Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Wednesday Vignette — next year: more Cannas!

I've always had Cannas in my garden, always. My love for them has waxed and waned, but they've always been here. That is until this year. If you're just tuning in our winter was nasty. Cold, ice snow, ice, cold, snow, rain, rain, rain...on and on and on. Every single Canna up and froze or rotted, that is except this one. I believe it's Canna 'Durban', and it's living next to one of the only Phormium left standing in NE Portland and that crazy bit of Zone 10 Passiflora 'Sunburst' that keeps reappearing year after year. In other words a nice little warm spot in my garden. It's stunning presence has reminded me of just how much I miss those big dramatic leaves. Next summer I will plant more Cannas...

Weather Diary, Sept 5: Hi 91, Low 66/ Precip 0

Wednesday Vignettes are hosted by Anna at Flutter & Hum. All material © 2009-2017 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

25 comments:

  1. I never grew Cannas and always wanted to. Each year, in the waining days of summer, I spot them in gardens around town and promise to give this bold-statement plant a try. Your Canna 'Durban' is a fantastic motivator; I'll go see what they have in the West Seattle nursery. Or maybe I should wait for Spring?

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    1. You may find deals now, but then you'll have to get them through winter - not usually difficult but???

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  2. Gorgeous foliage! Can you dig and store for the winter?

    Here they always look a tad ratty--plenty warm, but too dry.

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    1. I could, but I won't. They've been fine in the ground for 11 of my 12 years here...that's odds I'm willing to risk again. I've already got enough prep for winter to do...

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  3. They've been missing from my garden this year too, but I can't rely on them coming back every spring, it doesn't seem to matter whether it's a harsh winter. I think I just need to start thinking of them as annuals, or grow them in pots and find space for them in the greenhouse.

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    1. Pots would be a great idea, I'm sorry they're already spotty survivors for you.

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  4. Love 'em! Many people even here in the north grow them in pots and mixed plantings (as annuals, or maybe they dig up the bulbs and replant them). If I had more sun, they would be in my garden. :)

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  5. It's a lovely combination! Maybe you can find other similarly protected microclimates in your garden? As Hoover Boo said, the problem with Cannas here is water and, in my garden at least, wind.

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    1. Sadly I don't think so, they were planted in good spots...this one is just magic.

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  6. Love the fabulous leaves of Durban! As for your madcap Passiflora - this is very encouraging. I planted one earlier called "Snow Queen'. It is said to be hardy to Zone 8, so I hold my hopes high. Maybe whomever wrote the tag for 'Sunburst' needs to re-evaluate? Or maybe it's just due to the perfect spot. I had things survive this winter I thought I would NEVER see again. I'll take a happy surprise whenever I can get it!

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    1. No I think the spot that bit of 'Sunburst' is in is just incredibly good. It's literally growing against the foundation of the house right under a single pane window. Glad you had some happy surprises.

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  7. I used to have drifts of cannas but the drought claimed most of them. All I have left is a clump of Canna musifolia in a large post. Strangely enough, it does very well with once-a-week watering.

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    1. They do need water, that's for sure. I had some in the front garden that I let drift away by not watering them. The were part of the earlier (doomed) Phormium and Cordyline planting scheme.

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  8. I have to admit I admire their foliage, even if I don't want to deal with cleaning them up when they die back for the winter. The one in your photo is particularly stunning. And the phormium! I'm teetering on the edge of risking phormiums again, though any attempts will have to wait until next spring.

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    1. I've never thought of their clean up as difficult, it's just a swift cut to the stalk with a sharp knife and done! Phormiums again huh? That's the spirit!

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  9. How nice that a few plants have given you a clue about the benefits of their location! I've never grown cannas either but they make such an incredible foliage and color contrast. I keep thinking I should give them a try. Hope your weather is improving. Your ash photos were very disturbing.

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    1. The ash fall has pretty much ended. Just a few tiny bits over the last 24 hours. The air quality is still horrid and anything much more than a block away is seen through a smokey haze.

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  10. I love cannas! they are beautiful indestructible plants, they don't mind the searing heat and excessive humidity, the two archenemies of my garden.

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    1. Your garden sounds like the perfect place for Canna!

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  11. We love our cannas down here. Ours die back to the ground, but come back from the roots each year. This year we're going to need to dig and divide many of ours this year. They are great plants! Definitely worth getting more.

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    1. That die-back/regrowth is what I've been used to too, but I've never actually divided mine!

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  12. Sorry you lost the rest of your cannas but it's swell that this one found that sweet micro climate in your garden.

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    1. Cannas in your garden...yes or no?

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  13. No luck here with Cannas here but man, are they impressive plants.

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