Wednesday, November 15, 2017

November 2017 Bloomday Blooms

This November's Bloomday is one of the least florific I remember here in my garden. Of course memories can deceive so I did a quick look back at November 2016 and 2015 and yep, it's true. Several of the previous November bloomers perished in last winter's cold. Others just don't seem up to the task of blooming late in the season this year. Thank goodness for the ones that are...

Abutilon Nuabtang was one that perished, darn it, I loved its orange flowers. Abutilon Nuabyell kept on going though, and I added a second plant this year. Yes, those are leaves from the Magnolia macrophylla on the ground, I still haven't managed to pick them all up.

I've almost cut these final Anigozanthos flowers several times, to enjoy them indoors. However since we've not had a frost yet — more importantly there's not one in the forecast — they've stayed. It's nice to see the vibrant color in the garden (more Magnolia leaves!).

Flowers are starting to open on the Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica). Of course the open ones weren't in spot I could get a good photo of, so you get buds.

The mislabeled pink Nicotiana (it was supposed to be brown) is still blooming. Word is this one's going to seed around too. Looks like I'll be pawning off baby plants next spring.

Persicaria microcephala 'Red Dragon'

NOID Rosemary

Maonia eurybracteata 'Soft Caress'

Mahonia x media 'Charity'

A wider view...

And a close-up...

Fatsia japonica 'Variegata' (Camouflage).

And just plain old Fatsia japonica.

I don't remember any of my other Eupatorium capillifolium 'Elegant Feather' blooming.

It's kind of fun to see.

Hakonechloa (aka Japanese Forest Grass)

Not flowers but oh so ornamental, Poncirus trifoliata fruit (this after more than a dozen have already dropped).

It wouldn't be a November Bloomday if I didn't share my ever-hopeful Tetrapanax buds. I just know some year it's gonna get to bloom. Some year, but probably not this one (it's way behind where it was last year at this time).


And the plant I'm most missing this November is my Grevillea victoriae 'Murray Valley Queen' which up and died last July. Thankfully the Grevillea miqueliana is positively covered in fat buds so hopefully there will be winter blooms for the hummingbirds, and me, to enjoy.

Just as exciting is seeing both the yellow, and orange, blooming Edgeworthias budding up. Looking at these plants gives me hope that indeed next February will come, and there will be flowers.

As always click on over to May Dreams Gardens for links to all the bloggers sharing their blooms today.

Weather Diary, Nov 14: Hi 58, Low 45/ Precip .02"

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

28 comments:

  1. With climate change going the way it is, you may be right about your Tetrapanax some day blooming. There's very little blooming in my garden this month too.

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    1. My memory says we made it almost to Christmas one year without a freeze. It could happen!

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  2. I have childhood memories of Loquat covered in sweet orange fruit.
    Eupatorium capillifolium 'Elegant Feather' is so unusual. I read up on it. In some places it said to be sterile, in others that is sets seeds and spread... Since it never bloomed before, you probably don't have seeding issues.

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    1. I've been told it pops up all over the place on the east coast. Probably not this exact cultivar, but similar enough to make some nervous.

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    1. The hummingbirds share your opinion.

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  4. Oh dang, it's Bloom Day... I had all but forgotten! I need to go outside pronto, and photograph what little there is... Not entirely a tempting idea, since the bloomers are mostly the usual suspects (which I get so tired of photographing) and it's pouring down rain. I suppose that's what I get for procrastinating! That Charity is incredible (mine is still in a pot, but at least I think I've figured out a spot for it), and I do wish I had room for a Loquat. I love the big Magnolia leaves strewn about - they are like big, yellow violins with silvery undersides. I appreciate that!

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    1. Yesterday was WET...and grey, and cold. I love your violin analogy.

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  5. Poncirus trifoliata fruit is very handsome on the the leafless branches! Too bad they fall off so soon. I've never seen an Eupatorium capillifolium 'Elegant Feather' in bloom before & it is very interesting. Hapy GBBD!

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    1. I'm enjoying the fruit inside the house as it falls, so it's not all bad.

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  6. Not too bad; not bad at all! You are much more floriferous than I am, which isn't too surprising, I guess, after numerous freezes here. The Rosemary is lovely. And your Mahonia is probably the most attractive I've ever seen! That is one of the plants I knew little about until I started blogging seven years ago. Yours is wonderful! Do you prune it regularly? The shape is exquisite.

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    1. I've never pruned that Mahonia, it's done it all on it's own. I may have to start though, depending on who moves into the house next to us and what their parking practices are. It's starting to encroach on their driveway...

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  7. I love the yellow abutilon and the Loquat! Loquats are wonderful trees, I have one and bees love its flowers.

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    1. They are fabulous trees, love the big, glossy and evergreen foliage.

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  8. My 'Charity' doesn't even look like a plant in the same genus as yours. In fact, I've been considering pulling it given that it dropped so many leaves during the long, hot summer but, after seeing yours, I'm going to try to be patient - maybe it's just going through its gangly teenage period.

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    1. That's it I'm sure! Or maybe a garden with so many lovey Grevillea's just isn't meant to have a lovely Mahonia too? Oh! Sorry. That's pure jealousy speaking there. I hope your plant snaps out of it and puts on some nice growth this winter.

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  9. 'Charity' looks fabulous against your paint color!

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  10. Very different types of plants i see there, i guess i haven't seen any one of them. I love that mahonia characteristics the most.

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    1. I love seeing what's blooming in other parts of the world each month, thanks for stopping by!

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  11. I don't think I've ever seen Hakonechloa in flower before!

    Agree with others about the way the paint background sets off the Mahonia. It's even more dramatic with that Eupatorium; what a beaut. How tall is that one?

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    1. I love everything about Hakonechloa, such a great plant.

      The Euatorium is about 7 ft tall...but it's in a container, so that helps.

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  12. Any way you look at it, I'm in love with Mahonia Charity.

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  13. Love the Mahonia...What a beauty.

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  14. The yellow Abutilon flowers are really fetching.

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  15. You have some great blooms! I have a few of the flowers in my garden here in New Zealand, but some of them are very new to me.

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