Friday, April 27, 2018

Walking the Coulée verte René-Dumont / aka Promenade Plantée, Paris

The Coulée verte René-Dumont or Promenade plantée (French for tree-lined walkway) or the Coulée verte (French for green course) is a 2.9 mile elevated linear park built on top of obsolete railway infrastructure in the 12th arrondissement of Paris, France. It was inaugurated in 1993 (source). You might say it's the Parisian version of NYC's Highline, although since the Highline opened some 16 years later I suppose it would be more accurate to call the Highline NYC's version of the Promenade plantée. Got that?

This looks pretty bleak doesn't it? It get's better, I promise.

While my gardener's heart was tempted, once again, to mourn the fact my visit was in January, not April, there was still plenty of beauty to be found here.

In addition to winter garden interest, it was also quite nice to be up above the traffic, a view that provided glimpses of the street scenes below as well as a different perspective on the buildings surrounding the elevated walkway.

I do love it when a vine becomes more significant than the structure holding it. At least when it's not in my garden.

So many chimney pots!
Euphorbia and Mahonia combo, just like home...

Did you notice this great fountain (for dogs and water bottles?) in the photo above?

I swear I've seen this gorgeous building in a film or maybe an advertisement.

Every neighborhood should have a bamboo tunnel, right?

Should you feel the urge to stop and work-out mid-walk no worries, get to it! (there was a staircase down from the promenade)

I am drawn to patterns.

So do you think there once was a building next to this one?

There were a few of these spaces off to the side of the main walkway. All featured bright paintings, and all but this one had people sitting on the bench, so I didn't snap photos.

A greenhouse?

This is the interesting building I shared a photo of yesterday, you definitely get a better view from up high.

Another shot of "Ground Control"...

I wonder if they put water plants in the ponds in springtime?

Something about this set-up kind gave me the shivers.

I just imagine mildew and spiders. I don't know why.

Another view of the interesting planted wall you saw yesterday.

Grevillea!

Gomphocarpus physocarpus

I wonder what's under the frost cloth?

My money is on a nice big Agave.

No, I didn't climb up there and peek.

Feel like a came of checkers or chess?

Our walk — and thus my posts on Paris— is about to come to an end.

I do hope to make it back someday, in more favorable garden weather.

Then again this is a big world and there are so many places to see!

Weather Diary, April 26: Hi tbd, Low tbd/ Precip tbd

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden (dg). Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

20 comments:

  1. That first picture of the sign for the Tree-lined Green Course Promenade", does it say No Dog Walking (bottom left drawing)? That would be so peculiar for a public walkway. What it should say instead is No Graffiti.
    Those black railed balconies make me want to move in. Even (or especially) into that corner unit of the sliced, odd and magnificent building.

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    1. Yes I believe you read that symbol correctly, and it does seem like an odd restriction.

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  2. Fascinating garden walk! Those enormous statues with the cut-through are crazy. I bet there's a big Agave in that frost cloth too. The plastic-wrapped balcony looks to me like the urban Parisian version of your pergola greenhouse, but not as well-engineered (they don't have an Andrew). I hope there's a lot more fabulous international travel in your future!

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    1. Andrew is scheming on a Mexico City adventure next year, we shall see...

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  3. So interesting that conceptually one can compare this to the HighLine but it is so very French in execution. Even in January it is pretty spectacular.

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    1. Have you been to the Highline Linda?

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  4. It's been a pleasure walking through Paris with you and what better way to end your Paris posts than with a visit to this urban garden. That plastic-covered balcony looks like it might be housing an interesting collection of plants. It does look a little creepy. Maybe it's better inside?

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    1. It probably is better inside, or maybe even more creepy?

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  5. I love this elevated garden course, beautifully planted and the height offers a unique view so different than at street level.
    Maybe you could lead garden tours to various cities? Many plant people do that. I once met a woman in Bellagio, Italy who did that so she could travel. I thought it a great idea!

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    1. After helping to host the Garden Bloggers Fling here in Portland, back in 2014, I can honestly say that hosting a garden tour would be one of my worst nightmares!

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  6. Thank you for showing this. Of all my friends who have visited Paris, not one has mentioned it, so I didn't know it existed. It looks wonderful.

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    1. I wouldn't have known about it if not for asking for tips from friends on Facebook. I'm so glad I did!

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  7. Fascinating to learn of this predecessor to the High Line. I have always thought it (the High Line) originated out of the blue, and I was always so shocked by that. It took SO much political will, and money, to achieve that thing. It practically takes a miracle for people to try something that has never been done before. Now I see they had this little spark of example. And how MUCH differently the High Line turned out, especially due to the plantings, and the willingness to give it a wild look. I wouldn't even know this park you photograph was different than any other park in the city. They didn't highlight the old railroad line in the least. Thus another difference from NY, where they featured it.

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    1. Excellent point Alyse, the difference between using the railroad as part of the design or completely ignoring it. I really need to get to the Highline soon.

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  8. That's a neat urban place to walk. Must be really beautiful about now, end of April...

    Funny to see a Grevillea there!

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    1. Yes I imagine in April it is magnificent.

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  9. It's a great green space, winter or no. I really like the planted wall and I'm curious about that building with the huge figures adorning it. Do you know if it housed offices or living quarters?

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    1. I don't know. Wish I could have toured it.

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  10. You never know when that golden opportunity may happen again, and perhaps the timing will be good too that we can meet up there! Have taken note of this place as funny enough we didn’t even know this existed till you mentioned it. Very interesting place and would love to see it in person.

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    1. You'll have to check it out on your next Parisian adventure! And I suppose you're right. Since this trip came out of the blue another could as well.

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