants/dryopteris-sieboldii/

    I love my Fatsia Spiders Web but mine is in deep shade and really helps to lighten things up

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    1. Thanks for the name and link (to plant lust no less!). I am now officially on the hunt for that fern.

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  14. Ohh!! it´s so beautiful in autumn too! nice to see it now that I know the place. And that variegated Agave parryi!!!! I love it.

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