Monday, March 31, 2014

The Testa-Vought Garden, a stop on the 2013 Garden Blogger’s Fling...

This garden was the last stop on a (long, hot) Saturday of garden fun last June. We were told the garden was designed by Bernard Trainor (a little name dropping, understandable) but it was obvious from the moment we stepped foot in the garden this was also a space loved and utilized by the home owners. Of course I started snapping photos the moment we got off the bus, out on the street.

But things really got interesting once we went behind the wall…

Yes this is a walled garden, something I covet dearly.

While it starts off tame, even a little sparse...

It gradually ramps up the excitement level...

Until you come face to face with this...

Oh California...

I'm not sure the kitty shared my California love on this hot day.

Scott and Peter, they seem to have shown up in a few of my photos from the Fling.

Going through and editing these photos now, 9 months post-Fling, this image (below) filled my heart with joy. Why? I remember everything in every garden as being the very picture of perfection. Not a leaf out of place...but look! There is debris in the plant, on the gravel top dressing and the surrounding paving. My garden is going to be a stop on the Portland Fling this summer and I can say with great confidence there will be a lot more of this, and a lot less perfection. May everyone look with a forgiving (and understanding) eye.

Monster Agave attenuata!

And that banksia! I presumed to know which it was at one time, but now I'm just confused by its beauty.

Amazing.

Oh hey, here's something I can grow! Eryngium, not sure which one.

Okay it's time to leave, I've retracing my steps towards the front.

But not before I look up and spy another monster Pineapple Guava. Wow, these really are trees.

It was the bloom that gave it away.

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

31 comments:

  1. How did you manage to get a shot of the pool with no one in it? I loved this post, there was so much I didn't notice in that garden, because my brain and body were just so fried from the heat. I'm very much looking forward to seeing your garden on the Fling! Goodness, a perfect, unblemished garden? No one has that (at least, not without a fleet of expensive gardeners to help).

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    1. I think I was reaching my saturation point for being with people in close quarters. My "loner" instincts kicked in and I walked on ahead of the group and thus was able to capture the pool before it became a cooling station. Pure luck!

      Thank you for the words of garden encouragement, I am looking forward to having everyone here!

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  2. In retrospect, this was my favorite garden on the Fling tour. I think it was because it was restrained, yet exuberant, and had the privacy factor that I always covet. Oh, and of course, the plant selection to die for - thanks for the warm-up on this overcast March morning!

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    1. Indeed even though it was smack dab in a neighborhood you certainly couldn't tell once you were inside. Oh how lovely that would be.

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  3. You got some nice shots! The bright sun defeated me a bit with my photos. I'm also glad that you showed pics of the outside and walled gardens. I admired those but didn't stop to look closely. I must have been headed for the shade. Oh, and please don't worry about your garden having to be perfect on the Fling. No gardener would ever expect that, and we'll all be too busy drooling over your wonderful plants and garden design to notice any imperfections.

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    1. You are kind Pam, we shall see.

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  4. Walled garden envy: I'm not the only one then!

    Love the overhead beams -- not sure I should call it a "pergola". Some great stuff here!

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    1. There were copies of an old issue of Pacific Horticulture which featured this garden available for us to take. I did, and as I recall the article spoke about that structure. Explaining it's "purpose"...sure wish I could remember it.

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  5. It's interesting to see so many of the plants in our own garden in this post but the one that made the biggest impression is the 2nd photo of the well-trimmed Yucca elepantipes - it looks a whole lot better than the monster that spans the boundary of our slope. Coincidentally, my husband began trimming it back this weekend to give the surrounding plants more light and better air circulation - we barely made a dent in it. If not maintained like the one in your photo, it turns into a Yucca forest.

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    1. Yucca forest doesn't sound so bad, but then again that specimen is pretty amazing!

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  6. Is that Banksia grandis? Thanks for bringing the sun! We've got a little of our own this morning finally! Hooray! I also really enjoyed this garden, its walls and great plants! Loree, your garden is gorgeous and everyone will be really excited to see your groovy plants and admire your great design! I'm excited to see it again!

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    1. I don't know, the leaves don't look quite right for Banksia grandis, but then again what do I know? I can't believe you've only been here once Peter...

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  7. I didnt see much of this garden as I think I was getting heat stroke and I ended up spending the visit sitting with my feet in the pool so I am grateful toyou for sharing your photos as I can see now all the plants that I love and missed

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    1. It's a shame that the heat interfered with so many peoples enjoyment of this garden. Here's hoping that (or rain!) is not the case this year.

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  8. A glamorous looking garden with that pool, gorgeous planting, and structures. Very tasteful as well!

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    1. It really was lovely, and the kind owners had refreshments out for us as well!

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    2. That refreshment idea sounds like one that needs to become a Fling tradition... ;)

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  9. Great photos! Lovely, lush garden! I love that closeup of the red/orange flower. That's a grevillea? Ditto your thoughts on walled gardens. Would love to have one too!

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    1. It is a grevillea, maybe Grevillea 'Superb'...

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  10. What a great looking garden.

    The planting and sunshine is so completely different to here at the moment as the wind is coming in from the North Sea and shrouding us in haar, it's been a dreich few days.

    So, how hot was it when you visited?

    The pool looks great and I have never seen Banksia flowers before. They look as mad as the leaves, ha ha!

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    1. At the very least it was in the upper 90's...very likely over the 100 degree mark. Everyone was so overheated from our stop at Filoli earlier they lined the pools edge with pants rolled up and feet submerged. That banksia was drop dead gorgeous. I so wish I could grow them here!

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  11. This garden is a dream! Love the grevillea resting in the arms of the agave, like A LOT. I too am a walled garden lover....preferably a walled garden with bougainvillea draped over it. Sigh. If only....Kiersten

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    1. I realized I put in two images of that scene, almost identical, but I couldn't help myself, it spoke to me too.

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  12. I think I could almost tolerate the heat if I could just move right in to that house and garden. The pool would be a major hangout.

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    1. The homes design (long and low with tall trees around) seemed to speak to cool spaces inside too.

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  13. double -damn , I wish I'd had my camera in this garden !

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    1. I wonder just how many cameras you'll be bringing to Portland?

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  14. Wow!!!! I don't know if I can live any longer without a pool and garden around it like this one.

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    1. Will you be moving or simply building one of your own?

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  15. It is an elegant garden. The Banksia is probably B. speciosa, avail. at smgrowers. Just FYI, heat like that day's isn't normally a common occurrence here in the Bay Area, and usually only lasts 2 to 4 days before the fog returns to cool things back down. Plus, it's even rarer to stay warm into the evening.
    David in Berkeley

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    1. I think that's why the heat was so difficult for so many of the attendees. They were coming from HOT parts of the country and looking for a little of that famous Bay Area fog and cool.

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