Monday, July 22, 2013

Hey check out that parking lot!

Have you ever recieved an email from a friend saying you should check out a parking lot because it has cool plants? I recently did and I’m glad I listened…after all you don’t see oleander in Portland everyday!

Or sidewalks planted with olives and rosemary...

Very interesting!

Big spiky Yucca rostrata...

A fig? (I recognize the leaves as being something I should know)...

Pineappple guava (Feijoa sellowiana) next to another Y. rostrata.

And even blooming magnolia!

Turns out these cool plants all came from Cistus Nursery, of course!

Those who work in the building obviously approve since they've set up places to relax, not normal behavior in a parking lot!

There's an informainal sign too, in-case folks parking there are curious. Too bad it doesn't include a plant list (is that taking it too far?).

Against the far wall (baking in the sun and reflected heat of the asphalt) more oleander!

As well as a huge grevillea and a pair of eucalyptus.

On the far side of the lot another eucalyptus....

And what I think is a Catalina Ironwood (Lyonothamnus floribundus var. asplenifolius)

Cool leaves

Cool bark, what's not to love?

And since I was just a block away I figured it was time to pay my annual summer visit to Pomarius nursery...

Check out the cool old umbrella stand!

So many beautiful plants.

And new construction right next door.

If my memory is correct this tall bloom was connected to a Manfreda x virginica 'Spot.'

I've seen Arctostaphylos (manzanita) trained as a standard but never with a corkscrew trunk...

Pretty darn bizarre!

Blue skies...we've been spoiled.

I felt like I was being watched, then I looked up to see the horse.

A fountain for your estate garden?

Or maybe some minimalistic rock furniture?

I almost bought this 6-pack of purple cabbages because they were so gorgeous...but then I realized I have no place for them and they'll need more water than I will be able provide with my busy July schedule, maybe next year. It was fun to dream...

All material © 2009-2013 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited.

28 comments:

  1. That's a parking lot worth checking out. The plant choices are are amazing. Nice to see the tenants enjoy the thought put into also. We have a few parking lots with excellent plant choices but none quite like that.

    Fun nursery tour too.



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    1. There were quite a few people coming and going while I was snapping photos. Usually this results in strange looks and them attempting to locate just what it is that has my attention. Here there was none of that, everyone seemed to "get" the plants themselves were photo-worthy.

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  2. Of course Cistus designed it . . . it's gorgeous!

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    1. And smart too, there's a little back-story on their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/CistusNursery

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  3. I love those stone chairs (but I won't ask what they cost). The corkscrew manzanita was interesting - I wonder what they'll look like at maturity?

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    1. You know I didn't see a price on the stone chairs, although I didn't look very hard knowing I couldn't afford them. As for the manzanita I doubt they'd handle a heavy wet snow load very well...they're rare but we do get them.

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  4. I never did make it to Pomarius when Nigel and I came down for the weekend a couple of months ago. Thanks for the quickie tour. And that parking lot is great. It's good to see a company put some thought and work into making it a nice experience just to park and walk through on the way into the building.

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    1. There is always next time for a stop at Pomarius, and now you'll know to walk down the street and check out the plants!

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  5. Ha...I was in that neighborhood yesterday and took note of the Oleander. I think all the surrounding cement makes it possible to grow it (I tried, and failed, several times). I didn't explore further, but now I will. Thanks for the tip.

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    1. Ya it's definitely a little heat zone there, glad they're taking advantage!

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  6. That's it! The next time Elliot tries to race past there as I say into the wind, "we should go to Pom....", I'm going to INSIST he slam on the breaks. Thanks for the gorgeous reminder of why sometimes you have to be a tough mother.

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    1. Indeed you do, I think a threat to take away the keys should help, no?

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  7. The fig looks like the Afghan Figs from Cistus. 'Silver Lyre', I think.

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    1. Funny I was just introduced to 'Silver Lyre' when Andrew Key's was here and he got one at Cistus. Beautiful plant.

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    2. I mailordered one this spring but it shriveled up one very hot and windy day when I was not here to give it some TLC. Sean came and gave a presentation earlier this year when he wondered aloud about whether it could prove hardy here in ground. Will test that out next year, I guess.

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  8. And in my haste, I thot this was 2 separate article. Of course it had to be Cistus.

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    1. It probably should have been...

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  9. I think Susan is right with her fig I.D. Xera also grew some of these this year. The interesting tree leaves oar of Lyanothamnus floribundus. I think of Sean whenever I see one as he calls it "Truly one of California's most handsome natives." It was no surprise that he had a hand in creating the great parking lot garden! Yea for a fun visit to Pomarius!

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    1. I'm seriously considering one of those (or both?) for the area north of the patio when the privet comes out...

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  10. harsh rostrata lust! That is soo wonderful. I especially love those parking lot lounges - That's the way to do it! I bet its hot hot hot with all that pavement. Those rostratas (and summer loving folks like myself) must love that!! But for reals, why have I not made it down to P-town!?

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    1. Indeed why have you not? Perhaps in August?

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  11. Car park planting is not something anyone sings praises for but this one is a definite exception. No wonder as the plants were supplied by Cistus!

    I also spy a beautiful lime green pot on the fourth from last pic :)

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    1. Oh yes, that container was gorgeous...and tall...and expensive...

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  12. That bark is awesome!!!!!! I asked Michael- he said it won't live here. And that corkscrew! Very cool! That parking lot setting was great- great combos!

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    1. I'm sorry...plant lust for those things you cannot grow is tough!

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  13. AnonymousJuly 23, 2013

    The flip side of growing Lyonothamnus is that they are messy year round and tend to catch and hold onto falling foliage and bark within the tree also. Some people object to the flowers also being retained and looking quite brown for months, but they are quite lovely when fresh. I've used these a fair amount in SF Bay Area gardens, and they're also used as street trees in San Francisco.
    David in Berkeley

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  14. Haha - I know that parking lot well! Every time I have to go to Linde's, I steal a few minutes in the nursery too. There is always something to admire!

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  15. The words bioswale and bio retention pond were found to be to scary here, so they are now called rain gardens to keep the public from getting frightened.

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