Monday, January 21, 2019

Guzman’s Garden Centers in Las Cruces, New Mexico

During the family reunion festivities in Las Cruces last June I was able to make a quick break for it and check out a local nursery, Guzman's.

Pulling into the parking lot I was surprised to see these large 'Dynamite' Crape Myrtles...

It's one of the short-list trees Andrew and I had been discussing as a replacement for our hacked up street trees, that is if the city follows up on the unauthorized butcher job and we get to replace them (long, ugly, story).

These were gorgeous and only $299 (that seems like a good price?)

Agave murphyi

This place was full of charm.

I've got no idea what this is, but I took three photos of it.

Russelia equisetiformis

WOW!

Dinner plate sized...

There was only one other car in the parking lot, I pretty much had the place to myself.

These plants were off in a corner by themselves, perhaps already sold to a lucky customer?

Veggies!

One last look at the Lagerstroemia and it was time to get back to the hotel.

But wait! En-route to the hotel (reunion location) I discovered a second location for Guzman's, of course I had to stop.

Love that feathery water plant, I've never seen it for sale here, but Renee (Gardening Turned up to Eleven) has some and named it for me: Myriophyllum aquaticum.

So many plants looking for someone to take them home!

Love the pond...

And the Ocotillo! (usually bare-root plants aren't, well, planted)

A few indoor selections...

And now it really was time to head back to the hotel (I was late!)...

Weather Diary, Jan 20: Hi 45, Low 41/ Precip .42"

All material © 2009-2019 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

22 comments:

  1. Is the mystery plant maybe some form of Centella (Pennywort?) Sorry to hear that the city butchered your street trees. Crape Myrtles would be a lovely replacement if you get to replant.

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    1. Yep, certainly looks like it could be Centella, I wonder why I was so captivated by it?

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    2. It is Umbilicus Rupestris (crassulaceae) an uncommon plant here in Italy

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    3. Ah! Thank you, yes. Now it makes sense!

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  2. Have to say that urban butchering of trees seems to be a given, whether it is the city or the utility company doing the bad job. Depressing.

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    1. Ours weren't even supposed to be touched. Stupid subcontractor gone rogue.

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  3. Those enormous dinner-plate hardy Hibiscus are so gorgeous. Do you grow any? They're easy to start from seed, but they do like lots of water.

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    1. I don't. I've been tempted by them, but not fallen (yet)...

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  4. I don't know why, but I was surprised to see the pond. I hope the water doesn't get too hot in the New Mexico summer; maybe there is a cooling system to help the koi survive.
    A row of Crape Myrtle along the parking strip would be stunning.

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    1. I wonder if there aren't pretty big rock overhangs around the pond, creating shady areas?

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  5. Ooo...fantastic nursery. Seems like a clean, well-organized nursery, kudos to them. I'd shop there in a heartbeat. I think $299 is an ok price for the crape myrtles, they look fairly large in your photo. Thanks for the sunshine and agaves!

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  6. I fell for that brilliant red crape myrtle on Hoover Boo's blog. Even more over the moon for Black Diamond 'Red Hot' and Ebony Embers because they also sport really dark foliage.
    rickii

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    1. Now the trick is to find them locally...

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  7. I love nothing more than discovering local gems like this one. We're definitely on the same wavelength there!

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    1. Even if it sucks when you can't bring the plants home...

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  8. Nice local garden centers-charm. NM seems like a very difficult place to garden. Water restrictions, 110F in summer, 0F in winter.

    Crape Myrtles need summer heat. Adjacency to heat reflectors like the street and concrete walkway would be your best place for success. You would get the beautiful fall color that I don't get here--they color up splendidly when it gets cold enough. Mine cost $60 for 20 gallon size.

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    1. The happiest Crape Myrtles I see around here (and there are a lot) seem to be street trees, and that price seems like a steal!

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  9. I'm so surprised that you stopped to nursery shop (2x) on the way to an appointment (NOT!). I've always wanted a crape myrtle. A line of them as street trees sounds like heaven.

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    1. I'd just have two, but maybe it could start a trend on the street. Oh wait, no. Cause the city won't let people make their own street tree choices.

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  10. Those Crepe Myrtles are gorgeous! Now you have me curious about the long, ugly story...my imagination is going wild. Lucky you to have the place almost to yourself.

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    1. It involved a subcontractor who went wild and hacked on trees they weren't supposed to touch. I was livid, but also dealing with a very sick dog in the last days of her life, she took priority and I wasn't able to fight with them as it was happening.

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