Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Garden Blogger's Bloomday — May 2018

The wonderful Carol Michael, mother of the Bloomday meme, blogger at May Dreams Gardens, attended the Austin Fling. Had I been a better blogger I would have captured a photo of her, with some gorgeous flowering shrub. Sadly I did not. Let's just say Carol is one of those people you remember and feel fortunate to have spent a few minutes with. Hopefully she'll attend next year's Fling in Denver, CO, and I'll be ready. Maybe with a big bouquet of fake flowers for her. She'd be game, I'm sure of it.

So on to the flowers, those that are blooming in my garden on this May 15th. Oh and how do you identify a tired blogger? They're the ones that don't bother to reorder their Bloomday photos from the alphabetical order the software uploaded them in. Oh well, hopefully you'll enjoy them anyway. Ajuga reptans 'Black Scallop'

Calycanthus floridus 'Athens', smells so good!

Ceanothus 'Dark Star' — I thought I took a close-up photo but I guess not.

Ceanothus thyrsiflorus 'Zanzibar'

Cerinthe major 'Purpurascens'

Disporum cantonese ‘Night Heron’

Embothrium coccineum

Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow'

Genista lydia, snuggled up to a volunteer Verbascum.

Grevillea 'Ivanhoe', not reliably hardy here but both of my plants lived through last winter, yay!

Grevillea juniperina ‘Molonglo’

Grevillea miqueliana, blooming for months and months now...

Grevillea rivularis

Grevillea x gaudichaudii

Grevillea x gaudichaudii again, because I have multiple plants, all blooming!

Indigofera amblyantha

Leptospermum lanigerum

Leucothoe fontanesiana 'Rainbow'

Lewisia cotyledon 'Sunset Series'

The same Lewisia, but shown with it's foliage rather than the grass it flopped into.

Lewisia NOID, sorry, but it's so bright the camera can't handle it.

Lonicera ciliosa

Lonicera x brownii 'Dropmore Scarlet'

Anigozanthos 'Bush Ranger'

Parahebe perfoliata

Podophyllum 'Red Panda'

Podophyllum peltatum flower

Podophyllum peltatum foliage (bonus photo)

Podophyllum pleianthum

Polygonatum odoratum

Rhododendron 'Ebony Pearl'

Sarracenia flower

Saxifraga urbium 'Aureopunctata'

Sedum palmeri, the flower belongs to the Aeonium looking foliage at the top half of the photo.

Symphytum × uplandicum 'Axminster Gold', a few buds showing up.

And we wrap with Thalictrum 'Evening Star'. May is so darn bloomy!

Weather Diary, May 14: Hi 89, Low 59/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2018 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

31 comments:

  1. The Lewisias are Lovely!

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    1. I agree! They are so florific!

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  2. I always forget to take photos of Podophyllum flowers, they hide so well under those big leaves. I tried and tried to get some Polygonatum pictures too, but they were hard for the camera to focus on. Yours are splendid!

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    1. I forgot to take photos of the huge yellow flowers bursting from my Trachycarpus fortunei, I think yours is more understandable!

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  3. I planted Podophyllum last year, but I never knew they had flowers. I am going to run outside right now and look - although it might be too early for flowers in my climate. I'll be watching though. Thanks!

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    1. In my garden the flowers emerge right along with the leaves, and open shortly there after. Hope you have some!

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  4. I stopped right at the top of your post to admire your Ajuga - such a pretty plant! Mine just laid down and died on me soon after I bought it.
    I see a lot of tubular blooms. The Hummingbirds must love your garden!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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    1. There are quite a few hummingbirds zipping around on any given day...

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  5. No wonder you are tired. You had a lot of blooms to list. Love the Podophyllums. Happy GBBD.

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  6. May is certainly grand in your garden. Grevillea x gaudichaudii is looking gorgeous. I killed mine by letting it dry out in the greenhouse instead of letting it tough it out through the winter. Oh well, live and learn.

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    1. Yikes! Truth be told I've done the same thing, only to different plants.

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  7. It's a bloomfest! Love them all -- particularly smitten with the thalictrum.

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    1. I think the blooms on the Thalictrum look like little fireworks, and they last forever!

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  8. Oh those Podophyllums! Does Red Panda keep its red leaves throughout the season? And I love the blue of the Thalictrum. All mine are much more lavender.

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    1. Yes, they stay colored up all season long.

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  9. You and Heather have me salivating over those Podophyllums I don't have a chance of growing. And you intensified my envy with the shot of the Disporum, which I actually tried in vain to grow in my former cooler, shadier garden.

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    1. Well as you know you're regularly giving me a serious case of climate (growing) envy, so...

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  10. So have in the hell do you fit all those Grevilleas in your garden?Does your winter 'prune' them for you ? And I really ought to try some Lewisias, I always admire them when I see them in Bloomday posts.Yet another plant to add to the list !

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    1. No pruning, maybe they just don't grow as big?

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  11. Oh the Sarracenia....love those. And I’m asking myself, why don’t I have any Grevilleas?! Thanks for the inspiring post!

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    1. Why don't you? In your climate you could grow some of the super fabulous ones!

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  12. I have coveted Thalictrum 'Evening Star' since you posted about it last year, maybe it was in your fern table post.

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    1. I bet that's when. It's the only one I've kept alive.

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  13. Ha! Tired blogger? I didn't even rename my photos from the numbers the camera assigns them. But I did reorder them a bit as I shot over two days, so I guess we just used our energy in different ways. I am so very fond of ceanothus, and oh, how drool-worthy is that Grevillea rivularis! I was hoping for blooms on at least one of my two Embothrium this year. They started developing the short spur branches and looked like they were going deciduous last winter, but ultimately kept most of their leaves. The new leaves coming out now are shorter, more like those of a mature tree, so maybe next year...

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    1. I was thinking you got a Grevillea rivularis from Ian, no? My Embothrium looses its leaves every winter. I've stopped worrying about it though.

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  14. I think you have as many Grevilleas as I do, just different ones. The Lewisias are lovely--wish I could grow them!

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    1. Yours have the big luxurious flowers though! (wait, no, I shouldn't complain)

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  15. Those Grevilleas... I need more. They should grow here, right? And I will admit thinking about how your camera labeled your pictures with botanical plants names for a while... Sigh!

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    1. OMG...now that would be amazing! (camera labeling with botanical names) Grvilleas, I would think they all should do great in your climate. If you're ever in the Ventura area visit here: http://www.australianplants.com/

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  16. What an unusual collection of lovely flowers havent heard of them ,but they are so beautiful

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