Monday, July 31, 2017

A walk around the Kennedy School gardens

My birthday was a week and a half ago, Andrew took the day off and one of the things we did for our low-key celebration was to walk over to Kennedy School for lunch...

...a nice, long, relaxing lunch in the courtyard. Like many schools back in the day the KS was built with an open air courtyard surrounded by walls on all four sides. My jr. high school (grades 7-9) had a similar set up, only the ground had been paved over and nobody was ever allowed into the space. It was horrifically depressing. The KS courtyard however is not. Even on an uncharacteristically partly cloudy afternoon...

After we finished up our meal I walked around and snapped some photos. Somehow doing so with my phone (it's all I had on me) seemed less intrusive than even my small point and shoot camera. The other diners didn't even look up from their meals...

Even though we eat at the KS at least once a month (probably more like twice, it's so close) I hadn't been in the courtyard for a couple of years. Andrew prefers the comfort of the bar.

Anyone have a guess as to the ID of this charming ground-cover?

I hadn't really thought about how much I miss my Melianthus major 'Antonow's Blue' until I saw this one! (mine disappeared after our harsh winter).

Well, and then seeing my plant again in a photo I sent to the folks at Tommy Bahama, who recently featured a Q&A with me, on their blog. I might have to plant another one...

Dangling vines are always a good thing...

Anyone able to tell me what this plant is?

Here's another shot...

The colors are all sorts of wonky in this image, but that Rhododendron with the Impatiens is nothing short of amazing.

Ha! That Metapanawhat I wrote about last year...

The tile business on the right belongs to their outdoor fireplace. There were people sitting in front of it so I didn't manage to get an overall photo...

Instead I focused on the fabulous Beschorneria potted up on either side...

And the Restio (?)...

Now that's a fun, strange, mix-up...

Time to go find the husband...

Whom I then talked into walking the perimeter of the school (aka the garden) before heading home.

I planted one of these Dryopteris sieboldii last fall, beneath a patch of Syneilesis aconitifolia, I can see one magnificent leaf peeking out. I really need to plant another, or three.

When did they plant the Hakonechloa fest? I love it...

Pseudopanax laetus, out all winter and it lives to talk about it. Amazing! (why do I keep hearing this song when I write "out all winter"???)

Big leaves and orange flowers, it's a win win.

I don't think I'd want these in my garden...

But damn they're fun here.

Acanthus, of some sort.

Flowery flowerness.

Oh those hips!

Wish that I had space for a Rosa glauca.

Painting Allium seed heads seems to be all the rage.

I prefer them au natural.

For this last image I cheat. You see we walked past the KS later in the evening on our way to dinner at Autentica (a few images of that on Instagram) and I couldn't help but stop to snap this magical back-lit photo. How lucky I am to have this gorgeous "public garden" just blocks away!

Weather Diary, July 30: Hi 88, Low 61/ Precip 0 (day 43 no precip)

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

34 comments:

  1. Not many restaurants have such beautiful gardens. We ate at a rooftop garden with planters and I kept walking around to them to check out all the combinations as long as no diners were near them. Just planted a Rosa glauca this spring after many years without one. Those orange lilies are common in the Midwest. I think I have a couple that I forgot I planted. Belated birthday wishes. Sounds like you had a nice day.

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    1. We're lucky out here in that McMenamins is a local chain of restaurants, hotels, theatres that all have great gardens (unless they're in an ultra urban setting). I do love Rosa glauca, well the foliage and the hips at least. I could do without the flowers.

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  2. Happy belated birthday. A nice place to celebrate.
    Hakonechloa fest it is. It had become my favorite grass. I keep adding more of it, slowly replacing others grassed that seed too freely for my liking.

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    1. Hakonechloa is the best! I went through a couple of years where I bought one every time I went to a nursery...

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  3. You are very lucky to have a place like that within easy walking distance! My first thought was that first NOID plant was a Leonotis of some kind, but not very sure. Also, I say "I need to plant that again" every single time I see a Melianthus photo. An annual here but so great!

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    1. Oh Leonotis, now there's a plant I need to find again! (the orange blooming one)

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  4. McMenamin's does such a great job with their gardens! Lucky you to live so close to one of their creations. Nice of them to grow all of those fun things you don't have space for in your own garden. Thanks for the walk around the Kennedy School as it brings back fond memories of the first time we met in person and ate there.

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    1. I forgot all about that meal, what a fun time that was!

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  5. You are very lucky and I think that was a perfect way to spend your birthday afternoon. Congrats on the Tommy Bahamas feature article too! I never knew they had a blog like that. I periodically meet friends at their restaurant in Newport Beach (I used to work in the area) - it has a very nice tropical-style courtyard patio.

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    1. And I never knew they had a restaurant!

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  6. I think your mystery plant might be willow-leaf rudbecia (rudbeckia salicifolia)

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    1. I think you meant Helianthus salicifolia, but it looks like H. maximiliani to me. Big yellow sunflower, in any case.

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    2. Bummer to all of the above. The foliage had such promise!

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  7. Can't help on the plant IDs, but you've reminded me I really want to get up to our McMenamins school in Bothell to see what Riz has done. Maybe I'll finally get up there for MY birthday (in December). My Rosa glauca is taking off this year.

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    1. That's a great idea! Plus maybe a little shopping at Molbaks and Flower World!

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  8. What a great place to have nearby. I've forgotten how close that place is to your garden. All I remember about that McMenamins from the Fling day (besides the plants--the plants I remember) is how incredibly hot it was.

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    1. Hot hot hot! Looking at several days above 100 for this week...

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  9. I have heard so much about this garden but I haven't made it there yet.

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    1. You should plan a meal there, with a stroll around the garden beforehand.

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  10. I think one needs a biiig garden to accommodate the extreme saturation of those tiger lilies. They look fantastic here. All I need is about a 10 x 10 chunk of concrete removed and I could plant one of my wish roses- r.glauca or rosa sericea.

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    1. What are you waiting for? Bye bye concrete....

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  11. Enjoyed this even more than usual...the vines, color, and the *cloudy sky*!

    The Tommy Bahama Q&A a great touch...to think I associated their clothes with narco-cartel guys I used to see in EP! Just a bad coincidence, as Tommy B. gets lifestyles and the finer plants!!

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    1. Glad you enjoyed...and I'll make sure to tell my friend who works at TB about the "narco-cartel guys" tie in...

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  12. john in cranstonAugust 01, 2017

    This was my 1st year with the stately lilium superbum, and they excelled in mid-summer like the native rock stars they are. I am so looking forward to when they mature (and are re-sited)
    Of what is the last back lit image? Seseli libanotis, moon carrot?

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  13. The unknown ground cover might be Eomechon if it has orange sap. And I think the second person was correct about the willow-leafed Helianthus.

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    1. Thanks, Eomecon certainly looks like it could be the one.

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  14. Love that massed Hakonechloa grass. I remember this place from the Portland Fling.

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    1. Hakonechloa is definitely better in groups...

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  15. Oh dear...I've been so out of it that I missed your birthday. Happy Belated!

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  16. Could the groundcover be Rubus irenaeus?

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    1. Yup, 100% agreement on the ID from me.

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