Thursday, October 10, 2013

Meanwhile back at home…


While I missed the glorious Portland weather last weekend (74 and sunny), at least the weather gods have given me a little dry time to get out and see what’s what in the garden since arriving home. So far “fall color” in my garden is a no-show, except for the golden leaves on the Poncirus trifoliata…

I don’t think I’ve ever caught the Mahonia x media 'Charity' at this stage of bloom. I like it.

Speaking of bloom, the Musella lasiocarpa (Chinese Yellow Banana) looks like it could go on and on for months, unfolding layers of yellow petals. I’ve noticed more than one hummingbird taking a rest here; unfortunately I’ve not been fast enough with the camera to capture them.

The blooming schefflera, S. delavayi…

And S. brevipedunculata are coming along nicely.

But isn’t it a little late for hosta flowers?

And why are seedlings of last year’s Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’ coming up now? Shoouldn’t they have appeared in the spring?

There are only 4 of them here so far, I’m kind of hoping for more. Do you think they’ll make through the winter?

More seedlings! Euphorbia rigida is still a little difficult to find here in the nurseries (at least when I’m looking for it) so I intentionally left last spring’s flowers in place longer than I should have…my plan worked, seedlings!

Here’s the largest…

My “new” Hymenanthera alpina is covered with little white berries.

Love this plant.

Oh and the Magnolia laevifolia seeds are ripening!

Pennisetum purpureum 'Vertigo' continues its quest to become the size of a bus, not that I’m complaining.

Last Tuesday was the beginning of the month long ‘Tough Love’ parking lot sale at Cistus Nursery and I managed to make a quick stop there before leaving town. I bought a Cytisus battandieri (Pineapple Broom), in need of a little TLC, and this…

An olive! No tag, I have no idea what it will grow up to be, but heck it was only $6 and that’s half the fun.

And finally a small sign of spring, the flowers are forming on both of my Edgeworthia, this one is E. chrysantha 'Nanjing Gold'…

It’s not too early to think about spring is it?

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

28 comments:

  1. I'm amazed by how long Musella lasiocarpa blooms. Is it hardy in Portland or do you have to bring it inside in the winter?

    Your garden is full of wonderful plants...

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    1. It's hardy in Portland 9 out of 10 winters. I lost my last one (actually a clump - post blooming) in that #10 winter. It's in a container now, so in an emergency situation it can be protected.

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  2. That Hymenanthera is interesting - the berries are great. I looked it up on-line and the first item that came up was a post you published in 2011. Anyway, your garden appears pleased with your recent rains. I hope your seedlings settle in.

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    1. Thanks for sharing that fact Kris, I never know if my Google searches are what the rest of the world sees too. This is an under appreciated plant!

      The rains were crazy intense. I'm hearing our winter forecast is rain intense, the averages PLUS an extra month. Damn. I wish I could share...

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  3. Beautiful! And HOORAY on your olive!!!! that's really exciting. And the pineapple broom is pretty darn cool as well! sounds like you scored some good deals!

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    1. I did, two cool (large) plants for $6 ea...not bad eh?

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  4. I've been toying with the idea of coming down for the Cistus Tough Love sale, but so many of the plants there are unfamiliar to me even when healthy, that I'm not sure I have the gardening chops to bring something that isn't doing well back to full-blown life. I hope your olive thrives. I have Cerinthe popping up too. I don't have high hopes that they'll survive the winter.

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    1. I'm glad to hear my garden isn't the only one with Cerinthe seedlings. Fingers crossed they make it.

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  5. Your garden is looking great as always! Cerinthe seedlings often appear late,tough it through the winter, and put on a lot of growth in the spring. You got some great deals at the tough love sale and glad that you now have a pineapple broom. My edgeworthia, after being happily in place for many years, bloomed, leafed out and then died this year. Maybe it read my mind when I thought that the orange one was pretty but I didn't have space for it. Something to look for at the nurseries next spring!

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    1. Yay! Thanks for the Cerinthe info.

      I see an orange Edgeworthia in your future. It's amazing how fast mine has grown.

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  6. I'm noticing a bunch of seedlings from the cardinal climber...same questions you raise about Cerinthe (which I'm pretty will show up in great numbers, one way or another, come spring).

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    1. Interesting about your cardinal climber. This is my second time growing it and I've never seen seedlings.

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  7. Cerinthe can be in full bloom at Christmas given a bit of mild weather.

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    1. You know I'm always hoping for a mild winter. Cerinthe blooms would definitely be a bonus.

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  8. Love the first photo -- I always got the impression from other photos that there's lots of space around each plant. Glad to see that's not true of all of your beds. :)

    So when you say 'Vertigo' is big -- how big? Mine is 6' tall or slightly above!

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    1. Me with lots of space around each plant? Oh my...so not not not true! Things are crammed in with no space at all. I love that somebody out there has this idea of me though!

      Wow, 6ft tall? No mines not that big. Probably because it didn't get much water in the heat of the summer when there was no rain. It's wide though, that's why the bus comment. I'd say 5 ft across, which seems like a lot since it was about 6" when I planted it.

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  9. Never too early to think of spring Loree :) seeing the pic of the Mahonia Charity at that stage of bloom made me go wow! And I wish I left the Euphorbia rigida seeds in situ, could do with more of this great plant.

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    1. I've pulled about 20 of them (Euphorbia rigida) in a bad spot but left the rest. What's not to love? They're easy to move and easy to pull. Free plants are a good thing!

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  10. My Cerinthe are just coming up now as well. They start blooming in late winter and finish up just before the summer heat commences. Hummers love them.

    Some great plants there, the Vertigo and Hymenathera especially. So jealous of all your rain last week. We got 0.15" yesterday. It was quite a thrill (no, not being sarcastic!).

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    1. This makes sense for your climate Hoov, but here in Portland? And oh how I wish we could share the rain...really I do!

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  11. Wow, so many fascinating plants! I don't know where to start with my comments, because so many of your plants are totally different than what I have in my garden--and I'm fascinated with them all! I'm going to have to stop by your blog more often. I'm rearranging my blog feed lately, and I will add you to the list. I especially LOVED the first shot showing all the foliage and cacti together!

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    1. Cactus and agaves are plentiful where they don't belong in my garden I'm afraid.

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  12. I'd bet the Cerinthe seedlings overwinter just fine...I'm amazed at how tough little seedlings are...especially the ones that self-sow.

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  13. I have Cerinthe coming up all year , editing it is key..I must know the identity of the silver leaved plant to the left of the largest E. rigida , I must know. How have I never noticed this before ? I mean, look at it !

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    1. Indeed, how have you not? Ha! Eryngium maritimum:
      http://dangergarden.blogspot.com/2013/07/eryngium-maritimum-my-favorite-plant-in.html

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  14. I'm lusting for a M. 'Charity' - ever since we went to Kingston... I think your yellow fall color is scrumptious. And I treasure the little Euphorbia seedling you gave me at the swap. So excited!

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    1. You definitely need a M. 'Charity!'

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