Tuesday, August 8, 2017

Cracked Pots at McMenamins Edgefield, 2017

Last Tuesday (August 1), as the temperature crept up toward the century mark, it was time for the annual Cracked Pots Art Show at McMenamins Edgefield. While I am no fan of "Art" in the garden I do support the idea behind Cracked Pots: "Crackedpots is a volunteer driven non-profit devoted to waste reduction in our community. Creative reuse - reclaiming and reimagining - is at the heart of all we do." The ReClaim It! store I wrote about last week (here) is the retail marketplace for the Cracked Pots organization.

So while I ventured out to the show (after giving my garden a good soaking and taking a quick shower) it was really just about walking around the Edgefield gardens and soaking up all the activity. I had no intention of taking photos of the art vendors, although I did hope to get a few plant shots. This Aeonium was the first thing that had me reaching for my camera.

How bizarre is this?

While similar in form, this is the more expected coloration.

This is just all sorts of freaky fun.

Can any of you from more "Aeonium friendly" parts of the country identify it?

Moving on...this dead, but yet resprouting, Arctostaphylos caught my eye.

Edgefield is further east, out along the Columbia River Gorge. All the cold wind, ice and snow that I experienced in my garden last winter was only worse out there. I knew their gardens were hit hard, but it's nice to see things are bouncing back.

What a gorgeous stand of Bamboo, showing up nicely against the pale green wall.

Back in 2010 when I visited Edgefield for a plant sale I was enthralled with these huge trough-like planters.

And a very similar (perhaps the same?) Agave...

Moving on, Grevillea victoriae, breaking my heart! (more on that soon...)

Onoclea sensibilis

I need more of these.

In front of the hotel...

I remember Andrew standing in front of this Gunnera, on a past visit, and being dwarfed, all 6-ft 2-inches of him. It's not quite that tall this year.

This is one of the first Magnolia macrophylla I ever remember seeing. It was quite awkward back then, but seems to have grown out of that stage.

So, upon first walking into the show, and gardens, I spied the work of Indio Metal Arts. There were a few pieces I really liked, being more container than "Art" — and the price was within my realm of doable. I played the time-worn game of "if it's still there when I go back"...and it was!

So this little piece came home with me.

I love that it's made from salvaged scrap material and can't wait to plant it up.

And because Portland has such a tight community of artists and gardeners I realize I've seen her work before, on last year's ANLD Tour (photos here). I'm thrilled to now own a small piece.

Weather Diary, Aug 7: Hi 89, Low 62/ Precip 0 (day 51)

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

12 comments:

  1. Cracked pots sounds amazing. One of these years I'll make it down for the event, perhaps when it's not quite so hot. Your find is fabulous and I can't wait to see how you plant it!

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    1. You and your partner in crime (Alison) should come down next year! It's totally your style.

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  2. I swear some year I'm going to get to this show! It's just up my alley. I love the great piece you bought, looking forward to seeing what you do with it. I think I saw a picture of that same Aeonium on someone's Instagram feed, it looked like a cinnamon bun.

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    1. Yep, you and Peter would both love it. Field trip next year!

      It was probably Ann's Instagram. She posted a photo of a plant at Cistus. No ID on it either....

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  3. I love your purchase; perfect for your garden. My notes on that fern describe it as aggressive. I would not go that far but mine has spread left and right from the original plant, even though it is in a dry spot. Also has seeded into a more hospitable location nearby. However, it has taken a number of years to do so.

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    1. I've heard aggressive, but the two I bought a few years back have hardly spread at all, I think it's because it's so dry here (day 52 w/o rain...so all it gets is what I give it...).

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  4. I love your purchase as well. WHat's the size? I can't really tell from the photo (and call it "little").

    Your mystery aeonium looks like a very stressed 'Mardi Gras'.

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    1. Ah, thanks for the possible ID! The rusty metal is about 9" x 9"...

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  5. That welded scrap metal container looks like it was made just for you! The closest I can come on the Aeonium is A. leucoblepharum, which has similar coloration but the leaves of mine are pointed rather than rounded like the one in your photo.

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    1. Ah, A. leucoblepharum is a cutie, but you're right, the leaves are definitely shaped a little differently.

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  6. I like those Aeonium, though to my eye, all Aeonium look bizarre.

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  7. I like your new acquisition. What will you plant in it, I wonder? Can't wait to see!

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