Thursday, April 19, 2012

And now we observe a moment of silence…

Or maybe a 21-gun salute? Wait make that a standing ovation! Or no! How about a toast? (chink!) Yes that’s it! A toast to the very last of the 999,999,999 Bishops Weed roots dug from the ground…and a very exhausted and demoralized gardener who can’t wait to move on to more exciting things like actually planting all the plants she’s been accumulating. Which reminds me, there is a silver lining; new planting space!


Before…
After…
Of course the “before” pictures were taken last November when everything was looking especially ugly…
Now “Round II” of the fight begins: chemical warfare. I was going to take a picture of a bottle of Round-up aimed at a little leaf but I don’t need to encourage hate mail. Seriously though I spray guilt free, after the countless hours spent digging (I stopped counting at 40 and that wasn’t even ½ way through) now it’s up to the (carefully applied) chemicals to completely rid my garden of any Aegopodium podagraria 'Variegatum' that dares to reappear (and you know it will). Now on to “real” gardening….planting!

42 comments:

  1. Cin cin! Congrats on finishing a terrible project. And I wouldn't feel badly about that roundup either; sometimes it's the only thing that works.

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    1. Yes...boiling water and vinegar can only go so far!

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  2. A big CONGRATULATIONS to you and Danger Garden........It looks awesome!!!!

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  3. WooHoo! Well done! It looks so wonderfully empty now. I made the mistake of planting that horrible stuff in a previous garden, and had to do the same cleanup. It's such a pretty leaf when it's new, but mine also always looked brown and ugly by mid-summer. Looking forward to seeing this area eventually all planted up with wonderful spiky and exotic-looking plants.

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    1. You are so right Alison, in the spring it is a beautiful carpet of fresh green leaves...but then a little sun and heat and UGLY! The emptiness right now is making it easy to spot (and spray)n leaves but it's really hard for me to not start filling it up right now. Andrew likes to say "nature abhors a vacuum and so does Loree"...

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  4. I PLANTED bishop's weed last year and have been doing a happy dance to see it spreading. Different strokes for different gardens, eh?

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    1. And I would add to that "right plant, right place"...in a shady garden with boundaries, where it won't burn in the sun and won't spread to unwanted areas, it is a lovely plant. I just hope you never change you mind and have to remove it...

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  5. That is a crazy transformation!!! It looks really great and its going to be even better when you get to plant all your new treasures in there!

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    1. Louis I really had no idea how much space this project would open up! It is a welcome reward.

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  6. I hadn't realized it was on BOTH sides of your front walk! What a huge project, and what a lovely blank slate to enjoy planting now. I raise my glass to all your hard work!

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    1. Both sides and under! I dug back as far as I could under the sidewalk and was still pulling roots out. Oh and it's been growing up in the small crack between the front steps and the sidewalk too! I'm on my 4th or 5th application of Round-up there.

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  7. What a HUGE difference! When I need to pull out the big guns I do and am thankful I have them when they are needed. It's about some sort of gardening sanity when you come up against a thug. Obedient plant was one for me. Still see them from time to time. I do have a small container of them still. That tree by your front door, to the left with the little white blooms what is that. I think Ms. Doris Three Doors Down has that, could that be possible with us in the same zone?

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    1. I had to look up Obedient plant as I'm not familiar with that one, every picture showed masses of them!

      The plant next to the front door is Pieris japonica, I bet it could be the same!

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  8. Wow, the difference is stunning! It might have been hard work, but it was so worth it. A complete and total transformation. Thanks to you I know never to plant bishop's weed (not sure I've ever seen it down here).

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    1. You don't know how happy it makes me to think I could save someone the torture of trying to remove this thing...you, or a future gardener at your home.

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  9. Looks fabulous, and sometimes roundup does a world of good! Interesting to see you have the same name for the product on your side of the pond too!

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    1. I always try and go the organic route, but sometimes you just have to (as Darla said) pull out the big guns!

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  10. As one who has been through the BW eradication program , double congrats for both sides, I didn't have that much. Did find one tiny leaf the other day ,so I'll be on alert .

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    1. Haha...it sounds like a 12 step program when you say it like that "BW eradication program." Someone asked me if I am going to hold off on planting the area until I'm sure it's all gone. I responded that I doubt I'll ever be sure.

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  11. OMG...BIG Congrats! OMG...it really must feel amazing to have it done...even if you'll have to keep an eye out for stragglers. And yes...the best part is MORE ROOM FOR PLANTS!

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    1. Yes it does...a big ugly weight off my shoulders.

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  12. I know exactly how you feel and now you have a really good reason to buy more cactus and agaves. Looking forward to seeing the new planting.

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    1. Oh yes...I'll be sure to share photos!

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  13. Ah...a breath of fresh air...Have fun planting!

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  14. I am going to forward this post to friend who asked me, just last week, what I thought of using this evil weed as a ground cover.

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    1. If you don't think you've convinced her feel free to give me her email...I'll talk some sense into her!

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  15. Should that fail, I highly recommend making the bishop's weed-infested area a dog run. That won't kill it either, but it will ensure it's peed and pooped on in perpetuity, which somehow seems appropriate, don't you think?

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    1. Yes, I think "peed and pooped on in perpetuity" would be a perfect use for it!

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  16. Woot!!! What a work out! Way to wipe out an invasive pest. Looks great!

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    1. OMG...you are so right! My wrists and forearms really felt the repetitive movements.

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  17. Hey, I think I noticed a little leaf or two of this plant growing in a division I got (of another plant) from a neighbor gardener! Better remove it before planting this somewhere it seems.

    (I too don't object to limited use of chemicals -- sometimes there are just no other options)

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    1. Yes! And be sure to check for roots!

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  18. I know it's completely besides the point but the Phormium in the green pot looks fantastic.

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    1. A compliment is always appreciated!

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  19. You're an inspiration to us all!

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    1. Remember there is no time like the present to get started...

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  20. You should take another photo of the spot a month from now so we can all see how it grew back from the one teeny little bit of root you left behind.

    I spent the afternoon digging out Kikuyu grass that keeps coming back to life in my garden.

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    1. A month from now? No need to wait. I'm already spotting leaves...and tugging. If they come right out great, if not they get sprayed. I WILL win.

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