Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Wednesday Vignette: determination


Above: Euphorbia rigida seedlings sprouting in a crack between the foundation and driveway of my neighbor's house. Below: the parents, in my garden.

Approximate distance traveled = 10 feet. Wednesday Vignettes are hosted by Anna at Flutter & Hum.

All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

25 comments:

  1. I love finding valuable "weeds" like this. Surely you'll be finding more soon...

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    1. Spotted a couple yesterday afternoon!

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  2. We must be nuts to spend so much time babying our plants.

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    1. Oh but they're not all so well equipped!

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  3. I just found a Euphorbia myrsinites seedling YEARS after the mother plant died! Determination for sure.

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  4. Such determination. My Euphorbia myrsinites seeds uphill.......

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    1. Do you think it's their powers or projection or ants (or another creature) carrying them?

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    2. I did a quick search and it seems like most Euphorbia employ ballistic seed dispersal, ants or a combination thereof. This article says the E. myrsinites can blast their seeds up to 15 feet! E. rigida looks so similar that I bet it is explosive as well.
      https://extension.usu.edu/weedguides/files/uploads/Euphorbiaceae.pdf

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    3. "ballistic seed dispersal"...excellent words, and they sound like Rice Krispies when they pop! The only reason I thought this might have involved ants was that it would have had to really work to plant itself in that crack.

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  5. I have seen a great number of seedlings along the bottom edge of a curb, growing on the street... Such a valuable garden plant.

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  6. Awesome vignette. Seed distribution is amazing.

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  7. I think it's wonderful that you find plants you like popping up in unexpected spots. My most vigorous self-seeder is the the Albizia julibrissin, intent as always on world domination.

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    1. I wonder if this is the year mine blooms for the first time? (hope not)

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  8. Aw, I love to find a little offspring of a beloved plant. I'm sure you will nurture it well!

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    1. But it's not mine to nurture, since it's growing out of my neighbors house!

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  9. this is a plant I adore but in Utah it has become if not illegal then taboo to plant it. Each year parties of volunteers pull thousands of them from the hills. I wish I could take a few home but would prefer not to get shot (with deadly stares!).

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    1. That was Euphorbia myrsinites around here for awhile, impossible to find for sale anywhere because it had gotten out of control. Seems the powers that be have reversed that (it's for sale again). This one E. rigida was once hard to find too, but I'm not sure if that was because of concerns about its invasive capabilities or just a lack of supply. Anyway...I'm sorry you can't grow it! (let me know if you want some seeds...shhh! I didn't say that...)

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  10. My myrsinites seeds of course, but thus far not my rigida. Similarly myrsinites appears in places far from the 'mother'. Also my E. Mellifera x stygiana seeded, I think, and hopefully I'll be able to grow it on. Such a fun family of plants.

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    1. Mine did too! (E. Mellifera x stygiana) The mama plant is dead but I've got 3 babies doing well.

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  11. It's a little strange to say I love finding seedlings like this now. There was a time I would have gone into a minor panic, thinking this was the first sign of an invasion.

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    1. They're hardly Bishops Weed or one of the other tenacious guys, easy to dispatch if you don't want them!

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