Thursday, September 20, 2012

More talk of trees…


One morning last week Andrew came home from a dog walk with a request for tree identification. He had noticed, and been impressed by, a particularly large specimen nearby. Never one to boast of my tree knowledge I set off with camera in hand figuring the collective wisdom of my readers would be able to identify the tree if I could not.

But I think I know what this is…a Walnut, maybe more accurately a Black Walnut…what do you think?

I looked for it on the Concordia Street Tree Inventory map, but since it technically isn’t a street tree it isn’t listed. I did learn that my neighborhood has 4,636 street trees, made up of 82 types. The most common of which is the Maple (23%), followed by the Cherry (9.4%), and the Dogwood (7.5%). All in all 10 tree "types" make up 70% of the total...and broadleaf deciduous trees account for 96% of all my neighborhood street trees (info pulled from this map, shown below).

Volunteers in Portland have completed a tree inventory in 6 Portland neighborhoods, there were 3 more neighborhoods counted this summer for which data is not yet available. Applications for the 2013 neighborhood inventories are due January 15th, 2013, if you’re here in Portland and want to learn more visit this page.

30 comments:

  1. Oh my, I recognized it immediately. Our neighbors have one that hangs over our property. Not only is it prone to losing branches but it is very annoying this time of year when it drops its huge hard walnuts on our car, house, and property. I feel certain we'll one day break a bone after stepping on one of them in the dark. The tree pictured is much lovelier though!

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    1. Oh that sounds horrible Sandy! I could tell just looking at those fruits that they must be heavy.

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    2. @Sandy, just walk careful...Trees take ages to grow, some many human lives. ..We need every single tree on this planet in order to survive (Google it.)as the deforestation is in dramatic incline...

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  2. I think you're right. I have admired a few of those round town myself.

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    1. Easier to admire on someone else s property right?

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  3. They also leech a toxic chemical that kills most all plants

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    1. Thanks! I remember reading that once upon a time.

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  4. I'd have to say, yes, definitely a Walnut tree, potentially a Black Walnut.

    Makes me miss the one that used to be in my parents' yard (the prior owners of that particular section took it down before my parents bought the property). We used to collect the walnuts for my grandfather who would hull them for the family.

    And yes, while they do tend to exude *something* into the soil around them, you can grow other plants, even trees in their vicinity. Most particularly, Pin Oaks, judging by the ones growing around the offspiring of the Black Walnut back home.}:P And grass, obviously.

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    1. For just a moment I read that your grandfather would hurl them at the family, which wouldn't be very nice would it?

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  5. Sure looks like it. I have one in each neighbor's yard, but by carefully choosing native plants (there are plenty of juglone-resistant plants, natives seem to fare better), I've been fine near the closest tree. Also, the neighbor trims it so the walnuts don't fall on my house and car. (I've heard they can break a windshield). I worry more about the years to come when the other two trees encroach over my vegetable garden. Tomatoes are especially sussceptible to juglone.

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    1. Good that you've got a considerate neighbor!

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  6. I never knew there was a tree inventory!

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    1. I wonder if there's one in your city?

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  7. Thanks for that great link. I've bookmarked it for future reference/tree-oriented walks. I want to lean on your walnut tree: the bark is somehow very friendly looking.

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    1. Oh good, I was hoping somebody would find that link useful! I'm sure the tree would love for you to lean on it, or picnic under it even. I'd be happy to tell you the location...

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  8. I love that people do a tree inventory. That's a great idea. I wish more communities did more of this. I've never heard of this before. I wonder if Tucson does one. The tree looks like the one growing in my grandparents yard. Beautiful. But what a mess in fall. The squirrels love to bury the nuts all over the place!

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    1. Isn't it cool? We saw them counting and measuring in our neighborhood and asked what they were up to. Speaking of squirrels I dug a partially buried peanut in an agave container on the patio yesterday. I bet it regretted even trying!

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  9. Do you think maybe Andrew wants to replace that Hydrangea with one?

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    1. Oh not a chance...he's pretty anti-tree actually. Driving east on I-84 he gets very happy when we hit the open space and leave the trees behind.

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  10. What a great old tree. Yes, looks like a Walnut, probably Black Walnut to me. I love the idea of a tree map.

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    1. Me too, sometimes I just love Portland.

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  11. Yikes! If your hubby plants one, don't plant any veggies in the ground close by. It does look pretty in that field though!

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    1. And that's exactly where it should be, in the field. No worries, there will not be one going in around here!

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  12. Pretty tree, but I'm most impressed by the tree inventory. I don't even have a tree inventory of my own yard, let alone a neighborhood or city.

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  13. Yup, walnut. They shed their catkins all over the place in the spring but the sound of the squirrels chomping at them in the branches this time of year is kind of fun. However, the chewed-up bits of hull all over the palce can be a pain and the little varmits plant them in all my beds - Anyone want some walnut saplings? They grow really fast! Because of something in the hull, the squirrels' mouths get stained a yellow/amber color & gives them an interesting look (like rabid!)

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    1. Sounds like the chatter/mess that goes on back by the Hazelnut that hangs over our property. Thankfully no strange colors though.

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  14. I have to say, that if you do become interested in trees, esp fruit/nut/wildlife trees, this company is a great resource.

    I used to get their catalogs when I was in Michigan. I think your climate would be amenable for many of these. The ones I was most interested in where the precocious hazelnuts. Small trees/shrubs with yummy nuts! Win/win!

    http://www.oikostreecrops.com/store/home.asp

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    1. Thank you Jenn, you can never have too many good resources! Perhaps they should be on plant lust!?

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  15. Tree inventory, wonderful idea. Portland is cool.

    There are many trees I admire...on someone else's property!

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