Thursday, December 12, 2013

Sold!

Misery loves company right? And so earlier this week I thought I’d stop by that favorite neighborhood garden of mine and see how their plants are handling the cold, mainly the opuntia. Looks like it's napping.

One thing I should mention…it sold.

I took a few more photos simply to capture the garden as it is now, before the new owners make changes.

Seeing those pads laying on the sidewalk you're probably wondering if I helped myself to a couple, aren't you? Well I didn't. I know, what was I thinking?


It looks like a few plants might have been removed already, maybe by the previous owner or friends, I’ve never noticed so much bare soil..

Things still looked really good, especially considering we weren't yet out of the deep freeze (I think it was about 23F when I was taking these shots).

There were also signs of a little pre-closing work that had been done, on pipes or some such. All in all the workers seemed to have done a good job of not trashing the place.

I wonder if the new owners were warned the garden came with a stalker? (me) Can you imagine buying into a garden with this many amazing specimens? Of course I would have jumped at the chance (the house is pretty sweet too). But at the price it was going for I would have had to ask you all to move in to help make the house payment.

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

37 comments:

  1. I think you should leave a note taped to the front door for the new owners, offering them a free consult with you in case they aren't familiar with the proper care and keeping of this marvelous garden. Then you'll have an "in" if they decide to get rid of anything, or make changes.

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    1. Great idea Alison! Although it does remind me of the note I slipped in the mailbox years ago when I wanted to know the story behind the garden, the owner never got it! Luckily though as it turned out we had a mutual friend (this is Portland, about 3 degrees of separation) and a personal tour occurred.

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  2. Still looks great, even though it may be down a few plants.

    Whenever I see a gardener's house like this sell, it gives me hope that someday somebody will be excited to inherit my garden -- they'll see it as one of the selling points of the house as opposed to "something that will have to be dealt with".

    p.s. I would have taken the Opuntia pads and left a note saying that you had them, were keeping them safe, and they could be picked up at any time. Of course include your phone number or email address. If I were a gardener moving into a new neighborhood I'd love to know that other plant lovers lived in the area. :)

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    1. Indeed, to know that your garden was going to be appreciated would make leaving it easier. I also like your idea about the pads. Maybe I'll go by today and see if they're still there...

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  3. Awesome garden and it works great with the house style. I'd think the new owners would have to like the garden in order to buy the house but then again I've learned all too well recently it doesn't always work that way so we'll be watching to see.

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    1. They certainly do seem like a matched pair, the garden and the house. Hopefully the new owners agree!

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  4. fifi lafontaineDecember 12, 2013

    ...But, but, that's MY HOUSE!

    Dang, so someone has bought my fantasy ranch, eh? Well, the new owners are in for a slew of yard stalkers!

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    1. Yours and mine both. We should have got our act together and shared.

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  5. I like Alison's idea. I hope the new owners love the garden because it's a treasure! Looking forward to you posting more about this one!

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  6. Wow, this would be a wonderful garden to move into. Lots of great plant material to start with! If only I were in the market for a house in Portland...

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  7. Alison's idea is brilliant. I'd feel sick if the new owners replaced the garden with turf. I'm crossing my fingers that a gardener snapped up their dream garden/house. I giggle every time I see a loose opuntia pad on your blog, because it reminds me of the time that you knocked on that lady's door to ask for one. :-)

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    1. Turf! OMG, I hadn't even thought of that. I'd probably pass out.

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  8. For a moment I thought you guys sneakily put your house on the market and will be moving somewhere else!

    I hope the new owners will keep and maintain the existing garden but do keep a close eye for the next few months just in case they don't and they get rid of the plants. You can give some of them a wonderful new home in case they do the unthinkable.

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    1. I don't think I am capable of keeping a secret like that!

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  9. drooling! that is seriously amazing. If I had money, I would buy that house based on an emotional impulse alone. Unfortunately, I don't live in Portland, or have any money. But its still fun to dream. Hope the new owners are spiky lovers. Maybe they purchased the house out of pure plant lust alone!?

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    1. It could be, although that house is AMAZING midcentury perfection.

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  10. If only I could have told you, "I bought it!" And with the some things missing, you could almost see that true, me editing a touch... Oh well, not me moving to the PNW.

    Very nice pics, cannot wait to re-read this post. The health of everything is what got my attention the most...those plants look every but as happy as the same ones I see here, but the arrangement is divine. I remember you posting on this before... the cork-screwy plant in photo #9 is so cool.

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    1. That would be pretty fabulous David! #9 is a Sophora prostrata 'Little Baby' - dumb name, cool plant.

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  11. Maybe they were sold on the garden and just had to have the house to get the garden. I would imagine you will be heading over there with a housewarming gift and I bet I know what it will be.

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  12. These people have obviously been following your blog and will do anything to get on your good side. Fame has its price, dontcha know.

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    1. Hahaha, that's pretty good ricki.

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  13. Leaving the note might work out well if the new owners don't actually like the landscaping and want to remove it and plant grass. My edible landscaping in San Diego met that fate. The landscaping looks very low maintenance though, so maybe it was a big draw, I would hope so.

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    1. It is pretty darn low maintenance, as long as you have a set of long tweezers.

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  14. Someone bought a house with a killer garden! Go with Allison's idea. Cozy up to them; it will be a win-win.

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    1. It will have to be a delicate balance. I don't want to scare them!

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  15. What an extraordinary garden to acquire. I hope they appreciate it. Do you know what the plant is in the photo 8 (I think) up from the bottom? It looks like a plant I have and have not been able to identify. Brown stems, tiny leaves, not a Corokia.

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    1. It's a Sophora prostrata 'Little Baby'...love that plant! I have two but both of mine are small.

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  16. Well who wouldn't want to buy a house like that?

    PLANT ALERT - is that a SUCCULENT EUPHORBIA I see that has survived the freeze? You must find out more about this!

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    1. It is...of course when I was there we were still below freezing (day 5) but I will look back to see how its doing now that we've thawed. That house is situated perfectly to block the wind and the garden faces south. Whatever sun might shine warms the brick and there is a roof overhang over the planter. I've seen things survive in this garden that parish elsewhere in town. TBC...

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    2. Well that does help, but still... that's pretty amazing if it survives!

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  17. Awesome garden, I would buy it too, although It is much more fun to start it from zero, don´t you think?

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    1. Nope, not in this case! To inherit that garden would be a dream.

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  18. How could anyone leave Yucca rostrata behind? Leave children, take Y. rostrata.

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    1. Haha no children and he was moving to a condo. Condo = no space for a specimen Y. Rostrata, sadly.

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