Thursday, September 24, 2015

The Hilderbrand Garden

Today I'm sharing the 3rd HPSO garden visit Andrew and I made on a hot Sunday back in July. Earlier we'd stopped at the Old Hurlburt School Gardens and then the Hansen-Winter Garden. Both the Hansen-Winter Garden and this garden contain a lot of garden art; statuary and rusted metal. They also are both obvious plant lovers. However the two gardens are very very different...

We parked near the scene above, there was also a barn and a pair of the cutest little ponies. I left Andrew there and followed the pathway into the tall trees...

There was something slightly surreal about a pristine cement pathway in a forest. I couldn't help but wonder what mysteries lie ahead.

Perhaps a basket of alien eggs?

I successfully fought the urge to take the silver spheres out and roll them across the lawn. I really really wanted too...

There were several orange umbrella's scattered around the 2-acre property. On an overcast day I would have thought perhaps they were placed for visitors to keep dry if a rain shower should break out. There wasn't a chance of that on this day. Maybe then as a shade providing device? Nah, the trees were taking care of that.

Then I read this article in the Fall 2014 Pacific Horticulture Magazine. Written by the gardener and homeowner it talks about her art extensive collection. She writes: "Almost every day I have yet another garden art epiphany. Big nylon banners would provide fantastic color and motion! I yearn for the soft evening glow of dozens of solar-powered Chinese lanterns. I would love to install Christo-like swaths of tulle between the 150-foot Douglas fir trees that shade our property. Then I remember the incessantly drifting fir needles that fall from the trees much the way hair falls from our corgi." Perhaps the colorful umbrellas are a nylon banner/glowing lantern compromise?

When I reached the gazebo I was still unable to see the house. Part of me wondered if there even was a house!

Onward...

Finally, the house!

To get to the back garden I felt like I was walking through the house, but actually I think it was just a covered walkway, at least I hope so - don't want to be trespassing. This grouping was at the back of the house...

And as you've no doubt noticed the harsh shadows made the photographic conditions horrid.

So many places so sit for a spell...

And yes, I loved the orange accents. Talking with Ms. Hilderbrand at a later HPSO event she mentioned that she'd been told orange was now "out"...we both agreed we couldn't care less.

Back out front I hoped to retrace my steps and find my way back to my waiting husband.

And I did. What a garden!

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

20 comments:

  1. Wow, I have to go through the photos at least one more time to take it all it. There's so much to love but I hate--no, HATE--the cinderblock gate and concrete path. To me, the materials don't got at all with the surroundings. The gate should have been of wood or natural stone.

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    1. But how do you really feel? Seriously though, would it help if I told you there wasn't just a single gate but many? And the details matched the first gazebo and (to some extent) the house as well?

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    2. I love the arch/gate, and had noticed the same materials seemed to be used in gazebo and house. But I'm strangely bothered by the silvery metal brace at the apex of the arch. It's surprisingly visually obtrusive and fights with the asymmetrical roof.

      Although there are too many hot red (orange?) objects in the "sit for a spell" image for me -- I'd leave it at the umbrella -- the effect with the blue hosta foliage and grey-blue chairs is gorgeous.

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    3. The all-wood gazebo with thatched roof: how do you feel about that one, Gerhard? To me it's one of the less pleasant vignettes -- a bit gloomy, and pastiche-y. But it may well be an excellent space to sit and see *from*.

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    4. "strangely bothered"...I love how you wrote that. Truth be told I hadn't even noticed it until you pointed it out. Maybe because I love shiny metal things?

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  2. What a magical garden! I adore the metal thingies (technical term) they used to support the tree limbs. They look a bit like saw blades but are much more whimsical.
    While I could agree about the cinderblock (I might grow vines up them), I like seeing a concrete path. It means I can easily take my daughter who is a wheelchair-user into amazing places like this. There are concrete stains that can help to make them blend into the surroundings a bit better. I would probably head that direction. I also like when plant material encroaches a bit over the edges. It really softens it up!

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    1. Yes, I loved those metal thingies too! Although I did have to stand there awhile really focused on them wondering if they were damaging the tree limbs.

      Great point about the concrete path being wheelchair accessible! When my garden was open last month I realized how inaccessible it is. The paver pathway has just enough space between each one to allow the wheels to sink into the lawn. Thankfully nobody had to experience this in person, I realized it from trying to get a hand-truck out to the patio,

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  3. Enjoyed your photos of this garden a lot! I do think the orange umbrellas are meant to be arty. I love the hanging basket of silver spheres. I don't know about orange being out in general, but it's definitely out there in my garden. Can't get enough.

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    1. Good one Alison ("out there in my garden")

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  4. In? Out? Once a color fad has ridden off into the sunset we can get down to personal preferences. How could you top those orange and red accents in the sea of greens? I get Gerhard's point about the concrete paths being a little harsh, but the paver paths perfectly echo the materials in the house and I'll bet concrete is a lot easier to maintain than gravel or some other more natural material. and...THE PLANTS! Zowie!

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    1. Indeed. As someone who gardens under (just) two towering fir trees I know what a mess they can make of everything below.

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  5. I love the garden. I want more trees!

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    1. Careful, your mean neighbor might hear you.

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  6. I realize it's now been a few months and many gardens since you visited, Loree, but do you remember where that rectangular pebble mosaic is situated?

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    1. Yes I do, it was in front of one of the entrances to the first, large gazebo. When editing my photos I was bummed to see that I hadn't captured a photo that showed it's location.

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  7. Cool gateway. Beautiful garden. I like a lot of it. I like the concrete; after it's rained for 3 months straight, a mulch path would be mud.

    One good thing about So Cal: orange is permanently "in".

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    1. Even 3 weeks straight and mud would be the rule of the land.

      As in Orange County?

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  8. Love the nest of alien eggs but totally understand the urge to roll them around the garden. We'd have a great game of bocce ball. Throw in some Chihuly spheres that we could smash up a bit and it would be a stellar day. Wait, would that be a game or performance art? The umbrellas are there to protect observers' eyes from the flying glass. Very interesting garden!

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    1. Smashing Chihuly....now you're talking!

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  9. Wow! Great use of foliage and carefully-selected art. Personally I can't imagine clearing out all the native vegetation under my Doug firs. It must have taken a lot of work. I'm too lazy, so I stick to the easier areas out in the open. But I would love to have a garden under mature trees like this. I love the foliage entirely covering the ground. Must cut down on weeding a lot! Ah, the red stems and blue fruit of Diphylleia cymosa, a favorite!

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