Monday, April 6, 2015

Rediscovering a drive-by garden

I rediscovered this garden in much the same manner that I initially did, took a wrong turn and there I was. It’s gotten a lot greener than when I first saw it, back then the rusty metal was the prime feature. Now there’s lots of plants…

And nice gravel work.

If I were asked to critique the design I think my only gripe would be the plant chosen for the corner feature. It could have been so much more interesting than the bamboo.

I love the patterns of the leaves and berries on the other side of the translucent panels.

The parking strips are both done very well. Lots of open space for feet, lots of interest for eyes.

Have you noticed the number of euphorbia? I certainly happened by at the right time to enjoy their chartreuse blooms.

Raised metal boxes for veggies, in the distance on the other side of the driveway.

Soon to be planted up I’m sure.

It’s safe to say the euphorbia make this garden.

Well and that amazing manzanita certainly helps...

All material © 2009-2015 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

37 comments:

  1. I checked out your previous post and wow! It is so much more lush with plants now than when it was new. Those Euphorbia flowers really pop. The Manzanita could maybe be pruned just a bit to show off the branches more.

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    1. The manzanita was more striking in person, I think it's my photography skills that make it seem that it needs to be pruned.

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  2. Oh my gosh, where is this incredible place? Nice photos, Loree. I'd like to check it out. Someday to have raised beds with the rusted metal would be nice.

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    1. It's along the Alameda ridge, to the east of 42nd. That's the best I can do, I didn't think to look at the street signs!

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  3. Alison's right, the change is amazing. Just shows how much plants love our climate and how much gardens change with time. Love this garden!

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    1. Me too. And I still want to see behind that wall.

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  4. Great design! I like the contrast between the plants and the hardscape. And I always like euphorbias and manzanitas :) It is looking awesome now that the plants have grown.

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    1. Indeed. The plants and the hardscape strike the perfect balance.

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  5. OMG, those panels, that rusty backdrop, that gate -- love it! I think the corner bamboo is in the awkward teen years, when it's not quite mature enough to make a statement. If they plan on keeping it this height by pruning a variety with larger leaves would have been better, but if it's going to get taller and have some impressive exposed culms down below it could have the impact you want.

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    1. You're right. The exposed culms against the rusty backdrop would be lovely.

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  6. oh that's fun- we just rediscovered the same yard too! I've never seen fencing that utilizes translucent panels like this.

    Thanks for taking the time to point out the lovely plant details. I didn't take the time to look past the bamboo.

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    1. Thanks for commenting Jocelyn!

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  7. I absolutely love translucent panels. I can't remember when I first saw them in garden photos but, ever since, I've wondered how they could be incorporated into my own garden. This example is fabulous (not a word I use often but deserved in this case). Maybe that's what I should add along the street where my hedge died...

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    1. That's a great idea Kris. They'd provide privacy yet still let in light.

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  8. Is there anything better than CorTen steel and translucent panels? If money were no object, I'd completely transform my yard with those materials--and have a cleaning service to keep the panels pristine.

    I quite like the bamboo, actually. No surprise, eh?

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    1. No surprise indeed. I wish money were no object, I'd love to see that version of your garden.

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  9. Wowza. Oh, to have the discipline to repeat the same plant that many times . . .

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  10. The plants behind the translucent panels seem to be saying let me out : ) The chartreuse shades of the euphorbia flowers is great. I agree about the bamboo...to messy. I love the contrast of the rusted metal and the green plantings. Very striking modern design.

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    1. They do have a rather captive look, as seen through the panels.

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  11. Really pretty. I was going to ask why the sidewalks were all wet--I thought they were hosed down. Then I realized the street was wet also and then I realized it still rains in other parts of the world.

    But really pretty property, well done, well cared for. Thanks for the re-visit. I've been meaning to got back and look at some properties I blogged about a few years back. Some of them look good,most dreadful. None look as good as the one in this post!

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    1. It was quite a rainy day, and I do wish we could share with you. I need more dry days to get some garden projects complete.

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  12. This is really gorgeous! Any idea what that vine is?

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    1. It's Clematis armandii, a great easy to care for plant.

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  13. At first glance I thought this was an Australian garden -- those design elements, plants and materials are very popular in the temperate areas of SE Aust at the moment.
    As for the vine... The elongated leaves and twisty stems look like a Hardenbergia to me, but the flowers are more like Trachelospermum jasminoides (star jasmine) which has a smaller, rounder leaf. Hardenbergia flowers in winter/spring, star jasmine in late summer/autumn. Perhaps we're looking at a combination of both?

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    1. A touch of Australia in NE Portland! I love your combo idea but I think it's just Clematis armandii.

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  14. That is an exciting garden--in so many ways! It's not even my "style" of garden, but I really like it. It's clean and colorful and warm.

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    1. So many people would think the metal cold, even with the rust. I'm glad you saw the garden as warm.

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  15. How splendid ! That Clem armandii cascading over the cor-ten panels , meeting up with the Euphorbias is just inspired. My garden style is way too sloppy for a disciplined approach like this , but I love it .The treatment of the Manzanita as a specimen, the rock work, the mysterious view of plants against the panels...so well done! You need to go back in mid-summer and give us an update Loree !

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    1. I had the same thought..."I could never have a garden like this because I'd have to stick in random one's everywhere!"...ah well. At least there are gardens like this that you and I can appreciate. I will try to remember to re-visit in the summer months!

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  16. Breathtaking. Love the unity of the color palette, how all the material plays well off the rusted metal, and how perfectly the plants have grown into the space. I'm curious what provides the color and interest when the euphorbia isn't blooming....I'm thinking the grasses and bamboo step up and take the lead....

    I'd love it if there was a secondary "showy" plant to alternate with the euphorbia.

    All around, a knock-out garden!

    Thanks for sharing, Danger Garden!

    Tara
    www.GalleryofShea.com

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  17. What a difference a few years make. I think the garden is stunning. Someone clearly had a vision and it worked. Love the bamboo, messes can be cleaned up. Glad you made a wrong turn, I really enjoyed seeing this one!

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    1. I'll try to remember to turn again, during the summer. I am curious what it will look like when the euphorbia are done with their show.

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  18. We usually see installations of Cor10 when it is newly installed and rather raw looking. Nice to see it on a return visit. I'm dealing with too much cutting back of Euphorbia, so am slightly jaded in my appreciation of how lovely it is.

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    1. Oh...thanks for the reminder. The Euphorbia rigida needs to be cut back before too many seeds take flight.

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  19. This place always looks good. The new owners have kept up with the original vision and maintained it well!

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