Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The aeoniums, a follow-up...

Does this house look familiar?

Last time I was here the skies were blue, the sedum was blooming and the bare spots were filled with aeoniums, sound familiar? Now the sky is PNW grey and the tenders have all been lifted for the winter.

Yikes! Not everything got moved in time. This agave was left in place and is showing how it feels about that...

The homeowner was reluctant to wrestle with such a lethal beast and got bum advice from a local nursery that said as long as it was dry it should be fine in the ground. Luckily he has a fine looking pup from this plant which is safely tucked away...

Here! I ended my last post about this garden saying I hoped to be invited back to see how his porch greenhouse turned out, and here I am. Look at all those happy plants!

Dale, the homeowner, contacted Cyclone Canvas (they custom design exterior boat covers, car covers, and equipment covers for marine, residential, and commercial applications) to create these zippered panels which fit over a metal framework he built himself. Since they are zippered he can open them up on warm days in the spring.

The plants are very happy inside and the light is wonderful (if you page up you can see the ceiling is a translucent material).

In this shot you can see a bit of the metal frame and how the panels are connected.

The poinsettia add a festive holiday touch!

Dale asked if I knew why this happens on Cycads, the yellowing of blades in random spots. Anyone know?

Just as I started to ask if he ever broke off bits of the plants when digging and repotting we moved outside, beyond the patio enclosure, to a second space built over a planting bed off the back of the garage. Here is where the broken pieces go, to root and grow into new plants.

From the opposite side, as you can see several go right into the ground.

That red banana must have been fun to move!

Here's a shot of the entire set-up. Doesn't it look fabulous? If you look close you can see the vents in the upper end of the patio enclosure. This was done right...

The fountain is new since my last visit, a Craigslist find.

It's the perfect size for this pond, which will be filled with water-loving plants come spring.

Dale kindly pointed out another missed plant, here's what an aeonium looks like after 12F...

Finally I had to share these little guys, don't you just love them?

Thanks Dale, for inviting me back to see your garden in the winter. And kudos to you and Cyclone Canvas for creating such a fabulous home for your plants over the winter months.

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

24 comments:

  1. That's a great way to enclose plants in the winter. Poor agave, at least there is a spare. I have noticed that the variegated ones are less tolerant of cold even in our more hospitable and drier climate.

    Interestingly, I just visited with a gardener in my neighborhood who had similar roll up sides made for her porch. I think the guy she used makes them for restaurants. Love this idea.

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    1. I can imagine setting out in that enclosed space on a sunny day would be just about heaven!

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  2. That setup is fabulous! I love how the plastic is even color-coordinated with the house. I deliberately left a handful of little tender succulents out as well. They have a major case of the uglies now.

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    1. The color was so well chosen it just all blends, the exact opposite of the ubiquitous blue tarp.

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  3. That set up is amazing and such a clever solution. Here a lot of people wrap their tenders with straw or bubble wrap end fleece.
    Good to meet you this year

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    1. I've seen a lot of straw used here too, to protect the pseudo-stems on bananas usually. This way, to be able to enjoy your plants all winter, what a treat.

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  4. Nice! Loree, do I see a v3 of your shade pavilion/winter greenhouse design coming? ;)

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    1. I wish! Maybe for the next house...

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  5. Wow, that is the most esthetically pleasing solution I've ever seen. I wonder how much it cost?

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    1. You know I believe he mentioned a figure (which I honestly can't remember) but I do recall thinking that it sounded very reasonable for the quality and quantity they did.

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  6. okay then. that's doing it right. impressive. love the follow up.

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    1. Maybe off the back of your new digs?

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  7. Loved the follow up, thank you!

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    1. You're very welcome thank you for stopping by!

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  8. Once again, I'm struck by the amount of work you face up that way getting ready for winter - and then again, for spring! I feel downright lazy by comparison.

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    1. Not everyone up here in the PNW is so crazy/passionate as myself and these folks. There are those insane souls who actually garden in their zone...

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  9. What a set up ! What does he use as a heat source ? Thanks for sharing this with us Loree, very inspirational...

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    1. He says just simple space heaters.

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  10. As always, this garden is a treat to see but yowsa, the cool covering is the bee's knees! Thanks for sharing Dale's great garden!

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    1. The bee's knees...you always make me smile Peter.

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  11. Good set up and blends in with the house almost seamlessly. Merry Christmas to you and Andrew!

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    1. The neighbors certainly are lucky to have such an aesthetically pleasing solution to look at all winter!

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