Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Visiting Mon Paradis, the garden of Lisa Fuller

When my member "open gardens book" from the HPSO arrives in the spring I sit down and go through with a highlighter, marking my "must see" gardens. I had to wait awhile for this one, as it wasn't open until late August...but boy was it worth the wait!

I've chatted with garden's owner/designer, Lisa Fuller, enough that I knew she has great plant taste. Plus the lady is always wearing amazing jewelry...you have to figure that's going to transfer to a great garden design too, right? Quite literally in fact...

My only regret in visiting this garden was that it happened in the evening, thus the light in these photos is a little off, even after editing to correct it. However on the positive there were none of the harsh shadows a daytime visit would have meant. And the "feel" of the space was magical...

I need to find out where Lisa acquires the metal pieces she uses throughout the garden. She must be a blast to shop with...so many treasures.

And check out the figs!

I'm not normally a fan of Echinacea but these glowed.

Off the back of the house was a huge deck and next to it a small kitchen garden, packed full of goodness.

Pay no heed to that foggy spot in the middle of the image — this vignette was just too good to not include because of a bad photo.

Such a lovely Loquat...

Other visitors enjoying the potager.

And this! I thought the bottles helping to make a raised planting circle were a bit of genius.

Separated at birth? Lisa and I both have a thing for succulents, hardiness be damned! I meant to ask where she overwinters hers...and I hate that I'm starting to think about beginning the migration of my garden (but there's no denying it is that time of year).

There really were splendid vignettes everywhere you looked!

This is a large garden, as you've probably figured out.

Here's the description from the open gardens book: "This woodland cul-de-sac property sits on an east-facing sloping lot that ends at a seasonal creek. I've spent six seasons so far reclaiming the woodland from blackberry and ivy, terracing the slopes into open sunny fruit, vegetable, herb, and dry gardens. Distinctive shrubs and trees including my favorites: katsura, cornus, acer, magnolia, hydrangea, and viburnum occupy the middle story, and irises, planted for succession blooming from February through July, meander along a natural spring. A tiny bog garden, a fern stumpery, and a "campground" also keep things interesting along with many seasonal and evergreen charmers including hellebore, hosta, paris, trillium, epimedium, and an ever growing pot garden of succulents."

There were candles placed throughout.

And all of this is happening under these tall tall trees.

I really appreciated the fact you could see how much fun Lisa has in her garden...

From a fancy "meal" for two...

To a campground!

With details...

...everywhere you look!

Mail for the birds?

There's a pond under there.

Onoclea sensibilis (Sensitive fern)

Now I've left the back-40 and I'm exploring the garden around the other sides of the house.

I was not alone.

Once again I must say how bummed I am that the photo-quality does not match the garden-quality. Hopefully I'll visit again on a bright cloudy day and can take more photos.

Thank you so much Lisa, for sharing your inspiring garden!

All material © 2009-2016 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

23 comments:

  1. Love her collection of succulents too, and her terra cotta pots. But the face planter with the Tillandsia xerographica on the tree, the big shell, and the "meal for two" really spoke to me. I think you underestimated the quality of your photos to get across the wonderful experience of wandering this garden. What a great place.

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  2. A delightful and fun garden to be sure! So many great ideas here. Love the succulent meal and the face with tillandsias. What's that you say about migration? Bite your tongue! Although, I have put more shelving in the greenhouse to accommodate more cacti and succulents. How do they keep growing in size and number?

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    1. Such a great garden...

      Oh and it's Agave math. They should teach that in school.

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  3. I was impressed as soon as I saw that espaliered fig tree. That's one of the best looking edible gardens I've seen. I appreciated the smaller touches too, especially the face hanging from the tree with the Tillandsia hat and Spanish moss hair.

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    1. The fact that in a garden of such size there are so many small details to take in...well it's just wonderful.

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  4. I think it (your photos) looks great! All the little touches are so impressive--the shell with semps, the candles, the potted plants ... wonderful! Yes, the migrations is just around the corner. :(

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    1. I am starting to hear the geese flying over. The succulents aren't the only thing starting to migrate.

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  5. I love the face with the Spanish moss and Tillandsia xerographica. This looks like an amazing garden to explore! I love the informal style.

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    1. Too bad you're not closer to Portland Evan, I think you'd really enjoy the HPSO open gardens.

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  6. I've been longing to visit this garden. Until the Godesses smile, this will do very nicely. Thank you!

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  7. Very cool gargen with so many amusing touches. Nice container plants, too.

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  8. This garden had me drooling! It's one that I would love to see in person as her style and taste in plant combos is superb. Not only great succulents but great pots to put them in. I look forward to your next visit. I don't think the pix were particularly bad, esp. when you compare them to photos taken at noon on a sunny day which really is a problem.

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    1. Yes harsh shadows and bright sun can be worse, I'm glad you were able to see what I was trying to share with these photos.

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  9. Super duper cool. So glad you documented--and so sorry I missed it.

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    1. Maybe you can catch it next year!?

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  10. A feast for the eyes. So much going on and a person who has more pots than I do! I agree with the echinacea. Gorgeous in the evening light. That wall and that espaliered fig. I may have to have another go at that. And that plant seashell. Was it just a coincidence that I also planted one of those today. I foraged in the garden but I may have to match that planting.

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    1. Ah Jenny someday I hope to see your garden! Maybe on the Austin Fling?

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  11. Wonderful garden, and I love the light! Your photos make everything look very dreamy, and even more magical than it all might seem in the cold hard light of day.

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  12. I was at Lisa's Open Garden, and it was still wonderful to enjoy it again
    through your photos. I saw details that I missed that evening. Thanks!
    Jepi Martin

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