Thursday, December 21, 2017

Visiting the United States Botanic Garden

The US Botanic Garden was my last stop on The National Mall, after a long, hot, humid day spent touring gardens in Washington DC last June. Even though I was low on energy and high on cantankerous (can't think of a better word) I still couldn't help but find some joy in this image. Our Capitol Building with a lovely garden just mere feet away. I wonder if any of those uptight politicians ever take a moment and walk around the garden? I know, chances are slim, very slim...

But enough about them, let's look at the plants...

There's a map of the garden here, if you want to see how it's laid out. I tried to walk some discernible path but ended up bouncing around.

Comptonia peregrina, aka sweet fern.

Wish I could ID the Magnolia and the Coneflower...they look unexpectedly great together.

Cercis canadensis 'The Rising Sun'

The new growth quite colorful.

Sedum ternatum

Anemone virginiana

Opuntia humifusa

I believe that's the National Museum of the American Indian peeking up over the foliage.

And that's part of the National Botanic Garden Conservatory.

These cement planters were huge.

There are a couple of people for scale. Huge!

Let's go inside the conservatory...

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus)

Carica papaya

Eucomis

Vachellia cornigera, aka Bullhorn Acacia

Glad I was there for the spectacle (read the sign)...

Looking up...

Graptopetalum paraguayense with Cleistocactus winteri

Aloe marlothii

Agave parryi

There were so many amazing Cycads!

Huperzia squarrosa

I'm not sure if this is Encephalartos longifolius

Or this is.

Or maybe both?

Datura metel.

That's a wrap on the US Botanic Garden (wrap, get it?...)

Weather Diary, Dec 20: Hi 46, Low 30/ Precip .03"

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

21 comments:

  1. It really is such a pleasant break to see these images now when there is nothing blooming in my area. I am enjoying them more than when everyone was posting at the same time. I think that coneflowers is 'pallida' which has those droopy petals and is pale pink. It is the one I keep thinking I will try growing for the contrast with other plants.

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    1. I never understand the rush to get home and post about all the Fling gardens. I enjoy taking my time and reflecting on them over a period of months. Glad you enjoyed these photos and thanks for the ID!

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  2. Is there a difference between a Botanic garden and a Botanical garden?
    There are some great plants in the conservatory, a few that you probably wish you could grow. The Bullhorn Acacia is beautiful and right down scary.

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    1. I think it's just a choice of grammar, no real difference in mission or focus. And yes, I would love to be able to grow quite a few of them, the Acacia included!

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  3. This visit inside the conservatory is perfect for this cold morning! Thanks for such a nice taste of summer. Huperzia squarrosa is pretty special. Happy solstice!

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    1. Glad I could provide a bit of summer on the darkest day.

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  4. I agree with Linda that the Echinacea looks like E. pallida, with those thin, droopy petals. I think I love Datura buds even more than the full flower.

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    1. Thank you for the ID confirmation!

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  5. It was great to revisit the US Botanic Garden with you. I was so pooped out by that point in the day, I missed a lot, like that blooming agave and that cool jackfruit. I think I'm in love with Huperzia squarrosa.

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    1. That makes two (or three if we include Peter) of us. I wonder if it would be happy in your garden?

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  6. OK, now this is one of the places I really regret missing because I didn't attend this year. I used to go to DC quite a bit for work, but it was mostly in winter/early spring and very busy, so I never made it to the U.S. Botanic Garden. You've shown how special it is. I'll make sure to stop by next time I'm in town. Great post!

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    1. Hope you make it there soon Beth!

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  7. A national treasure by the looks of your photos, Loree. :)

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  8. Your cantankerous mood didn't fog the camera lens any. Great photos. Wouldn't you love to stroll through that conservatory now that it is cold? I love that datura. I have never seen one this color. Great wrap...

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    1. Yes!!! I would love to be back in that sunshine and heat (or even in the conservatory) for a bit. I grew a similar Datura this year, it was fabulous!
      https://www.google.com/search?q=datura+metel+purple+double&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj6r6rGuZ7YAhXCjlQKHa8HBPUQsAQIPw&biw=1204&bih=610

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  9. This garden was so under the radar for me, I had no idea what to expect--but it was very nice indeed ! It would have been nicer if it was about 20 degrees cooler though. But such is the crap shoot when you visit the east coast in summer. I hope to return to the mall again one day , though I would go in fall.You got many more nice photos than I did !

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    1. I look forward to sharing your fall trip, via your camera.

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  10. Heat and humidity make for miserable exploring but lushness of plantings--that Huperzia squarrosa is thrilling!

    No matter the climate, Agave parrryi always seems to look gorgeous.

    Thanks for enduring the heat and humidity long enough to give us a tour.

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    1. You're welcome. One must make the most of it when you're only there for a limited time...humid heat or not.

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  11. I was pretty cantankerous myself when I got there, but I wish I had taken more time to experience this garden.

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