Monday, May 4, 2015

An Early Morning Garden Stroll...

The morning was sunny and warm, a cup of of coffee and my camera and I was off to walk the garden...my first ever Libertia bloom! On L. ixioides 'Taupo Sunset'...

And my first ever Trachycarpus fortunei bloom...

I sacrificed Melianthus blooms this year because I cut the whole plant back to the ground, parts of it were overwintering but parts were toasted. It was pretty rangy, it's coming back strong.

Magnolia laevifolia has put on quite the show this year, I'm enjoying the final few blooms.

The shade garden in a moment of sunlight...

It's going to be an amazing year for Callistemon viridiflorus blooms. There are dozens and dozens forming.

Here you can see more of them as well as the Embothrium coccineum which continues it's successful march upwards. It's recovering from it's brief loss of leaves over the winter.

This is Clifford's awkward stage. His leaves are spaced for how big they will eventually become, but they aren't quite of that size yet.

The Rhododendron 'Ebony Pearl' is blooming for the first time. It's a horrible photo but at least you can see they're HOT pink not soft baby pink. I prefer that, if they had to be pink.

After all a strong pink can better hold up against orange.

I chose not to coppice the Paulownia tomentosa this year (center). It gets to grow on and help to block an unfortunate view. Eventually the Eriobotrya japonica and Daphniphyllum macropodum v. humile will handle that task.

Speaking of Daphniphyllum, watching the variegation develop on the D. himalaense ssp macropodum 'Variegated' is interesting. The new leaves start out bright yellow and then gradually the darker green bits take over.

Where as on the straight D. macropodum v. humile the new leaves start out with an almost brown tinge.

Said to be slow growing I think the Quercus dentata 'Pinnatifida’ put on about 5" of growth last year. Not bad!

I decided to run a wire up along one of our fence posts to support my Passiflora jamesonii 'Coral Seas', within about 20 minutes it had a firm hold on the bottom of the wire. Grow little guy grow!

A new plant in the garden this year, Ficus afghanistanica 'Silver Lyre'. I am very excited about this one!
I realize this is basically Gardening 101 but it still makes me happy. Last fall I collected seeds from the best performing Castor Bean and planted them up a few weeks ago. They're starting to hatch! There are 3 more in there since I took this photo.

Pseudopanax discolor, I saw it at Cistus last February and fell in love. I was going to take a chance on it in the ground but decided to put it in a container.

Pretty fabulous...

The sides came off the shade pavilion greenhouse later in the day (open season on summer!). It was supposed to happen last weekend but didn't. Better late than never! All the plants from the basement (the "not hardy" bunch) are back up on the patio and acclimating in the shade, that's why they're all pushed to the south side.

Even so last week's 82 degree and sunny day got a few of them, like my Aloe marlothii who's looking a little "tan"...hopefully he'll work his way out of it.

Spikes! (glowing in the sun)

This cute guy is waiting to be a part of a new agave mound. I'm pretty excited about it, but building will wait until I've planted most everything else, collecting the rocks I dig up helps to make a well draining mound.

In the meantime something has taken a bite out of his nice juicy new arm! (bastard)

Another first! A bloom on my Grevillea x gaudichaudii...

I decided to take the plunge this year and coughed up the dough for a BrazelBerries® Raspberry Shortcake™ (how annoying is that name?). I'm pretty excited for the possibilities.

My sugar snap peas on the other hand, they're really disappointing me. I'm afraid it's going to be time to rip them out and plant the tomatoes before I even get a bloom!

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

42 comments:

  1. I miss my morning garden strolls with coffee in hand...seeing the Trachy bloom its first time and the sunlit spikes makes it perfect.

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    1. I guess it doesn't take too long to stroll around your balcony does it? Maybe you can start strolling the neighborhood? People will talk...

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  2. What fun! The first walk around the garden in the morning is one of the best parts of the day, isn't it? The coffee is an essential accompaniment. Were you still in your nightie? The first picture really got to me. Libertia is a plant I've never even heard of, I liked the red stems and contrasting bright white flowers.

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    1. Well I was in my pj's, but nothing as lady-like as a nightie. I'm of the cotton pj-bottoms, t-shirt class.

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  3. I agree with Jane, a morning garden stroll is the best way to start a day! Coffee and camera? You are a talented woman! Your garden is looking great as always! Hooray for the shade pavilion walls coming down and three cheers for your first Grevillea x gaudichaudii bloom! It's going to be a fabulous summer!

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    1. And I didn't drop the camera OR dump my coffee! You're right...it is going to be a fabulous summer...

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  4. Great tour. I'm surprised at how long you keep your tenders in the basement. It's a lesson for over-anxious me, I paid the price this (my first overwintering) year. The hot pink rhodie is a surprise indeed, as you say, at least it's hot hot hot!

    Looking forward to the agave mound. What could have taken a chunk out of his arm?

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    1. They actually came out on April 19th, but I haven't been inspired to do anything with them until the shade pavilion was open. Several trickled out ahead of that 19th date too. I was just dragging my heals or else they would have been out earlier.

      I think it must have been a slug. Or a tiny, hungry, alien.

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  5. Your plants are doing lots of great things!! Wow that Pseudopanax! and the opuntia!

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    1. I could stare at that Pseudopanax for hours...

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  6. Morning tours are my favorite. Melianthus looks much better cut back. You done good. Yes, that Pseudopanax...

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    1. It would probably be very happy in your garden, and Cistus does mail-order...

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  7. Such fun blooms! D. himalaense ssp macropodum 'Variegated' is too cool. Looking forward to seeing the agave mound. Hope the bite heals on the cacti arm!

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    1. I might just amputate, depending on how it heals.

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  8. Once again, an absolute delight to see your garden! And I felt transported to, back to Portland having a stroll around your garden :) that Paulownia should do the job nicely in providing a screen, and come winter the Daphniphyllum will provide the evergreen screen and interest.

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    1. Hopefully you'll be here again in person someday...

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  9. Grevillea x guadichuadii's size scared me off but I may need to reconsider. I hope 'Raspberry Shortcake' works for you up there - it didn't like the dry conditions here AT ALL.

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    1. I guess that's a benefit to knowing it won't last a real cold winter, I didn't even consider that Grevillea's eventual size.

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  10. Beautiful flowers and foliage now and anticipation of more to come. I can't wait to see it in person!

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    1. I almost invited you to stop by on Saturday after Patricia's, but I had a nasty headache and wouldn't have been a good hostess. Soon!

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  11. There is something special about wondering slowly through the garden in the morning. Your garden is looking great for this early int he year.

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    1. It's been a great year so far, off to an early start. Here's hoping for lots of nice nighttime rain showers and sunny days!

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  12. I remember last year there was a lot of smack-talk about the BrazelBerries raspberry! I have one that I bought last year, and I like it. It suckers (it's in a 2 foot diameter stock tank planter to accommodate that) but it doesn't make long canes and it IS thornless. It produced a pretty decent amount of fruit last year and looks to do better this year. :-) Good luck with yours! PS--this year it is filling the container.

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    1. All good to know Emily, thank you! When did you do a heavy prune of last years canes?

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    2. I did not prune. With the warm spring and all, I got confused about when/if I should do it and then I didn't. The way it has behaved, though, I think maybe you don't need to prune out the old canes? IDK. Looks like it's flowering on both old and new...

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  13. I like that the castor beans seeds "hatched" -- they're not that big! Remember not to let them get very pot-bound or they'll be slow when you put them into the ground. (ground-planted castor bean seeds seems to do better IMO) You're going to need to string a few more wires when the Maypop I'll be digging up for you arrives.

    BTW, from the sunlight intensity/angle I see you're not a "crack of dawn" garden stroller. :)

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    1. I first read your advice as "remember to let them get very pot-bound..." and thought what!? Okay will do. I thought about tucking a few in the ground but it's been so dry here and I would have forgotten to water them. Putting them in a container was a memory device.

      A Maypop from you? Really? YAY! Looking forward to that. And really, 8:30 am doesn't count as "crack of dawn"???

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  14. Ooo, I bet that bite was caused by a slug! I've caught them in the act on some of mine, and they leave a big hole like that. On a happier note, I really enjoy morning strolls that reveal new blooms too! That Callistemon of yours is impressive! Just this morning, I noticed a brand new Watsonia gladioloides bloom in my garden. I've been waiting years for that to happen!

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    1. Nasty slugs! I had to Google "Watsonia gladioloides" but can see why you're excited, that's a nice one!

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  15. Your garden looks beautiful and I am sure your visitors will love it. I am too far away or I would certainly be there.Absolutely wonderful! Such pics! I'm so impressed, and enjoy every photo. Have a nice week

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  16. Wow, your collection of plants in containers is impressive all set out in one place! I bought the same obnoxiously-named raspberry plant last year (with a gulp at the price), and it has been a good producer so far. So nice to have raspberries growing in our yard without worrying about thorns or spreading.

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    1. And there were even more containers still inside the shade pavilion, it's kind of an addiction. When I spotted said raspberry at Fred Meyer for about $8 less than I saw it for anywhere last year I decided to just do it. Glad to know you too have had good experiences with it.

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  17. My garden overall is definitely not your cup of tea, but you'll appreciate my Palm, aka, the big name you referred to yours as, that I'll never remember. ;)
    http://rindymae.blogspot.com/2015/04/the-backyard-42315.html
    I love that you're excited about your first flower, and I'm considering going after mine with a hand saw....

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    1. You'd be surprised Mindy, I love pretty much all gardens tended by people with passion. I love the shot of the palm leaves and the lilac and your sedum/sempervivum bowl is fabulous. Is it setting on a real wood base or is that faux? As for the palm it looks to be about the same size as my neighbors and yes, what a mess! I can't believe you'd be happy if it was gone though. Did you plant it?

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  18. We spent all day Sunday hauling my plants out of the greenhouse. I was wondering as I did it what you did to acclimate yours. Cause there was no way I was going to haul all that in and out every day, a la hardening off. So, some of yours spend some time in the shade. I was glad to read that, cause that's basically what I did. My Callistemon 'Woodlander's Hardy' is going to be covered in flowers this year too. I'm really looking forward to that.

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    1. My favorite time to bring the plants out is when there's a week of cloudy days predicted, then I don't have to do a thing! Of course every year there's something that gets burned, no matter how much I try to be careful.

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  19. How exciting to bring them all up into daylight after so long the basement - I hope it caused you to celebrate! I often sneak out early mornings with coffee in hand, dreaming of all the grand things I will accomplish on my next day off. I almost invariably fail to do even half of it, but hey.... a girl can dream - right? And that moment of solace in the slanted sun, anything is possible!

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    1. I'm sure your not alone in having bigger plans than time allows, that's how my mind works most of the time too!

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  20. How fun is it that we get to see your garden at the crack of dawn (yes, 8:30 definitely qualifies) and with you still in your jammies.

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  21. Everything looks so good! I especially like both Daphniphyllums and Clifford. All things I need in my own garden. I've been eyeing the Magnolia macrophyllas at work, and the loquats, and...

    I'm so excited for the Grevillea x gaudichaudii! I need to visit so I can see it in person! I'm planning to add dwarf blueberries to the Acer griseum bed. Either Tophat or one of the BrazzelBerry blueberries, if I can stomach the name. Kind of hoping I find Tophat first.

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  22. Your shade pavilion is so cool! Did you design it yourself? Very impressive. I didn't realize you had so much patio space! Great for pots. Lots of pots!
    Lookin' good!

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