Thursday, November 6, 2014

New Case Study Bowls from Modernica and a giveaway…


Last January I wrote about receiving and planting up a black Case Study Table Top Cylinder from Modernica (above, with the yellow cactus). I love that planter as much, if not more, than the day it arrived - so imagine my excitement when I got an email from the generous folks at Modernica offering to send me one of their Case Study Table Top Bowls. Yes it was a happy day when I came home from a dog-walk to see this...

I wasted no time in tearing into the box and was thrilled to discover they sent me both the orange and charcoal bowls (Lila doesn’t quite understand what the excitement was all about).

Last time I treated the new planter as an excuse to go plant shopping. This time, with autumn upon us and so many tender plants needing to be brought inside, well, that just seemed like the wrong approach. So instead I went out to the garden and lifted the succulents (sometimes just cutting them out of the soil, because it’s easier that way and they'll regrow roots in no time). Here’s the bounty I came up with…

I think I was heavily influenced by the season because for the orange bowl I selected the dark Echeveria 'Black Prince'. When I cut these I managed to get a bit of stem and roots, so planting them was just a matter of mounding up the soil and sort of working the plant down into it.

I should also mention I drilled a hole in the bottom of each bowl before planting, knowing they’ll end up outside next summer I want them to drain.

Once planted the echeveria take up most of the container, with just a tiny bit of soil exposed.

You know I can’t stand the sight of bare soil in a container so I used a bit of moss (recently purchased at the craft store and I'm obsessed with it...that bright green color!) to cover it up. Normally moss and succulents would not be a great idea together but since they’ll be indoors I can control the moisture level.

For the charcoal bowl I decided to go with a blue/green scheme and chose the Echeveria elegans and Aloe saponaria. Some of the echeveria stems were cut (with no roots) so I was sure to let them callus over before planting, I don't want to invite disease or rot.

The aloes had easily popped right out of the garden soil roots and all, and the leaves are plenty plump due to all the rain we've been getting.

The finished bowls!

I couldn't get decent photos inside (low light) so decided to take them out to the patio for their photo shoot, please ignore the fir tree litter, it's been windy...

I love the bright orange combined with the dark succulent leaves, and the green moss makes the center of the plants pop.

And I somehow managed to fit three plants in there!

The charcoal bowl is equally stuffed.

Up in the title of this post I mentioned a giveway: indeed, you've got a chance to win your own table top bowl from Modernica! Just indicate in the comments below what color you'd like to have them send you; orange, charcoal, or white (you can see them here, and take a look at the rest of the Case Study collection here). You must live within the contiguous U.S. to enter and provide a way for us to get ahold of you (if you aren't commenting with a link to a blog then be sure to share an email address). A random winner will be chosen from all comments received up until 6pm PST this Sunday, November 9th, and announced on Monday's blog post. ***NOTE - the contest is over and the winner was announced here***

One more thing...if you are a fan of mid-century design, you really should follow the Modernica blog. I've been doing so since receiving the first planter and enjoy their frequent posts, especially the "inspire me Monday" series with entries like this. Good luck with the contest!

The fine print - Modernica sent me the bowls (free of charge) with the expectation I would post about them and give one away. Which of course I was happy to do, why wouldn't I? All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

44 comments:

  1. The bowls are cool by themselves, but I love what you did with them, especially the charcoal one--that color combination is killer. So, yes, I'd love to have my own in charcoal.

    Keeping my fingers crossed...

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  2. Oh lordy, I'd love one of those bowls -- in orange please! I love the dark Echevaria in yours. Thanks for the tip about their blog, I'm going to check it out.

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  3. I have planter envy, in charcoal please...

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  4. Nice, Nice, NICE! You do have a way with a planter. I'd love to win one of these: Orange is my color, but I do love white, too...decisions, decisions...okay, orange please!

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  5. Gimme a charcoal one! ME ME ME ME ME!!!!! ;-)

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  6. The new succulent bowls look great, Loree. They'd look great at my mid-century house too so I'll throw my hat in. Should I win, I'd prefer the charcoal version.

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  7. Orange!! I love this tutorial. I've been meaning to create my own version. Pick me! (kingshockeyfan310@gmail.com)

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  8. Love the charcoal! Oh, pretty please pick me!!!

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  9. I'd love to try a charcoal one as well. Nice pots!

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  10. Your bowls look great stuffed to the brim, and they have just enough height to see a pop of their color. Were I to win, I'd select orange, I even had my patio furniture powdercoated orange.

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  11. How do you make your planters look so good immediately? Mine always take a while to settle in before they look like that.

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    1. Over-planting, that's my "secret"...

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  12. Oh, they both look so good! I would take an orange one but we know Lisa is just going to swoop in and win this one. ;)

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    1. Lisa, that one everything at the GB Fling? She can't win, she's not in the contiguous U.S., sadly for her...lucky for you.

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  13. so many plants asking to come in for the winter. white.

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  14. The bowls look awesome stuffed with succulents! I love the orange with the bright green moss, perfect to brighten up this cloudy gray northwest day.

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  15. Jealous! How nice to be surprised with a Case Study bowl. Something that has been on my wish list for quite some time! I'm coveting that orange one - perfect shade of orange.

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  16. We're not in the running of course but still we just have to comment how fabulous those two planters are especially after you've cast your magic on them! Very stylish as always!

    Oh, and we wish we can get hold of that type of moss here, so vivid green!

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    Replies
    1. You guys are sweet, as always. Has the U.S. company Michaels (www.michaels.com) invaded your shores? that's where the moss came from.

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  17. oh my gosh! Those are beautiful, I would love to win one! In white!

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  18. what fun! charcoal please - hope it is my lucky day to be picked!
    miamillion@comcast.net

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  19. Remember when most flower pots were deep, really deep and most plants never sent roots down there? This is definitely an improvement. Orange looks good.

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    1. I'm picturing those really deep terracotta pots...

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  20. As Mark and Gaz say, I wish I could get that moss...I like it too much. The planters are very stilish, beautiful, and they look perfect with the plants you chose. Do you know if that moss is the moss that grows in tree trunks in the PNW? it looks like the moss I saw in Yosemite covering secuoya truncs, or in the forests in Oregon.

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    1. The moss is the kind you buy at the craft store (www.michaels.com) in a bag. I'm sure it's been dyed and treated with many horrible chemicals.

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    2. Ohh, hahaha, ok, it doesn't have that color without that treatment...

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  21. clean simplicity- I'm in!
    color me black, please
    johnnybc@cox.net

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  22. Orange you glad they sent orange?

    Quit bragging about rain, 'k? You're killing me.

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  23. Gorgeous! White is my choice. I have a bunch of succulents in plastic pots, waiting for a home together in an arrangement. Thanks for sharing your inspiration -- what did you do with your other Echeveria?

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    1. The other dark ones went in creamy colored containers I bought at Goodwill when I was in Seattle (they look vintage but they had that foil Made in China sticker) and the purple ones went in an old IKEA container which is ugly but stays downstairs under lights for the winter. That color (the pink/purple) just doesn't work anywhere in the house on display.

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  24. They both look great! If I'm lucky, I'd like charcoal. Thanks for doing this!

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  25. ohhh I love the charcoal!

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  26. White for me.
    I enjoy reading all about your sharp plants and have now included 2 agaves in my life because of your blog.
    karlynski@yahoo.com

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    1. You have no idea how much I love reading things like that (the agaves) thank you!

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  27. How fortunate that you have such a bounty of succulents to pot up in your new planters. And what a wonderful job you did. I am always amazed when I see blogs of gardeners potting up succulents. How much does it cost them is my frequent question. You clearly treat your plants better than I do because they are always slow to make more. So, I would love to win the charcoal pot.

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    1. I don't understand Jenny, "How much does it cost them"?? You mean the containers?

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  28. Pick me! I had to move to South Dakota, so I miss growing agaves and succulents outdoors. Hopefully I can bring some interest to the garden world out here!

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    1. Your move was intense, so fast and so far. I hope you can spark a new way of gardening out there. I have great sympathy for your lack of being able to grow the plants you love in the ground.

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    2. Thanks Loree. Actually it's not so bad. It's a fun challenge to explore what might do great out here and what might be pushed some. I use Denver Botanic Garden as inspiration. I've already found that pollinators need lots of help out here among the leagues of corn and soybeans.

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  29. I'm entering strictly to see that orange doesn't get an inferiority complex.

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    1. I'm afraid that's a label white is going to be wearing.

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  30. Blank canvas white for me, please! I just returned from an afternoon trip to Garden Fever, and came here for some planting inspirado for my recently acquired fuzzy and pokey succulents. What luck!

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