Monday, March 10, 2014

The monster agave, it’s still looking good…

I finally remembered to drive by my favorite monster agave, previously featured here and here. Knowing it has been through other severe cold and snow events over the years I figured it would probably be okay, but an in person confirmation was needed…

Looking good! There are signs the owners have already been out cleaning up the garden, everything looks so tidy. Lots of new containers line the stairway.

Oh those agaves…

Perhaps this year I’ll remember to return for a high summer visit.

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

25 comments:

  1. They don't give them any special winter treatment? Is it just good drainage? They really are pretty fantastic.

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    1. Just good drainage, and genes...

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  2. It's heartening to see that mature specimens in the right location are that hardy. Looking at the sad state of that little pup you gave me last summer makes me wish for a south-facing slope! (But just for the drainage, not for the mountain-goat gardening action!)

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    1. Ya that whole twisting your ankle and tumbling down the rocks thing doesn't sound so good but my-oh-my how wonderful it would be to have agaves like that in your garden!

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  3. those are incredible, do you know what variety they are?

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    1. No definitive ID, the owners weren't able to tell me. The local experts I've consulted say probably Agave salmiana ferox.

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  4. I'm so glad that they are all so healthy and beautiful!

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  5. Their size makes a huge difference to their hardiness but my oh my they look pristine too! A fabulous escapist mediterranean inspired garden!

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    1. They really do look pristine, and no signs of recently chopped leaves either.

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  6. I don't think I've ever seen an agave that big! Perfect placement.

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    1. Really? But you're in the land of agaves!

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  7. These folks didn't let any of those are sun breaks go to waste...puts my puny tidying up efforts to shame. The Agaves are spectacular.

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    1. I thought the same thing, so crisp and tidy!

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  8. I think it's Agave salmiana. They look great. In fact, the entire hillside looks fantastic. Is it as steep as it looks in your photos?

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    1. It is that steep! Remind me when you're here and if there's time I'll drive you by this garden.

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  9. Things are looking positive there - no newcomers who want to plant it all in lawn and other "proper plants"! Adding pots is also a good sign. The groupings in the last 2 photos with the yellow house, are stunning to say the least...

    Gardening on a steep hill is underrated:-)

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    1. If I drove by and saw the house had sold and the garden had been ripped out, well I don't know what I would do but it wouldn't be pretty.

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  10. WOW!!!!!!!!! Those agave, that pindo palm!!! What an incredible garden!!!!

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  11. btw, 2nd photo, above the red pot (nearly centre) with the opuntia, I spot what appears to be a jubaea chilensis? Either that or small canary island date palm. Do my eyes deceive me or is there another horticultural gem hiding out there?

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    1. Oh Louis I wish I could answer with authority, I can not. I guess you'll just need to come down to Portland to check it out for yourself!

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  12. I want I want I want!!
    Jim NE Tabor

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  13. What an immaculate garden! The agaves look wonderful. Looks like a lot of lavender, too. I bet it's beautiful when that hillside is in bloom.

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