Friday, June 19, 2015

Brilliant and yet…

Yes, it's a terrible photo, but I had to include it so you could get a sense of the space. Chain-link fence at the far side of a residential property. Open field (Portland Public Schools property) on the other side. Big tree putting said fence in deep shade.

This is what I wanted to share. As an idea I like it. Disguise a chain-link fence, yes! But.

But...ferns  (shade and moisture lover)and Senecio (full sun and dry lover) together?

And why the different colors of stain? Wouldn't it have been better to pick one and go with it?

Did I mention ferns and Senecio!?

Personally I would have liked to see a shade-loving plant that would trail downward, and I would have stuck with the natural color stain - to coordinate with the wooden fence.

Although I do love the dark color.

There are a couple other sun lovers tucked in there too, next to other ferns. I am confused!

They were rather ingenious though, in how they went about it.

The attachment system is a work of art - clean and functional art.

Hopefully they won't be discouraged when some of their plants die...

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

20 comments:

  1. That is a clever way to attach the boxes to the fence. Maybe it's all an experiment? Maybe they're trying out different colors, like you do on a wall before you paint it, to see which one you like. I would definitely have chosen trailers too, or at least given the ferns a little head room.

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    1. I thought about that (trials) but what a lot of work to go to! And two of each color too. I think it was a conscious decision.

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  2. Beginning gardener. We were all there too, once upon a time.

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    1. And some of us (me!) are still making the beginner mistakes...

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  3. Well...they are trying! Got to give them credit for covering up a chain link fence...beginners for sure.

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    1. Indeed, I applaud their creativity!

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  4. Three shades of wood...although in a big installation it would cool. Someone's still finding their feet with gardening but it'll be a learning curve :)

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    1. "Three shades of wood"....there's a great title!

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  5. I remember thinking, not so long ago, that if one color is good, lots of colors would be even better. Who doesn't like color, right? Hopefully some of their plants will live and they'll be encouraged. My hat's off to anyone disguising a chain link fence.

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    1. I do hope some of their plants thrive, it's no fun to go to all that work just to watch them die.

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  6. Ah, the designers eye at work. Surely it can only be an experiment. I hope. Maybe some would think the same thing about the mish-mash of colors in my garden.

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    1. I don't think anyone could look at your garden and see anything but beauty.

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  7. At least they came up with a good idea. It just needs some refining. I can almost hear your incredulity at their plant combo, though. Hehe

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    1. Incredulity - yes I suppose. Also questioning and frustration. I could almost see them at Fred Meyer picking out plants. I swear I walked down the aisle and saw those very combos displayed together. What responsibility does the seller have in educating the buyer? I don't have the answers, just questions.

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  8. Clever approach, yes, (despite odd mix of plants) but I still prefer to cover chain link fences with vines. This has been so since Judy and I first lived together in a three flat and the landlord allowed us to plant morning glories on a chain link fence along the alley.

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  9. Odd. My guess, like your other commentators, is that its's an experiment to see what works.

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  10. Agreed. The black is cool, but so is the natural.. either way, one colour for the planters would've looked best. The way they've attached it is clever.

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  11. I freak seeing horticultural dyslexia...too common where I moved from, but even some here. The colors...at least they can redo the other.

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  12. A little bit of genius, a little bit of oops. It got your attention, then got us all talking...not too bad, for a beginner.

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  13. AnonymousJuly 09, 2015

    Pretty sure this was scrap wood and plants foraged from the John Day river basin... Focus on the genius side and be less critical. Great blog though...

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