Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Agaves with rope fringe, that's something you don't see everyday

I've still got things to share from the Washington D.C. area Garden Bloggers Fling last June. I started editing my photos from the U.S. Botanic Garden, and realized these images from the Children's Garden (just outside the Conservatory) were so entertaining they deserved their own post.

I mean it's not everyday you see Agaves, in buckets, with rope fringe, on metal posts. Am I right?

I want to think the perforated metal might mean the posts are heaters? Then again we visited in the summertime, when there was no need for additional heat, and I read the Children's Garden is closed for the winter. Besides, that frayed rope would certainty be flammable.

Someone had a lot of fun designing this and I want to applaud them. Well done! (more photos from the Botanic Garden later in the week).

Weather Diary, Dec 18: Hi 53, Low 47/ Precip .02"

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

24 comments:

  1. You are right. One doesn't see Agaves, in buckets, with rope fringe, on metal posts every day. Or ever. One thing for sure, they look to have excellent drainage. Another thing for sure: you'd love to have metal post like these, and I would love to see what design you'd come up with.

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    1. You know me well! Yes these posts could be used so many different ways!

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  2. I have to agree with the above comment. When I saw these buckets and posts, I wanted to see what you would do with them in your garden. I don't see you doing fringe, but I am curious about the possibilities . . .

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    1. There would be no fringe, you're right. And while Agaves on the top would be fun I definitely wouldn't use those buckets...they're undersized.

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  3. I like the fringe. I have seen agaves planted in many styles of planters but not buckets.

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    1. I agree with Eliza (below), the fringe reminds me of hula skirts.

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  4. You're right that this is not something you see every day. I'm not sure I like the Agaves in buckets. I prefer them in shallow containers.

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    1. The buckets are undersized for the posts, but yet kind of swallow up the Agaves. Still, I give them points for having fun.

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  5. And my question would be, 'why'? So many other possibilities would come to mind with a tiche of time.

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    1. Why is always a good question to ask.

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  6. Replies
    1. It actually does remind me of woody lily skirts, like in arboreal yucca species, or palms not "pineappled" to death in the quest to remove every last frond. But if you know anything about agaves, this could easily look like a root system at first glance, what happens when you let a nursery specimen get pot-bound and then try to carry it away. It's... an odd design decision. Rain chains would strike a more quasi-functional note, I think, but I could grow to like this.

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    2. Are you planning a trip to Hawaii Eliza? Rain chains! That could be very fun Saurs...and I like your comparison to roots or old leaves/fronds.

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    3. No trip planned, unfortunately. My son's girlfriend is Hawaiian (lucky guy is there now!) I wish I was there, too!

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  7. They're unusual to say the least but what really amazes me is how you ferret out things that my eye simply misses - I'm sure I walked through that same area. Maybe I need to start wearing my glasses on my garden jaunts...

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    1. It was so hot and muggy Kris, I think you spent most of your time indoors at the Conservatory didn't you?

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  8. Huh, that is a mystery, for sure. I will have to read the comments to learn if anyone was able to explain it. I've never seen anything like that before.

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    1. Creative minds at work...trying to come up with something to attract the attention of the younger set. I think that's the story...or at least the one I'm sticking to.

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  9. How fun are those? Summer storage for heaters that go elsewhere in the winter?

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    1. Well dang, that's downright logical.

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  10. Agaves with rope fringe, that's something you don't see everyday

    Maybe that's not a bad thing.

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    1. So I guess this won't be showing up in your garden then?

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  11. This is cute, I have a feeling this design was using recyclable items to make a faux Palm Tree and as Agaves as fronds.

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  12. Maybe they're trying to make them look like palm trees???

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