Thursday, August 21, 2014

Garden Tour, 2014

There are times I am certain this blog is more for me than it is for my readers. Being able to look back at a visual record of my garden over the last 5 and a half years is priceless. Last year I did a comprehensive garden tour and I've referred back to those photos many times, so with that in mind I was determined to do a "tour 2014." However every time I went to take photos the light was horrible, I'd snap a few photos and then give up. So you'll notice this post is a collection of photos taken over a week's time. You'll see blue skies, and cloudy skies, but hopefully end up with a snapshot of my garden as it is Summer 2014. Yes this is going to be a lengthy, photo-heavy, post...

Editing these photos also drove home just what a discontented year this has been for me. The front garden is not looking as put together this year, due to the "glue" plants (Grevillea juniperina 'Molonglo') dying last winter. Replacements (Juniperus conferta 'Blue Pacific') have been planted but are not yet of size. They'll eventually knit everything together, at least that's the plan.

Here is the north side of the house (on the right side of the opening image, photo taken while standing in the neighbors driveway). Things over here have grown in nicely.

Imperata cylindrica 'Rubra'

Mystery sedum on the chimney (this one's for you Alan). I have no idea how it got there and I never, ever, water it.

Mahonia fortunei 'Curlyque'

The clematis growing in our back garden (behind that bamboo, on the other side of the neighbors garage) was reaching around, toward the light. I started trimming it back but then learned they were actually excited to train it up over the top of the door. It didn't take long to fill in.

Back at the northeast corner of our house now, looking south across the top of the garden. You can see just a slice of the sidewalk to the front door.

And the front of the house, it was just last year that all of these plants went in...when the giant rhododendron came out and before that the Pieris japonica. They've all grown a lot!

A garden can never have enough sempervivum.

Soft and delicate meets sharp and sturdy.

I love the view out my front door. Usually there's a creature, or five, buzzing and flying around out there.

Cotinus ‘Royal Purple'

Now standing in our driveway looking back towards the house...

Yucca rostrata, Eryngium agavifolium and Agave americana planted at the corner of the drive and the public sidewalk.

Eryngium maritimum

Looking back toward the street as I walk around to the south side of the house...

Where the veggie garden is. I've already blogged about removing the cucumber, but the basil and tomatoes are still going strong.

Have you grown Sungold? If not you really should. They are the tastiest...

This is another view that makes me want to hide my eyes, the entrance into our back garden. Yes I'm still happy that we removed the privet but I really REALLY don't like the openness of this view (even with the offending garage color blocking cropped out).

And this angle suffers from the loss of the loquat I moved to the lower garden (and then gave to the neighbor). Those big leaves really broke up all that fine foliage.

The former hydrangea area, being overtaken by a happy clematis.

The growing Nothopanax delavayi makes me very happy (those 3 tall shoots slightly right of center).

It's new foliage is wonderful.

Towards the shade pavilion...

And turning back around to look northeast. That lighter brown structure is the neighbors garage.

I still love my hibiscus (H. syriacus 'Red Heart') as much as the day I bought it. I just wish the Begonia luxurians I planted at it's base (a gift from the Outlaw) were hardy, the combination is a good one.

The palm is growing...

And the Melianthus major 'Antonow's Blue' has certainly recovered from freezing to the ground.

I've got big plans for this loquat (Eriobotrya japonica), it's gonna help hide the new view.

The Senecio mandraliscae have enjoyed their summer vacation outside in the ground.

Okay now were down on the patio (I neglected to take the important "approaching the patio" shot). Southwest corner...

Southeast corner...

Under the shade pavilion...

And now I'm under the shade pavilion and looking north.

I've intended to feature this aloe, A. marlothii, as a weekly favorite. Poor guy keeps getting passed over.

Banksia blechnifolia got the "fav" treatment last May.

Looking back towards our garage and my circle pot.

And a new view! Standing in the graveled, planted, area north of the patio where the privet (and ivy and vinca) used to be, looking south.

And in the very northwestest corner of our lot looking out...

A wider view.

I'm still thrilled I managed to track down this variegated daphniphyllum.

Persicaria 'Brushstrokes'...light on the brushstrokes.

The stock tank pond.

Which has been blessed with water lilly blooms practically nonstop.

Top to bottom: Clifford (our Magnolia macrophylla), Papyrus, Sammy (Yucca rostrata) and Acacia baileyana 'Purpurea'.

My most successful castor bean...

And finally I'll end this tour with my favorite early morning, coffee on the patio, shot. For a look back at previous years: Garden Tour 2013, A Comparison between 2005 and 2012, and for a different 2012 tour a post on Apartment Therapy, and then what I think may have been my first summer tour post in 2010.

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

50 comments:

  1. Great tour, Thank you! It looks fabulous. I can totally understand the discontentedness with the openness of the former privet-lands. My front garden is very open now too. Actually it always was open, because it was just grass to the street, but I really want it to be more enclosed. Hurry up and grow big! I really should do a similar tour on my blog.

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    1. Everyone should do a full garden tour!

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  2. Replies
    1. And yet there are still more I want.

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  3. Thoroughly enjoyed the tour Loree, thank you. It's impossible to pick out individual plants for a mention, you have so many spectacular ones. Love the way it all fits together, seating areas in sun and shade and the brilliantly coloured pots!

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  4. I like photo heavy posts!! I still can't believe I was standing there, right in your beautiful garden, admiring all the plants! I really enjoyed it. This is a very nice tour!

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    1. I kind of can't believe it either Lisa, it's like it was all a dream. The only bad thing about having so many people here all at once is that I didn't get to spend much one on one time with any of you. Just hanging out and chatting on the patio would have been wonderful.

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    2. That is true, but it is much much much better than nothing! And you were the best host ever! :)

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  5. Loree, your garden looks fantastic. The open spaces that bother you aren't an issue for the viewer (at least not this one). Your garden is a testament to the value of basing a garden on foliage rather than flowers (not that the Hibiscus isn't absolutely fabulous).

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    1. Thanks Kris, I am a fan of the over planted so open space just makes me nervous. It's weird. It still kind of amazes me that hibiscus is hardy here, flowers like that just look so exotic!

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  6. Amazing! Thanks for this great tour! I too am impatiently waiting for additional privacy in our back garden, and looking back over older photos help me see how quickly things have come along, even if it doesn't feel like it in the day-to-day.

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    1. Indeed, I was shocked at a couple of things that I would have said haven't grown at all.

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  7. You've just transported us back as to how it felt seeing your garden for the first time during the fling (how time flies!). Your garden is wonderful and we absolutely love it and is a source of inspiration. And we feel privileged we have seen it and said our praises in the flesh too beforehand :)

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    1. Ah shucks! I am so glad you guys came to Portland...and that I've been able to see your garden too.

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  8. So many great spots! Thanks for the tour - what a delicious place you've created.

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    1. Thank you Susan, oh my...I still need to take you up on that garden visit you offered!

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  9. Your garden is looking lovely Loree.

    The recent(ish) big changes that you made and the replacement planting now make a lot of sense when I see your garden in its entirety.

    I like your nortwestest shot and the following wider view shot.

    It is good to have these shots as a reference and to look back at in the future. I was looking back at some shots when we first moved here in 2003 and then in July 2006 and I can see that my garden has matured and changed a lot.

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    1. Wow, yes 2003 and 2006 would be quite the comparison photos. I feel like mine should be further along since we've been here since 2005. But then the front garden was just maturing when back to back bad winters killed off that version, all new again in 2010. The back garden has been done in such phases that some things are mature when others are not. Such a mix.

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    2. The shots from 2003 were vastly different because our house was a new build and there was nothing but dirt in the back garden, it was literally a blank canvas!

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  10. Your garden always looks divine! The privet lands will become full and lush again!

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  11. Magnificent!
    Jim N. Tabor

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  12. It's hard to balance privacy with too much shade and darkness isn't it ? I was thrilled when the neighbors cut down their dying Magnolia , but my view is now a broad expanse of stucco wall.It will be fun to see that new fence area fill in--I really loved the way it looked on our Fling visit . By the way, your mystery chimney Sedum appears to be Sedum relexum 'Blue Spruce' Thanks for the great tour !

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    1. I never hated the privet, in fact I should have just really hacked it back years ago and maybe we could have lived with it. Thank you for the kind words about the fence area and the sedum ID!

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  13. I forgot how many amazing plants you have Loree. I absolutely love your garden. It looks fantastic! And as if it weren't perfect enough, of course you have non-stop flowering water lilies.

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    1. Thank you Amy, I feel the same about your garden (okay minus the water lilies).

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  14. How do you keep your stock tank from becoming a mosquito farm? Do you use mosquito dunks? Your garden is super cool and so well designed - chainmail optional. ;o)

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    1. There are mosquito fish in there (gambusia), I have used dunks in other standing water places though. A dish garden and a pot without drainage.

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  15. I think it looks great--especially the north side, the veggie garden, and the patio. Oh, and all your geometric potted plants--very impressive! Love the Imperata, Cotinus, and Sempervivum.

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  16. I love your garden, just said that in an earlier message. Would love to sit in it and look at your fantastic combinations. I admire your creativity so much!!!

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    1. I'd invite you over but I see that you're in the UK, thank you for the kind words.

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    2. I might be over your way one day. We are going to the US in Sept., but not your part. 😢

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  17. Really enjoyed the tour, valuable for you, valuable for the readers, esp. those that just saw it but were too dazed to take in all the details! And thanks for the tip on Sungold.

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    1. I've heard the Sungold compared to candy and once you try one you'll understand why.

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  18. sandy lawrenceAugust 22, 2014

    Patio shot is PRIMO!

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  19. It's hard to imagine that you will ever look back at this post and think "how far we've come" but I'm sure it will be so. Can't keep a creative spirit and plantaholic down! You may do it for you, but thanks for letting the rest of us in on the fun.

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    1. Oh gosh, I want to look back and marvel at how open everything was (meaning by this time next year everything will have grown in), not likely. But eventually.

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  20. i realy love all the parts of your garden and your amazing collection of potted plants

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    1. Thank you so much, as you can see it's a bit of an addiction.

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  21. There are not enough adjectives to describe your creative talent for arranging your large collection of wonderful plants and lovely containers so I'll just say; simple amazing! Thank you for the tour, and for the tours of the past, and those yet to come.

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  22. your garden is WONDERFUL !!!!!! I'd love to have a garden like that, alas it is not possible here in Northern Europe !

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    1. Ah but you have grapes and passionflower fruit!

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  23. I see that your Azolla has divided and conquered too! Everything looks beautiful!

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    1. Actually it's decreased it's numbers the last couple of weeks, I don't know if the fish are eating it or what's going on! Thanks...

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  24. Your garden is beautiful, and stylish. You should be proud.

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