Tuesday, August 15, 2017

August 2017 GB Bloomday

Here in Portland we had a brief period last weekend where moisture actually fell from the sky. This moisture, some may call it rain, is expected to fall here any day between November 1st and say mid June. However outside of that date range it is extremely rare. So very rare that I had to get out and take my Bloomday photos on Sunday, just so I'd be photographing under that cloudy sky and with raindrops on the blooms...

The garden smelled amazing, and I'm not talking about that petrichor scent of the rain so much as the scent of the foliage and flowers.

But enough about the weather. How about some plant names! My Bougainvillea × buttiana 'Barbara Karst' is still blooming its heart out, because that's what Bougainvillea do.

I planted a couple of Gaura lindheimeri early in July, they're still going strong.

As are the Indigofera amblyantha.

The Santolina chamaecyparissus 'Lemon Queen' no longer qualify as flowers, but I'm keeping them because they remind me of mini Chrysanthemums.

Ceanothus thyrsiflorus 'Zanzibar'  has put on a second round of flowers. Much lighter (in color and quantity) than what I originally got in May.

Just for the record I'm grateful, not complaining.

A NOID Sempervivum.

Hesperaloe parviflora

The Zinnias!

I shared many photos of my Zinnia as cut flowers on yesterday's blog post, but after cutting that they're already re-blooming.

I'm growing Zinnia elegans 'Envy', 'Queen Lime Blush' and 'Queen Red Lime'.

All luscious!

Crocosmia 'can't find the tag'

A impulse purchase at the "everything" supermarket.

Also from the everything market came these Canna lilies. They were labeled as 'Cleopatra' but that's not the case. Not even close. Luckily I knew what I was getting when I bought them and was not disappointed.

Pelargonium sidoides

Nicotiana (not) 'Hot Chocolate' (they were bought 'Hot Chocolate', which would have been a lovely brown color)

Grevillea 'Ivanhoe'

Hibiscus syriacus 'Red Heart', being oh so very florific!

Albizia julibrissin ‘Summer Chocolate’

Abutilon Nuabyell, back to blooming after being cut to the ground last winter.

Ditto for the Bomarea sp. (those are Rhododendron sinogrande leaves).

Alstroemeria isabellana

Anigozanthos, aka kangaroo paw.

Sarracenia sp.

Another kangaroo paw, this one Anigozanthos flavidus.

The Moon Cactus has produced! Blooms for days. Unfortunately for Bloomday they closed up. Check out my Instagram feed for flower photos.

Billbergia, possibly B. vittata (thanks to a friend's ID on Instagram).

Another Bromeliad (probably Vriesea ospinae var. gruberi) that's sending up a bloom. I was told this one was rather unimpressive. We'll see.

Kniphofia, one of the 'popsicle' series.

Paris polyphylla - Heronswood form, still going strong.

Metapanax delavayi, in a tangle with Clematis tibetana var. vernayi, which I never got around to cutting back...

And this, blooming just in time! The stinky carrion flower of a Stapelia.

By afternoon it had already started to fold back its petals to further expose the pollen in the center —  in hopes of attracting flies. And even though it's facing the wall (silly flower), it was successful. I took a peek the next day and could already see eggs. There will be maggots, aren't you jealous?

For more flower fun, without maggots, click on over to our hostess for Bloomday, Carol at May Dreams Gardens.

Weather Diary, Aug 14: Hi 75, Low 52/ Precip 0

All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

33 comments:

  1. You gave me a piece of that Stapelia, I think? It rooted well, and I hope to some day have a big stinky, maggot-ridden flower as well. I love your Hibiscus. There was a big hardy Hibiscus here in the garden when we moved in, but I gave it away on craigslist because I didn't like the flowers (they were doubles) and it flowered so late. I need to rethink that late flowering thing, and find one with flowers I like.

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    1. Yep, you are now the owner of a piece of the stink. Hopefully.

      My Hibiscus starts flowering in July and just keeps on going. I love it. Don't get that light purple/lavender one I see blooming around town. The flowers are so small and they seem to close up almost instantly and then stay on the plant for far too long looking ugly.

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  2. You have some amazing blooms there Loree. Weren't you once a "don't want flowers" type of gardener? Maybe I'm misremembering...

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    1. Yep, misremembering. Never a "don't want flowers" gardener. More of a I don't garden FOR flowers gardener. No swaths of flowering perennials. Not my style. But plants do flower, and thus since I have plants, I have flowers.

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  3. I love that shot of the hibiscus and Japanese forest grass -- so zen! And what a success with the zinnia cutting garden, all those great lime-tinged varieties. Amidst all the cool blooms of bomarea and the alstro, I spy lots of fun stuff, the strobilanthes, protea -- August looks splendid!

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    1. I'm definitely not one of those "I hate August" type gardeners. The opposite in fact.

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  4. Love that alstroemeria! Happy Bloom Day!

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  5. So exciting that Bomarea sp. came back; didn't think it would be hardy here. The size of your Stapelia flower is impressive even if the fragrance and pollinators it attracts are less so. Lots of cool and unusual flowers in your garden as always! Happy GBBD!

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    1. I was thrilled to see the Bomarea return, especially after last winter's craziness.

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  6. You could have started and finished with a single flower: the Stapelia bloom. I've seen a few in my time, but nothing as astonishing as this color and size. And hair! I'm more then a little envious.

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  7. How do you keep that Geranium going in the winter? I killed mine. That Alstroemeria is gorgeous and unlike any I am familiar with. And thanks, but you may keep the maggots. If you are familiar with the Napoleonic Wars, you may know that maggots were used to help heal wounds. Don't try it at home without reading up on it!

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    1. The Geranium was given to me (from Bonney Lassie, Alison) this spring, so it hasn't had to face a winter yet. I was told it's lived for a few people in my area so I'm giving it a go!

      Oh and there will be no maggot experiments around here. No.

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  8. My Stapelia flowered while I was away ..what an interesting plant !

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  9. The alstromeria and billbergia sent me back for a second look. Are you letting those maggots stay? As soon as I see them then I snip that flower off.

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    1. I'm watching them with interest. Once things get really going they'll be outta here. If they fall to the ground (which I assume they will) all that's there is cement. Perhaps some creature will find them tasty?

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  10. Wow, so many flowers! I had to scroll through twice to really see them all. Do you what Stapelia it is?

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    1. Unfortunately no, it was bought without a label.

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  11. Zinnias! I am on my way to yesterday's post!

    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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  12. my word that Stapelia flower is a big 'un ! And I love Anigozanthos flavidus..I would buy that in a second if I found one.

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    1. I bought two, only one seems really happy.

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  13. Great flowers, and now I know what petrichor means. Blogs: they're cool.

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  14. Gorgeous gorgeous and a lot going on, still. I bought the same Nicotiana, supposed to be 'Hot Chocolate' but it's PINK. Oh well. Maybe that's commonplace with Nicotianas.

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    1. Sorry it happened to you too...

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  15. What an interesting collection of flowers you have! The bougainvillea looks right at home - I hope you find a way to keep it happy over winter. The flower color of the Billbergia surprised me, as did the size of the Stapelia's flower. I loved the Sarracenia too - it looks as if it's about to speak. I'm glad your weather has improved and that you got a rain surprise! We had drizzle this morning ourselves - it yielded just 0.01/inch on my rain meter but, hey, every little bit counts.

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    1. Mainly the rain was welcome for getting rig of the horrid smoke. Thankfully it was just a blip and we're back to the sun...

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  16. Makes me happy to see all your lovely unusual plants and flowers!

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    1. And I'm happy that you're happy!

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  17. Whoa - that Stapelia blossom is HUGE! I had no idea flies lay their eggs in there - congratulations on your... um... maggots. I always have a hard time picking a favorite in your garden, but that Hibiscus always fills me with plant envy - it is so darn beautiful.

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