Thursday, March 23, 2017

Visiting Nowlens Bridge Perennials

Friends and I made the trek to Nowlens Bridge Perennials late last August, it's about time I share my photos...

Nowlens Bridge is located in Molalla, Oregon. About 40 miles south of Portland, it was a beautiful drive.

When visiting a new (to you) nursery, off the beaten path, there's always a fear the trip will be a wasted one. Thankfully this was not.

Quercus dentata 'Pinnatifida'

Mahonia gracilipes

Spigelia marilandica

Sciadopitys verticillata (Japanese Umbrella Pine)

I love this plant!

As you can see the plants were healthy and the selection was great. Edgeworthia...

The tag on this one said Farfugium japonica 'Kaimon Drake', with a picture of a creamy leaf with green splotches. I thought it must not be right until I looked it up and read this from Plant Delights Nursery: "This unusual Japanese selection of leopard plant could easily have been named "snow leopard." Farfugium 'Kaimon Dake' emerges with large white leaves, each highlighted with a random pattern of central dark green specks...sort of like a cheap flat screen television after the warranty expires. The aging foliage eventually turns solid green which gives the clump a surprising amount of vigor. This cultivar does not like deep shade, actually preferring an hour or two of sun daily."

That beauty wasn't for sale, but I found a smaller one that I purchased (along with a pair of Dierama 'Merlin' that I'm pretty sure died over the winter...so sad).

Physocarpus opulifolius something or other. I love the way the new foliage glows...

Silene regia

Close-up...

You probably won't be surprised to hear I became incredibly obsessed with this collection of things.

I really wanted these.

And that! I want that in my garden!

Acer pseudoplatanus 'Esk Sunset', I think.

Don't you just love a whole hoop-house to explore?

Schefflera delavayi

x Gordlinia grandiflora "An intergeneric cross between Franklinia and Gordonia. Early white 2 in. flowers, semi-evergreen foliage, and a robust tree-like growth habit"

I wonder if this would make a good hellstrip tree?

Just asking "for a friend"...

Eomecon chionantha (Snow Poppy)

On the right, Cedrus deodora 'Cream Puff'? Totally a guess, but I love the two textures together.

Oh to have a sea of happy Podophyllum like this.

Back outside I noticed this Nicotiana loving the heat in an off-limits section.

There was one more shady area to explore, but I neglected to take photos there.

Other than to imagine what a nightmare this must be.

Agreed.

Oh! And speaking of buying plants, Nowlins Bridge Perennials will be selling their plants at the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon's plant sale, Hortlandia, on April 15 and 16! Details here.

Weather Diary, March 22: Hi 55, Low 42/ Precip .10

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

21 comments:

  1. My dream job would be writing nusery reviews. Nicely done!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh! Can you imagine getting paid to visit nurseries!? (well, evidently you can) That would be wonderful.

      Delete
  2. Love those umbrella pines but I, of course, first noticed the pot of Geranium phaeum next to them since it's one of my faves. I think those are the dread branches/needles from one of my now deceased evergreens. Every spring I used to put on heavy gloves and run my hands up and down the branches knocking off the dead stuff. Don't miss that job or the plant.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The tall Douglas Fir trees growing behind us reward me every year for my fighting the developer not to cut them down. The "reward" is in the form of male cones, falling and falling and falling. I've often wondered if I should stop using gravel much and start using the cones instead. (all that is to say I understand the sentiment)

      Delete
  3. Looks like a great nursery well worth the drive. Okay, the sign alone was worth the drive but they had a lot of really cool plants!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They did...can't wait to see what they bring to Hortlandia.

      Delete
  4. Another great nursery with an impressive variety of plants but I must ask: what exactly would you do with that giant grain silo thingy?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be a place to grow vines!

      Delete
  5. I love exploring nurseries, can't think of a better thing to do except exploring botanical gardens. ;)
    That rusty disc looks like a train wheel. Bet you could find lots of such things by visiting a train yard and asking to look at their junk pile. Better bring a burly friend, just in case. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds dangerous! And yes, gardens and nurseries...the makings of a perfect vacation! (who needs beaches?)

      Delete
    2. It's what I like to do on vacations, beaches are boring in comparison. ;)

      Delete
  6. Great selection, indeed. Those Mahonia gracilipes are drool-worthy. I hope mine burst into growth this year...and the rabbits stay away from them...

    ReplyDelete
  7. I could totally see you making a cool planter out of those rusty round things. Or maybe the whole stack of them, looking like an Elizabethan collar around the neck of an Agave.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Some very interesting plants--the Franklinia hybrid is quite stunning--but seeing Oregon looking rather dry is a bit of a shock after all the PNW puddle photos of this winter. So your state does dry out every few years?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're joking right? Every summer. Tinder dry in the summer, soggy in the winter. Although this year I am starting to wonder if we'll ever dry out.

      Delete
  9. Lovely landscape photo from the drive: it exudes warm weather.
    I'm also a fan of Umbrella pine, unfortunately I can't accommodate it's eventual size. The sign is so good, I laughed out loud. A perfect way to start my Friday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ya, that thing does get big. As for the warmth, I could almost feel it.

      Delete
  10. Nice nursery and love that sign. I have a very tiny twig-of-a-thing xGordlinia that I'm watching carefully to see if it comes back this year. It went all deciduous and I hope it's still alive.
    Sea of happy Podophyllum? Yes, please.
    I was never impressed with Spigelia marilandica until I bought one because it was touted as a great hummingbird plant. Much more impressive in person, and so far I'm very happy with it.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to comment. Comment moderation is on (because you know: spam), I will approve and post your comment as soon as possible!