Thursday, December 4, 2014

Kuzma Garden 2014, Part 1

My traditional yearly post on this special garden feels a little different this year, perhaps because over the summer I shared this garden with 80 other Garden Bloggers during our annual "Fling," held this year in Portland.

For that visit instead of blue skies they were grey, and rain fell. The garden had a very different feel that day...

I'll never look at this combo the same way again - that Fatsia japonica 'Spider's Web' was one of the "it" plants of the Fling.

Truth be told I've been lucky enough to visit this garden so many times now it almost feels like it's a bit mine. I know the paths and the plants, I check on them to see how they've grown, feeling a touch of ownership.

After all they're all plants I'd be happy to have in my own garden.

My Anigozanthos (kangaroo paw) didn't look as good this year. This one is amazing...

Okay enough chatter, how about I just share the photos?...

Looking back into the courtyard from the drive-way...

On the other side of the drive...

And having walked through the side yard we're about to step into the back garden...

Nerium oleander, variegated

Beautiful!

Tempting but we won't take those stairs to the upper garden quite yet...

To be continued tomorrow...

All material © 2009-2014 by Loree Bohl for danger garden. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited and just plain rude.

33 comments:

  1. So nice to see this garden with blue skies! Although it looked great with grey skies and wet plants too :)

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    1. I barely remember the garden that day (other than the rain), mind was on the "bigger" picture I'm afraid...

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  2. Loree these are amazing photos. Where did you get the blue sky? :)

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    1. I guess I forgot to mention these photos were taken September 3rd?

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  3. Beautiful! And isn't it amazing how we "own" a garden that's not ours at all, yet we care for it with such passion!

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    1. Yes! I actually have a few gardens around town...

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  4. I missed this garden when it was open for HPSO, so I contacted the owner and he was nice enought to give me a private tour on a warm summer evening - glass of red wine included!

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    1. Get out! Lucky you, that's wonderful.

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  5. I quite enjoyed John's garden at the Fling, even in the rain. It's nice to see it again under blue skies. This can't be how it looks right now, though, right?

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    1. No, sadly it's not. This visit was in early September, although I was back in late October and it was still fabulous, under grey skies again...

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  6. Love your yearly post about this garden. It was a pleasure to see it in person- so many great plants!

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    1. I am so glad you came to the Fling this year, and will miss you next.

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  7. This garden impressed me with its quiet sense of spaciousness despite being filled with interesting plants at every turn, a wonderful strolling garden. I love seeing the yearly continuity of its development.

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    1. If my math is correct I visited this garden 6 times this year, seeing the changes just from May to October was amazing.

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  8. That courtyard just gets better and better; it's my favorite part of the garden. I very much appreciate the chance you and the garden owner & designer have given us to see the whole garden develop.

    But the last couple of pictures brought me up short. It's that big variegated Phalaris. That scale of very bright foliage is just too much for me -- even if it stayed put. But it's also one of the most rampageous plants there is; doesn't more than half of it have to be dug out of the container each year?

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    1. Glad you've enjoyed the posts over the years. It's tough work chronicling this garden but I do my best...

      The variegated Phalaris is actually Arundo donax and is planted in the ground. Much less rampageous than ribbon grass, in my experience.

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    2. Arundo donax not rampageous? (nice word!) Sounds like you're ready to put some running bamboos into the ground... ;)

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    3. Sure, bring it on! No.

      I should have been more specific. The variegation and our PNW climate combine to keep this plant relatively in check here. For others opinions on the subject:
      http://plantlust.com/plants/arundo-donax-peppermint-stick/

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    4. Thanks for the clarification, Loree. That is a lot of chlorophyll-less area on the foliage, which is bound to help slow it down. But in the North Carolina climate, particularly in the sandier areas, I'd expect it to be a big job to keep Arundo donax 'Peppermint Stick' in bounds. Will see what staff are willing to say at PD next season...

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  9. I appreciate you're taking us along for your stroll. I can see why this garden is so special to you - it's beautiful. It not only has great structure but also extraordinary plants.

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  10. This garden is so fabulous. I would love to see it! Is it usually open during the year under HPSO auspices? Very impressed with the layering and the open spaces. Thanks for sharing, especially on such a cold, wet and gloomy day as today.

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    1. Today was pretty ugly wasn't it? This August was the first time he opened for the HPSO but I believe it was a good experience for him and hopefully he'll repeat next year! Maybe for one of those nice Monday evening opens they do.

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  11. I LOVED this garden!! actually I liked a lot how it looked with the rain and the gray sky. It made the color of the plants pop!

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    1. I'm glad your experience wasn't dampened by the weather.

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  12. Great post, awesome garden. What was that glaucus rhododendron looking thing in the third photo?

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    1. Ugh, I never can remember the name. It is a rhododendron. Let me see if I can track it down...

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  13. Did you wear a trash bag on this visit anyway, just for old time's sake? ;)

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    1. I should have tucked a few into my photos to see if you all would have gotten the joke.

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  14. I was blown away when you said this garden was in Portland!!! Not knowing it's history it's hard to imagine what extraordinary measures are surely necessary to keep it looking like this. It's such a tasty blend of hard exotics and the no so hardy. It could be my dream garden. Well, almost. I would need Leucadendrons for that. Sigh....Thanks so much for sharing this. I'll need to go back and find some of your past years blogs on this garden.

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  15. Such wonderful use of negative space.

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  16. A wonderful garden indeed! I especially remembering coveting his Acacias, but I know for sure that I would never be able to commit to the work involved in keeping them alive over the winter - however much I would tell myself that my intentions were true! I agree with Lisa - I thoroughly enjoyed this garden in the rain, but love seeing your sunny photos too!

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  17. Nice day and a nice garden to catch. Like a larger, but equally dangerous garden.

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