Friday, June 1, 2018

Oh how they grow...

For me one of the best parts of gardening is watching the plants grow and mature over time. But planting little tiny newbies is hard, when you want the garden you see in your mind's eye, NOW.

Earlier this spring, in April, I had reason to look back at my "not so big reveal" of the front garden from 2011, when I replanted with many of the plants that are there now. This was the overall shot looking north, pretty underwhelming, eh? I left that Euphorbia simply because it was the only thing with any size to it.

Roughly the same angle, photo taken May 25th. The Pieris japonica against the house were dug out in 2013 and replaced by a pair of Pineapple Guava (Acca sellowiana, detailed here). Of course you can't see them in this photo, since the Fatsia japonica (and my car) is hiding them. It (the Fatsia) was present in the 2011 photo, but disguised behind the Yucca.

Looking south, 2011.

And 2018. The Tetrapanax was in the 2011 photo, but only about a foot high. The Arctostaphylos densiflora ‘Harmony’ was too, it's a tiny blob to the left, lower, center (above) and now ruling the entire photo! Thankfully the Rhododendron in front of the living room window was replaced in 2013 (here) and the Bishop's Weed was eradicated in 2012 (here).

Let's look at some close-ups! The pair of Yucca rostrata with a pair of Agave americana, 2011

The Yucca rostrata are now trunking, and the Agave americana are gone. One of them turned to mush, the other was pulled (it looked so bad after winter 2016/17 and Sunset was coming for a photo shoot!) and lives on in a container. Agave ovatifolia and Agave protamericana 'Silver Surfer' have taken their place.

The Juniperus conferta 'Blue Pacific', freshly planted.

And now. The spread is said to be 4 to 6 ft. Word to the wise, that's not total, that's in every direction. In other words, 8 to 12 ft. Or more.

Arctostaphylos x ‘Austin Griffiths', 2011

Arctostaphylos x ‘Austin Griffiths', 2018

Arctostaphylos densiflora ‘Harmony’ with Podocarpus alpinus ‘Orangeade’ in 2011

And 2018

Standing on our sidewalk looking southeast into the street, 2011

Roughly the same view, 2018

Out of focus Cotinus ‘Royal Purple' buds in 2011

And foliage in 2018

Thanks for humoring me through another "then and now" post. I never cease to be amazed at the things plants do...

Weather Diary, May 31: Hi 65, Low 51/ Precip .03" (first measurable rain in 3 weeks)

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

40 comments:

  1. I've been reading your blog a long time, pretty much ever since the Seattle Fling, or maybe a little before. I remember a lot of these changes, painting the house, digging out the bishop's weed and getting rid of the Rhodie. And yet, somehow it feels like your garden has always been as lush and drool-worthy as it is right now.

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    1. Me too! I made all those changes but it's shocking to see the earlier photos. This is the garden I always thought I had!

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  2. I love these kinds of before and after - and yours shows such great progress. That Arctostaphylos bark is beautiful!

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    1. Hmm, you've given me an idea. I should take photos of that bark throughout the year, to share the changes it goes through.

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  3. It is difficult to imagine the ultimate size of any plant when you put it in the ground, much more so to show restraint by not planting 14 things in a 2 square foot area. You have done both with style, imagining what those Yucca rostrata and arctos will do and they are FABULOUS. Here's to patience. And, I agree with Alison, it has always looked fabulous.

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    1. Oh you're giving me way too much credit. If anything was sited well for its ultimate size that's nothing but pure luck.

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  4. It's impressive how a space can change so much in the hands of a master like you! The before and after posts are always so interesting. Like Alison, I remember reading about a lot of these changes but seeing the earlier pictures is always an eye operner.

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    1. And I remember your coming to visit for the first time and mentioning something about my front garden being sparse and my being a minimalist. Hahaha....

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  5. It is so amazing to see a plant's later form. So many look like perennials and really are shrubs or trees. Imagine if you had not taken these photos! Once the house is painted and plants are put in, the before visions fade quickly. It is so nice to look at those old images and see how far you and the plants have come.

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    1. It took us 6 years to get the house painted. What were we thinking? Oh that white was horrid. And I am so thankful that I have these photos (and many others) to refer to, my only regret is not having better photos of the garden style before this. I planted a much different palette of plants, before bad winters killed them off.

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  6. I just adore a garden before-and-after post! So we’re not humoring you with this (or any other of your) before-and-after post; we are highly entertained and appreciative! Not to mention some of us are even a little envious...

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  7. Just glorious! Like Alison & Peter I remember lots of these changes, and it's been a privilege to see it develop over the years via this blog -- thank you for sharing with us!

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    1. Thank you for reading, commenting and visiting!

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  8. WOW. At first I couldn't even make the "before" photos look like your house! The growth of your manzanita astounds me the most. They are NOT slow growing! Or at least these selections aren't!

    Great post to put all your hard work into perspective!

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    1. Seven years, I don't know, that seems about right. I wouldn't call them fast growers. Hard work, yep, there's been lots of that!

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  9. Before and after is one of my favorite genres. Inspiring in so many ways; for me at the moment, this post reinforces the idea of focusing on woody plants. Those manzanitas are breathtaking.

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    1. Yay! That was exactly my intention with this "design"...I wanted things to stay full and interesting even in the winter months.

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  10. I love before and after pix, the change is astounding!

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  11. It is mind boggling to me...how much your garden has grown. I am excited about the growth of Arctostaphylos x ‘Austin Griffiths'. I just planted one a touch bigger than when you planted originally. The growth is exciting! Great post!

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    1. Thanks Jenni, your ‘Austin Griffiths' isn't your first Arctostaphylos is it?

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  12. Your photos of the manzanitas make me want to go plant more in my own garden. Your post goes to show the value of lots of wide shots before, after planting, and then again as plants mature. When I'm down-heartened about my garden, nothing perks me up like looking at photos from 3 or 4 years ago. My only regret is that I don't have really good photos of the garden before I did anything.

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    1. Blogging certainly pays off with the photo-record doesn't it? I regret not having any photos (or many photos, there are a few here: http://www.thedangergarden.com/2009/04/our-front-yard-before-and-after.html) of the front garden design prior. Lots of Cannas, Phormium, Cordylines...

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  13. Love this post Loree- I'm a huge fan of the b4-after from any type of garden communicators. There's nothing better than results !

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    1. Results! Let's hear it for results.

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  14. I love seeing before and after photos. It is amazing how plants grow and how our tastes change over the years.

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    1. Indeed, the "taste changes" are maybe even more interesting than the plant growth.

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  15. My manzanita and Juniper got a serious hacking back last night ... I couldn't walk through the path anymore .

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    1. Well walking through the garden is important...

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  16. I join the enthusiastic chorus of fans of Before and After posts. Like Kris, I'm perplexed at the changes that take place in my own garden, despite the fact I had a hand in bringing on that change. The Arctostaphylos with the Juniper skirts bellow are beautiful. Adding bold color to the house also made a huge difference and it complements the garden.

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    1. The house color was largely chosen to back the garden, thank you!

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  17. Thanks for sharing the 2011 vs. now images, each and every one. That reminds me to do the same. A couple friends here also want to have a housewarming / pre-landscape event and a year or so later a post-landscape event, to contrast...

    And I think 2011 is when I found your blog, and your garden looked divine then. Now it's just fuller, better-crammed, and refined. Either is just fine.

    I must educate clients in my now-part-time design work in how plants mature, starting smaller and sparser, and all that. Your's might be a good illustration of that for now.

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    1. Education on how plants mature, that's a tall task! Your comment had me picturing plant labels with "now and in 5 years" photos. Wouldn't that be fun?

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  18. It's so fun to compare Thens with Nows. Your Arctostaphylos grew amazingly fast, 3x faster than mine. OTOH, looks like the Y. rostrata here has grown 3x faster than yours. Climate, climate?

    Oh my did that paint job improve your house. I'd forgotten.

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    1. Climate climate!

      Unfortunately it's about time for another paint job. I am not looking forward to the experience.

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  19. Love the before and after shots. Really like the color of your house and the green door. Saw your photos on manzanitas last year which inspired me to try some myself. A couple died but two are now into their second year!

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  20. It is a great idea to have before and after shots. It really makes you appreciate plants and time. Sometime its a good thing but sometimes things grow bigger than you plan and they have to be removed. I'm all for a good change now and again.

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  21. Love the story here! It is amazing how things change over time.

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