Tuesday, April 24, 2012

April Agave update…

Since we’re on the subject of Agaves (we were right? See yesterday’s post) I thought I’d update ya’ll on how my “in the ground” Agaves are doing, since we haven’t talked about them since February. Of course you know that means a bit of a weather report. Last weekend here was nothing short of amazing, sunny and warm…we actually hit 82 on Sunday! April as a whole has been rather nice, better than the last two years at least (2010 and 2011 we didn’t see 80 degrees until June). And much drier then March (2.55 inches of rain so far in April, compared to the 7.75 inches in March). I’m hoping we’ve turned a corner and from here on out things will only get better.

We'll start the show with the Agave Americana’s…(there are three of them), although they’ve lost a few leaves they still are looking pretty good

In fact a few of the pups even made it through the winter!


Moving on… Agave bracteosa lost a couple of leaf tips but all in all looking fabulous!

As is Agave parryi 'J.C. Raulston'…

The only out and out casualty in my garden was Agave americana 'Opal'…it’s gone to Agave heaven.
Agave Montana
Agave ovatifolia pair…
Another Agave ovatifolia…

Agave parryi var. parryi in the back garden keeps on keepin’ on. Sorry for the blurry picture but moments after I took this shot I dug this plant up and couldn’t go back and take another. Why was he dug up? Well let’s just say sometimes one project (replanting the Rhody area) leads to bigger projects, I’m pretty sure you know what I’m talking about.
Agave neomexicana, this little guy has done so well, even buried by an encroaching Sedum that I recently bought another. We’ll see…I’m kind of afraid I went a little overboard on my new Agave experimentation purchases…(you know this part is “to be continued”…)

In other exciting news the winter wrap on the Shade Pavilion…(the proportions of which look freakishly distorted in this photo)...
Came down last weekend!
This is a full month earlier than last year, thank god! I’ve been pulling plants out from under cover in preparation for this; in fact it was downright empty!

Now that the covers are off I’ll start bringing prisoners up from the basement and parking them here. It’s a good way to ease back into the outdoor life...sunlight is filtered as is the rainfall.
The plants stretch and breathe a big sigh of relief (and anticipation)…as does the gardener…

29 comments:

  1. I love updates like this one. They let me become part of the goings-on in somebody else's garden.

    Do you have an Agave havardiana? I think it would do great in your climate. And it's a beautiful species, I think.

    Your shade pavilion is a thing of beauty. I need something like that to protect my plants. Did you build it yourselves?

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    1. I only have the tiny Agave havardiana sent to me by David in Albuquerque...hopefully we'll have a sunny warm summer and it will grow!

      We did build the shade pavilion ourselves, well...the husband did. I painted! The patio is a very sunny spot and he wanted a place to be out of the sun, it works great for both us in the summer and the plants in the winter.

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  2. You agaves look great in the ground and have done well. Your selection pretty much matches my list of hardy agaves from my last post, which is not a surprise given that you seem to have a lot of wet weather.

    I am jealous that you are getting those warmer days, it is the main difference between in the UK, we take much longer to warm up properly.

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    1. After the last two Springs I was beginning to wonder about our weather! The joke here is that Summer doesn't start until July 5th, there are bits of warmth and sunshine up til then but that is when things really get good.

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  3. Wonderful report!!! I'm so glad to see your agaves did well. This inspires me! Maybe an agave report from up here is in order!!! I'm thinking of adding even more agaves myself. I'll see what the cactus and succulent table holds at the van dusen sale this Sunday!!!!! I def. am going to get an agave bracteosa!!! And don't worry, I don't think there is such a thing as agave overboard!

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    1. Bring on the Agave report! I'm sure some people would argue with your "no such thing" statement...but obviously I'm not one of them.

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  4. Sigh...forgive me if a note of envy can be detected.

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    1. Keep trying Ricki...success is just around the corner, especially with your new Joy Creek gravel formula!

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  5. Great post! I loved seeing how the agaves looked after the winter. I was hoping to see some larger over pics of the garden to better appreciate how you use them in the over effect. Love your shade building color.
    Dave
    www.firesafegarden.com

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    1. Thanks Dave...and I will be sure to include some larger pics soon!

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  6. I love that you showed the empty spot where the 'Opal' once was. No carcass, no hole, just a plantless pebble patch. :-)

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    1. Truth be told that one went away a few weeks ago. It was looking sad but a slight tug and I realized it was all over. Now the dilemma...replant another in that (cursed) spot? Or just leave it be...a memorial of sorts.

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  7. Great selection Loree, glad to see most of them have done well. The photo of the shade pavilion with its covers down has revealed lots of treasures there!

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    1. Really? I thought the sp selection was looking rather pathetic! I only brought up 2 plants from the basement today...must get serious about this or else I'll be at it until July!

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  8. Hooray for liberty!! Isn't it ironic with all the weird weather we've had this year that you were able to shed the cloth a month early?

    I'll try to get over on my lunch hour and get a photo of the aforementioned agave. I'll keep you posted.

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    1. Actually I don't think this year is a month early...more like last year was a month late!

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  9. Well done on getting so many Agave through the winter in the ground!

    I like your shade pavilion. It's cool!

    What is the bamboo in the big silver planter close to the right hand side of it? Looks like a Sasa of some sort.

    You are lucky to have had 82F so soon in the year. Many years the temperature struggles to reach mid-70s here. I must admit that I hate the Scottish climate, but thankfully the overall quality of life is high. If it wasn't I would move quicklu

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    1. It is a Sasa, Sasa palmata f. nebulosa to be exact. It is leaning out towards the West something awful. That's the next project I've got to rope the husband into...helping me pull/tie it back so it's a little more upright and not taking up so much of our patio real estate!

      Our frolic in the 80's was short lived. We're back in the cool grey 60's with sprinkles.

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  10. You are a wonder woman growing those agaves in Wa. You are making a better job of it than I. And to see them growing alongside hens and chicks is even more remarkable. I have tried those babies for years and they just don't like it here. As to your pavilion it is GORGEOUS. What a very neat idea. Love it, love it, love it. I wonder if someone can hear me?

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    1. My brother in Arizona has the same issue with hens and chicks. When he moved there from Spokane he dug up many from his garden thinking they'd love the desert...not the case!

      So it sounds like you'd like your very own shade pavilion? Give me your husbands email address and I'll start sending anonymous photos to him!

      (and just to keep there from being any confusion I'm not in Washington but rather Oregon...I was born, raised, and have spent most of my years in WA, but now living a little further south)

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  11. Your agaves look great, especially your J.C. Raulston. Mine is not doing so well. None of the leaves are mushy, but they all have quite a bit of yellow in them. I have no idea what's wrong or how to fix it. I know how one project leads to another. I'm currently playing musical chairs with a lot of my plants.

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    1. I'm sorry to read this about your JC...I bought a second one which hasn't yet gone in the ground. Hopefully as the weather dries and warms yours will go through an amazing transformation.

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  12. I really like your structure. Did you build the concrete retaining wall in front of it? Nice crisp lines.

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    1. Thanks! The retaining wall was actually the one project we hired someone to do. We started out planning to do it ourselves but as the costs for materials climbed and the questions mounted we realized it would be better to let a professional take care of the job. Of course had we been thinking we would have asked to include a step or two in the section of wall in front of the sp.

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  13. Glad the "hecho in Nuevo Mexico weather" arrived, too. Yes, this year is more on-time, as last year was a month (or two) late here! Warm, sunny positive vibrations, mon.

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    1. Back to the grey drizzle today...I knew it couldn't last forever.

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  14. I'm glad your agaves are free again, roaming wild in the Danger Garden once more.

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    1. Wow that paints a fabulous picture!

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  15. I just checked your list and find you do have A. parryi 'Cream Spike' but obviously not in the ground. Saw some stunning but pricy Cream Spikes over the weekend, and a couple franzosinii, which I NEVER see for sale. Lookin' good, Loree! That bracteosa seems really happy.

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