Saturday, February 15, 2014

Bloomday, February 2014

Last week anything in my garden silly enough to have been blooming, or thinking about it, was covered in snow and/or ice. This week? It's like it never happened! Arctostaphylos x ‘Austin Griffiths'...

This Helleborus x ballardiae Pink Frost is sporting a little soil, just to prove it was smashed flat into the ground.

This hellebore fared the best. Too bad I can't find the tag to tell you what it is!

Helleborus foetidus, always a trooper.

Helleborus lividus 'White Marble' was tucked under cover.

The same for Helleborus 'Silver Dollar'

Loropetalum chinense var. rubrum

Acacia baileyana 'Purpurea'

Grevillea australis

Hamamelis x intermedia 'Early Bright'

Edgeworthia chrysantha ‘Akebono’ just starting to open it's orange flowers!

And finally my husband Andrew's entry in the bloomday post, his office Rhipsalis salicornioides (Drunkard's Dream) is blooming, with a single orange flower!

The entire Garden Bloggers Bloomday roster can be found at May Dreams Gardens, check it out!

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

34 comments:

  1. Oh, your acacia! Those blooms are the most perfect shade of yellow--they're like egg yolks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Eggcellent description of the color! They're actually on the decline now, after blooming for a couple of months. The color just keeps getting darker.

      Delete
  2. Every year around this time I remember that I need to get an Edgeworthia, but then spring comes and I forget again. When I finally get one, I'm going to have to see if I can find that Akebono. Love the orange flowers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Remember Out In The Garden Nursery I asked you to look for at the NWFG Show? I think they're where I got the Akebono, but here at the Portland show. It was just a stick but with leaves and a bloom.

      Delete
  3. Happy GBBD! You've got quite a lot of blooms given your recent bout with snow and ice. I wish I could get my hellebores to bloom - I haven't given up on them but they clearly like my old garden better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry Kris, that's frustrating!

      Delete
  4. The traditional southern garden azaleas could be replaced with Loropetalum -- blooms from February to hot weather, instead of a couple of weeks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not being a fan of azaleas I certainly like the idea!

      Delete
  5. Very pretty!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

    ReplyDelete
  6. Not bad at all, considering you guys just had heavy snowfall. Looks like all of the white stuff has melted already which is good!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It did, although I saw a fairly large pile just yesterday in a parking lot. Surprising with all the rain we've gotten.

      Delete
  7. I'm glad we don't have to pick favorites here. They're all so great! I think that orange flower on the drunkard's dream is an old flower. I had one in the conservatory I took care of in college and the flowers would start off yellow and age to orange.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ya we thought the same thing, but it was a fun color contrast to catch!

      Delete
  8. Oh, I miss my Edgeworthia 'Akebono'. You just reminded me to get another! And, yes..a little jealous about that Acacia~!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds like there's a sad story there.

      Delete
  9. I was wondering how your garden fared in the cold but it seems to have pulled through. Once again you have incredibly interesting blooms to share with us. Now tell me, was that a real ladybug on the pot?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, it was Jenny! Nothing like a little "pop" of red.

      Delete
  10. Wonderful as always, Danger! I'm dying to know, what does your Grevillea australis smell like? Does the powerful fragrance waft? You've got lots of great winter flowering plants!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As soon as I manage to smell it I will let you know. Sadly I haven't been able to detect a scent!

      Delete
    2. W.H.S. (Witch Hazel Syndrome or What Heavy Scent?) strikes again.

      Delete
  11. Well Loree, in spite of your snow and ice, you have way more going on in your garden than I do.I believe the tide will turn in March though !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I look forward to your March report then.

      Delete
  12. So nice to see some real blooms on this snowy February day. The ice doesn't seem to have affected these blooms at all. You've given me a serious case of Hellebore envy:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's pretty amazing how resilient plants can be.

      Delete
  13. Well you still managed a bit of a show with your weather.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I like all the flowers so much...but that lady bug in one of the pictures made me smile.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, it was so nice of her to happen by just as I was snapping photos!

      Delete
  15. Alison asked my question and you answered it. Now there's going to be a run on those at YGPS. I'd better go early.

    ReplyDelete
  16. "Like it never happened." That sure made me smile. We were covered in snow for weeks. So weird for us. Now, the wind is blowing a gale, and we have earthquakes. Sometimes, I wonder if Mother Nature isn't throwing a fit. I love your hellebores. Can't wait to see mine soon. Thanks for your kind words about my book.

    ReplyDelete
  17. It seriously amazes me how fast your garden can bounce back from such weather. People talk about how tough plants have to be to survive in our climate but I after reading your blog for a while I think they have to be even tougher to thrive in yours.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for taking the time to comment. Comment moderation is on (because you know: spam), I will approve and post your comment as soon as possible!