Tuesday, April 2, 2013

On second thought…

As it turned out my concern was unfounded, Andrew willingly agreed to the laborious chore of digging out the Sasa bamboo. All he asked was that I cut back the culms first, so he had easy access to the soil and roots. No problem! As I chopped I noticed all the new growth.

Twenty-five new shoots!

And those big leaves, they sure are pretty…

Then I got to looking at the patterns on the culms as I cut them down, and I remembered Mark and Gaz commenting about the striped effect this bamboo is known for…

And then I looked even closer…wow! Beautiful…

So my friends this is the story of how I had a change of heart and the bamboo will be given a second chance. I really had no intention of keeping it, as evidenced by my purchasing the replacement plant already! I figure by the time we're regularly occupying the patio those new shoots will have grown up and there will be leaves...

Now I have a nice 5-gallon Ceanothus ‘Dark Star’ that I need to find a place for...

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

31 comments:

  1. I'm glad you had a change of heart as that bamboo is striking. I like the striped effect on the newest culms of our Fargesia robusta, too. Now, what to do with 'Dark Star'...

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    1. I fear it's container bound for awhile at least...

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  2. Second chances is my middle name... or names.

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    1. Was this something you were gifted with at birth or came later as an adult?

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  3. Im glad you are keeping your bamboo too!!! its looks very wonderfully dramatic.

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    1. And don't we all need a little more drama in the garden?

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  4. can you dry them and use them for decorating?

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    1. Suppose I could, at the very least I saved a few to use for plant supports.

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  5. Or, you could sell the Ceanothus to someone who wants a good price but who doesn't want to make the 30 miles drive... Glad to see the Sasa bamboo ugliness is easily solved by cutting back - enjoy!

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    1. Did my husband ask you to make that suggestion?

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    2. No, ha ha -- but I am trying to find the right spot in my small yard for the right variety...

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  6. As I read this post, the song, "Let it Be" was playing in the background and reflected my sentiments about this plant. How fortunate that you kept it. The new culms will fill in nicely and it'll be gorgeous again. This just wants a haircut every couple of years. And if it still doesn't perform up to expectations, you've always got the Andrew Bohl, plant hit man option.

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    1. Andrew's got a reputation now I see.

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  7. We should never be too set in our ways. Good call!

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  8. And that's why it's called Sasa palmata 'Nebulosa'. :)

    So glad you're giving it another chance.

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    1. I thought you might approve Alan.

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  9. Oh cool Loree, you decided to save it :) by only keeping a few culms from now on all the more you'd appreciate its characteristics.

    I reckon it won't be too difficult to find a home for your Ceanothus either!

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    1. Where there is a will there is a way...and I have the will.

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  10. The striping reminds me of oriental lacquer. Beautiful.

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  11. It's a great pattern and will look so good in the summer. Nice to hear it's got another chance.

    Now if you can find just the right place for the new plant.

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    1. There's a pretty big project in our future for next spring...I think it (the ceanothus) will be in container hold until then,

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  12. Sometimes being patient pays off...I've done this a million times, especially with plants I thought were dead, but were just late emerging...and of course, I have already bought a replacement.

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    1. Patient...that's a word I have trouble with.

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  13. i only discovered this blog a few weeks ago and now i'm hooked. live/work/garden in upper east tennessee in the mountains. native hillbilly/certified plant geek . so many things you can grow that i can not but that doesn't stop me from trying!

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    1. Trying and having fun I'm sure! Glad you stopped by Jeff.

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  14. WOW is an understatement ... the pattern on the bamboo stems is gorgeous :-)

    If you plan to give some culms away, let me know ... and I'll talk hubby into coming to get it; Portland is only an hour away

    ~Val

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    1. I'll keep that in mind Val, and wow, you've got a nice husband!

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  15. what a great idea to keep the bamboo in check...might i ask where to get hold of some containers like those you have the bamboo in...here in portland?? thanks in advance

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    1. We bought ours at the Burns Feed Store out in Gresham, great prices!

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