Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The Weyerhaeuser Campus, at the Rhododendron Species Foundation Botanic Garden

When I lived in Seattle I didn't know anything about the Rhododendron Species Botanic Garden, but I did know this building. You catch a glimpse of it from Washington State Route 18, which I took on occasion.

As far as I was concerned it was magical. Low, somewhat blending and "of the land'...plus it was covered in green. I never actually bothered to venture any closer than the quick glimpse, always on my way somewhere.

I did know it was the corporate campus of Weyerhaeuser, which is "one of the world's largest private owners of timberlands. It owns more than 13 million acres of timberlands, primarily in the U.S., and manages another 14 million acres under long-term licenses in Canada. The company also manufactures wood and cellulose fiber products." (source)

Truth be told it was the sale of the campus that had me finally visiting the garden last November (fear of it's possible closure) and thus finally seeing this building up close.

The fog off in the distance hangs over St Rt 18, that was my vantage point, back then.

Now I was finally exploring up-close and personal. It was wonderful, and a little eerie. After all the place was deserted.

That's my car facing us, there was someone sitting in the car backed into place, and off in the distance are a few cars belonging to people at the garden. Otherwise, empty.

A rill!

The main entrance...

The building was empty too. With just a few left-over boxes strewn about. I wonder if they'll find a new tenant? Or if this wonderful structure will be demolished?

This is the view from the other side, from an access road off of Interstate-5.

Close enough to the Interstate to see and hear the traffic, yet it felt far far away.

Beautiful.

And now I finally know it's even more magical up close.

Weather Diary, March 13: Hi 53, Low 47/ Precip .66"

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

24 comments:

  1. It's a beautiful campus and amazing building. Inside the spacious halls and huge windows make you feel like part of the outdoors. Technically, the building is a dam & was a cutting edge building when it was built. The property has been sold to the L.A. based Industrial Realty Group. There is fear that the building will be torn down and the property "developed" and movement to save them both has begun. Such a beautiful campus, even when abandoned.

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    1. You've been inside? I am jealous. Makes sense that it's a damn.

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    2. Your mouth! It's a damn dam, my friend. :)

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    3. Ha! I crack myself up.

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  2. Unbelievable! So green and gorgeous. What an amazing site. Turn it into condos. What happened to the company?

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    1. The company moved, I believe to downtown Seattle. Condos would be fabulous!

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  3. Barbara H.March 14, 2017

    Wow, what an amazing spot. I'm glad you finally made it and really glad you took us along. I would love to see the inside.

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    1. I peeked in a couple of windows, what I could see was pretty boring, but I figure there has to be some good stuff!

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  4. It seems it may be architecturally distinct, worthy of saving. And yes, I think it'd be fantastic housing!

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    1. I hope those with the keys and the $ feel the same!

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  5. WOW, I'd love to see this. I love deserted buildings, especially on this scale. I hope it won't be torn down.

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    1. Me too! Wish you and your camera could get close.

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  6. I hope greed doesn't overcome vision and lead IRG to chop up the property willy-nilly without an overall plan. You don't see corporate campuses like that in the LA area. The last corporate campus I worked in was/is pitiful by comparison.

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    1. It's pretty unusual for any corporate campus I would guess, LA or anywhere.

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  7. john in cranstonMarch 14, 2017

    Wow, stunning. I had no idea (I'm East Coast...
    But still, thanks for the tour!

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  8. Gorgeous photos. Thanks for the tour. I've always loved that building and wanted to explore it more, but whenever I go there I head straight for the rhody garden.

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    Replies
    1. Knowing it might be my only chance I carved out the time.

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  9. What a seriously fantastic building and what a shame if it is lost to development --Somebody call Bill Gates and ask him to write a check.

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  10. Beautifully done. Would be a shame if it were demolished.

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    Replies
    1. Indeed, but worse things have happened...

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  11. Cool building, but nothing compared to that monolithic stone in the courtyard!

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    1. It's pretty cool huh!? I wonder what the story is there?

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