Thursday, October 3, 2013

Finally a green wall I can keep an eye on…

A couple weeks back I opted for the quick and easy Thai take-out answer to the “what’s for dinner” question. After tossing the food in the car and heading for home I spotted this…

I imagine most people are probably over the concept of planting a green wall, but I’m still a little curious, mainly about how they weather the long haul. Since there aren’t any examples anywhere near me this was a welcome discovery.

It looks recently planted; things have yet to completely fill in.

Although the plantings are certainly lush as-is…

And it’s even lit for nighttime viewing! I’ll be keeping an eye on this one…

If you’re local and curious the installation is on the corner of NE Alberta and NE 26th, in Portland. The lone identifying sign was this…

Which points to this website, it’s not the most user friendly site but it is what it is.

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

23 comments:

  1. It's a nice wall but I'm curious how it will fare in time. Keep us updated if you get the chance to pass by it again in the following months to come.

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  2. I've been curious about this kind of thing too, wondering how it does after a while. Hope you post again about it in six months or so.

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    1. Yep - 6 months seems about right.

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  3. Interesting find! Looks like they used a series of wooly pockets. Wonder how it's irrigated & if the company comes back to tend it. Looking forward to your updates!

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    1. Or at least a woolly pocket like material. As someone said below since their name is on it I suspect they'll take pretty good care of it.

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  4. I don't think this is a project for the homeowner. Our WHole Foods has one indoors and very successful. I have no idea what goes on behind the scenes at night. I can't even keep one wooly pocket going for long.

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    1. Oh yes I bet Whole Foods has the "behind the scenes" crew to keep something like that looking especially good.

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  5. I did visit the website via your link. Interesting that they compare cost per square foot for this vs paintings. I think we both know fellas who would bristle at that.
    Since this installation is basically an ad for their business they will probably be vigilant in maintaining it (avoiding the question of how it might work for ordinary humans). Anyway: while I'm basically over these, this one is quite pretty. Keep us posted, won't you?

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    1. I didn't catch that comparison but yes, there are a few people who would take issue with that statement! Not being a fan of murals though if I had to chose which to go on the side of my business this would win hands down.

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  6. Most of the vertical walls I saw when they 1st became the in thing were composed of succulents but lately I've seen more like this with a mix of herbaceous plants. One at the nearby nursery appears to get changed out with the seasons, which perhaps indicates something about durability. It'll be interesting to see what you discover (and it provides an excuse for regular take-out).

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    1. Changed out with the seasons? Well I guess if the budget allows it...

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  7. I like the look of this one with all the textures it will be fun to watch. As long as they deal with the stringy goo you showed on the one at Goodwill in Seattle it should be nice. The pockets look easier than the grid and frame method which I tried once and they are probably better suited to your climate than mine as Jenny pointed out.

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  8. This vertical garden looks nice. I wish it was easier to maintain them.

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    1. Have you tried your hand at one Lisa?

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    2. Not really but I went to a course about them and the irrigation and fertilization is a bit tricky, especially when big

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  9. I can't imagine trying to keep something like this hydrated here, it's akin to the sphagnum moss basket that has to be watered daily. They must have some drippers installed right ? It's very attractive and appealing. You'll have to give us some photos in December Loree--at least it will probably get plenty of water by then !

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    1. In the first photo you can see some of the excess water run off on the sidewalk, and you're right, wet won't be a problem in the winter. But then again it is on the east side of the building and judging from the way the rain hits that side of our house it is pretty protected

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  10. I am echoing all the above posts! Do keep us posted on how this wall fares. Interesting choices of plants and I am curious about irrigation during the dry months.

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    1. When I visited it was very hot (93 I think that day) and they seemed to have the irrigation running strong. We'll see!

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  11. The plant choices seem quite interesting, I noticed after breaking off some rootless pieces of Heuchera last summer and sticking them in pots, that they all grew and developed roots, and I just planted them outside, so they are much easier to propagate than I expected.

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    1. Interesting, I had no idea they were so easy.

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  12. I looove green walls! This guy is sooo not over them. I too wonder about the long term longevity and am very curious. I do have a wooly pocket needing to be planted up and am planning to make my own thigmotropes for an indoor tillandsia wall.

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