Monday, October 7, 2019

A new "fern dish"...

This photo was taken back in early September, when it was warmer, much warmer

For years these two dish planters were planted with Adiantum venustum (Himalayan maidenhair fern) and Athyrium niponicum (Japanese painted fern). However, at some point last summer I'd allowed them to get too dry and the one on the left died back completely, while the one on the right lost the painted fern and parts of the maidenhair fern.

I replanted the dead (and thus empty) one with a combination of Asplenium scolopendrium (hart's-tongue fern), Asplenium trichomanes (maidenhair spleenwort) and some Saxifraga 'Primuloides' from elsewhere in the garden. They've grown quite a bit in a short time.

Here's the bottom of one of the Asplenium scolopendrium fronds. From the Missouri Botanic Garden website I learned..."Sori are arranged on the frond undersides in rows that purportedly resemble the many legs of a centipede (skolopenda meaning centipede in Greek)." Who knew?

Once I took the various tillandisas out of these containers (into the house, due to cold) I was left with this. The one on the left looks fine, but...

The one on the right is not attractive.

I pulled the maidenhair fern out and chopped it into smaller pieces that I'll plant around the garden.

Then I replanted the dish (note: opportunity to buy new plants!) with these...

There's an Asplenium scolopendrium, an Adiantum x tracyi (a naturally occurring cross between Western Maidenhair (A. aleuticum) and the California Fan Maidenhair (A. jordanii)), and a Cyclamen hederifolium, along with more saxifraga.

When I pulled the cyclamen out of it's container I was surprised to find the stems circling around and around.

As a result, they flop over the edges of the planting dish. I'm hoping they'll eventually face upright.

Much improved!

Weather Diary, Oct 6: Hi 71, Low 43/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2019 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

13 comments:

  1. I really like what you've done with those two dish planters. I know I've mentioned before that Hart's Tongue is one of my favorite ferns. I hope they thrive for you. Great shot of the Hart's Tongue sori, and thanks for the info about the origin of the second part of the Latin name. I don't have great luck with Maidenhair, but I know it's one of your favorites. I think you may have to wait for new foliage next year on the Cyclamen before it straightens up. I've had that same problem with newly planted ones.

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    1. The hart's tongue fern I planted in the first redone dish has already performed better than any I've ever put in the ground, so there's hope! Oh and the cyclamen foliage is facing upwards now, so that's helpful.

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  2. They look great, Loree! I envy you your ferns. While there are a few that will survive our dry conditions here, they're generally not the ones I most covet. The few others I tried in my lath house didn't thrive but I think I erred in putting them in small pots so I'll have to have another go, provided I can make room. I really need to add an extension to the lath house...

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    1. Have you mentioned this lath house extension to the builder?

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  3. Love , love , love ferns ! :)

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  4. Wonderful re-do, Loree. Though I really loved the look of the maidenhair and tillandsia, outstanding!

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    1. Thanks Eliza. Yes, the garden always looks a little bare when the tillandsia have to come inside.

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  5. Love these fern tables. I have had great luck with A. venustum, less so with hart's tongue ferns. I have a couple that are doing quite well in a spot where I never see them. The more visible plant in better conditions is struggling more. Go figure. I am trying A. tracyi but it is not doing much. The cyclamen in gorgeous; such big dramatic leaves.

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    1. I've put a couple of hart's tongue ferns in the ground and they just sit there. Then something nibbles on their leaves and they look ugly. The one in the first dish has already grown, so I am hopeful I may have found a spot they can be happy.

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  6. The Maidenhair ferns and Tillandsia combo are gorgeous. Do you think this combo would work indoors? Would you allow me to use your first photo in an upcoming talk on plantscaping with house plants? I will of course give you credit and encourage everyone to tune it to your blog.

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    1. I have had success with maidenhair ferns indoors, but they require lots of moisture. And yes of course, feel free to use the photo and thank you for asking!

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