Friday, March 7, 2014

A bright evergreen trio, my favorite plants in the garden, this week…

It’s time to tie-up some loose-ends. I took these photos a while back intending to feature them as favs, but then something better (bigger, flashier) would catch my eye and they were pushed aside. With spring coming lots things are going to start shouting for my attentions so I wanted to feature these tiny wonders before it’s too late. Fist up a pair of polypodium, P. scouleri

And P. guttatum

These small ferns were planted last spring, here’s the P. scouleri newly purchased…

As the surrounding ferns, hosta and rodgersia grew they became hidden from view, revealing themselves only in late fall when the others disappeared. They offer a bright green respite from all the bare soil. I need to plant more of both! Polypodium scouleri...

P. scouleri, description from Cistus Nursery
One of the loveliest West Coast ferns, often seen growing on sea stacks or the occasional jagged arm of an ancient redwood along the coast. The 8-10", shiny evergreen fronds form clumps and slowly spread. Perfect for the garden understory, wall planting, yes, even your first green wall. Very summer drought tolerant but growth can be increased with summer moisture. Surprisingly frost hardy, to 0F, USDA zone 7. As yet rare in cultivation.

Polypodium guttatum...

P. guttatum, description from Xera Plants
Small clumping evergreen fern with deeply incised rounded leaves that offer a stupendous texture for deep shade to shade. Spreading tightly it will form upright colonies in time. Curiously the leaves are held completely perpendicular- a fine effect. To 8-10" tall in time and spreading at a moderate pace to form colonies several feet across. A charming and unusual fern. Zn7a (0º to 5ºF) Dryopteracae

My third fav is a small perennial which I tend to have a love/hate relationship with (a tiny bit of it snuck into the Polypodium guttatum photo above). Right now we’re in the love phase…

In my experience Acorus gramineus 'Ogon' tends to either look really good, or really bad. Last spring while revamping the former hydrangea bed (now schefflera land) I came really close to getting rid of a whole bunch of it. Instead I replanted it all in the stock tank with the tetrapanax, thinking it would make a nice ground cover if it filled in. It’s got a ways to go but is looking good.

Acorus gramineus 'Ogon', descrption from Secret Garden Growers
Versatile evergreen groundcover with upright, narrow, golden striped, grassy foliage to 12" - Slow spreading mat is a great choice to brighten a dark part of the woodland garden…also happy streamside or even submerged in a pond! Acorus prefers a moist to wet site...the spot where everything else dies!

What's your favorite plant in your garden this week?

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

25 comments:

  1. I have a variegated Acorus out there that I love. Maybe I'll bring some to the plant exchange. I love Polypodium scouleri too. Great plants!

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    1. Do you find that it needs a lot of moisture?

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    2. I have it in a low spot, so it gets a lot of moisture. It's doing well there. I've never tried it in a spot that has good drainage, so I can't really say.

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  2. Coincidentally, I put 3 of that same Acorus in my new bed this week, after flirting with the plant in the nursery off and on for some time. I still have apprehensions about its water needs, although Monterey Bay's tag says it needs only "regular" water (but, then here in the land of drought I'm not entirely sure what "regular" water means anymore). My favorite selection this week is also a smaller-sized plant: http://krispgarden.blogspot.com/2014/03/my-favorite-plant-this-week-uncinia.html

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    1. I really didn't water the acorus much last summer, whenever the tetrapanax started to look a little limp I'd give it a good soaking but there is no way the soil could be considered moist, I bet yours will be fine.

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  3. A great trio. I share your love/hate relationship with acorus! During part of the summer mine gets rust spots all over it and I decide that it's time for it to go; right now it somehow looks pristine. Go figure. I cheated with my favoirte and used a group of house plants. http://outlawgarden.blogspot.com/2014/03/sansevierias-my-favorite-plantthis-week.html

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    1. Wow I've never seen the rust spots, something for me to watch out for! And your houseplant use isn't cheating!

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  4. 20'? Can that be for real? I'm talkin bout P. guttatum and thinking it must be a typo (I make them all the time but you rarely do, so I must ask)
    My acorus ground cover is filling in nicely in just one year. It was made from divisions of just two plants from Home Depot.
    Love the ferns. Here's what I love at home: http://bannersbyricki.com/archives/3616

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    1. You give me too much credit, both for not making typos regularly and for thinking I'd actually retype that description. Nope it was a copy paste straight from the Xera website. You've got me wondering now though...I'll ask!

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    2. Good catch Ricki, Greg says 8-10" max...I made the change.

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    3. It still says feet. But 8-10' is closer than 20!

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    4. Lordy! Good catch, just call me oblivious...

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  5. Love the Polypodium guttatum! And the Acorus in the stock tank was a good move -- looks cool even though it's a bit thin!

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    1. Perhaps I need to be sure to give it more water throughout our coming summer. It would be amazing all filled in!

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  6. I love your ferns. I could see those used in string gardens. That trio could be quite nice hanging about in a shady corner.

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    1. Have you made string gardens Louis?

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  7. I grow P. scouleri in my garden, it's a wonderful wee fern. The other I am unfamiliar with. As for the Acorus - I was advised to grow it in my small shady pond - it's been a complete failure! I do like how you've underplanted the tetrapanax - make quite a statement under there.
    I've not joined in with your plant of the week meme yet! I must get myself organised more!

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    1. Oh I hope you will, I love learning of other peoples favorites!

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  8. I am really interested in P. Scouleri, lovely looking fern :)

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    1. It is! I wish it grew faster and I would divide it and share!

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  9. Love your trio, especially the ferns. I think P. scouleri is the fern growing on the big trees in Beards Hollow on the Long Beach Peninsula, though I could swear the fronds get longer than that. Maybe it's just the massive size some of the clumps attain.

    I did multiple favorites this week, too! http://practicalplantgeek.blogspot.com/2014/03/rex-begonias-my-favorite-plantthis-week.html

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    1. Glad you approve of the trio, off to discover your favs!

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  10. I too have a love affair with P. scouleri - I find that they do ok with little water, by the way. I had three in a small wooden container and they spread and grew well. Little to no sun, really small container so it did get very dry during summers (they are now planted in the ground). I think they are pretty tough in my experience.

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  11. Fine choices Loree, especially the P. guttatum which I've jotted down.

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  12. I love the ferns, they look like they belong on a rainforest floor. I don't think I'd be able to keep them as wet as they'd like, and have lost a few more plants in the past couple of weeks (grr) that should be much tougher than that! But I digress... Very nice trio!
    My favourite: http://crmbsgrdn.blogspot.com.au/2014/03/my-favourite-plant-in-garden-this-week_9.html

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