Tuesday, September 11, 2012

A late summer visit to Cistus Nursery...

I recently made a visit to Cistus Nursery "armed" with purpose (not that anyone ever needs a reason to visit ...“just because”...is perfectly good enough), why? Well word was a Clematis tibetana var. vernayi was waiting for me there…my second try at growing this lovely plant. Of course before I got down to business I first needed to tour through the place, and see what’s new and looking especially good.

First stop, to visit my prickly friends…

Aren’t they all looking wonderful?

Then of course I had to stop and stare at the Eucalyptus.

And appreciate some Erygium blooms.

Finally into the nursery!

First stop, Agave-land!

Don’t you love it when the little pups start growing out the bottom of the container? Sure it’s a little difficult to get them out safely but it just makes me smile...they're bursting with life!

Lush!

One of my fav’s from my brother’s garden in Phoenix; Oleander...

This one is Nerium oleander ‘Hardy White’…the hardiest of the oleander clones in cultivation...

Here’s a plant I’ve been tempted by time and time again, Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘James Stirling’…

Grevillea juniperina 'Molonglo'…I can’t say enough good things about this plant LOVE IT! When they say 2 ft tall x 10 ft wide they aren’t kidding. Just a year and a half in my garden and I think they’re just about there.

And the flowers are pretty wonderful too…

Gotta love a green so bright it almost hurts your eyes…

I’ve got a thing for Restios and the like, no doubt about it. This one is Thamnochortus insignis.

More green jungle lushness…

A serious object of my “Restio” affection, Rhodocoma capensis. Can you even guess how many times I’ve picked this up, and then set it back down again? No, you’re wrong. Add 10.

Have I mentioned what a beautiful day it was? Just beautiful day number 47! (or something like that, we’ve had so many sunny wonderful days that I’ve lost count...)

Louis, these Cordyline shots are for you…

What was once a sort of abandoned corner of the main nursery building is now a nicely decked out spot to relax…

I think it’s going to be a great spot to gravitate to on a grey winter’s day. I wonder if they’ll mind if I show up early with a thermos of coffee and a stack of books? Or maybe a little later in the afternoon with a bottle of wine?


Word is eventually they may be having a class or two in this corner!

It also looks like the perfect place for a couple to sit down and discuss which one of these lovely Cycads they should purchase.

I’m kind of obsessing about this Phoenix canariensis, after all I still haven’t bought my Christmas palm tree…

Moving on…over to the succulent side of things.

And finally it’s time to go behind the scenes and try to locate Mr. Hogan...

First though let’s ogle this lovely tree fern, maybe a Dicksonia squarrosa? I’m sorry I can’t remember for sure…

I didn’t get the name of this Agave but it could be the Agave version of Yucca ‘Bright Star’…

And this one…perhaps Agave schidigera? Beautiful…

Flower break!

Okay…right there is where I want to spend January.
Well…here’s where I started talking and stopped taking pictures, hopefully that was enough to tide you over until next time. Oh and here…

Is my new Clematis tibetana var. vernayi…so excited to get to try it again...thank you Sean!

Here’s a picture of last year’s October bloom… on the dearly departed first plant.

God I hope I have better luck this time!

34 comments:

  1. Yay!!!!! I'm sending good thoughts for your new Clematis! Be warned, however, as you've seen, they can be thuggish once they've settled in ;-)

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    1. Yes yours does demonstrate a certain desire to take over the world...hopefully I will be as lucky!

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  2. Good luck with your second Clematis tibetana. Keeping my fingers crossed for this one. I love that great seating area. I would be right there beside you with my books and coffee. And thanks for this great trip around Cistus. It is such a unique nursery.

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    1. Alison next summer you've got to make the trip down to Portland to visit...you'd love it!

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  3. Fascinating nursery with such amazing variety in their selections. They even have Santolina 'Lemon Fizz' which is the current object of my own plant lust. It does look like a great place to relax and the new greenhouse corner does look very inviting. The plants are stunning and the setting is comfortable.

    Gorgeous flower on your clematis with the center looking like a chocolate confection.

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    1. Too bad you're not closer and you can't just pop in for a visit, and pick up a few Santolina 'Lemon Fizz' while you're at it!

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  4. Well done on finally getting that Clematis, even though it's your second try you might be lucky this time. Must include Cistus Nursery on to our itinerary for when we actually get to your neck of the woods. And that decked area looks, strangely enough, inviting and relaxing despite being inside a polytunnel.

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    1. Thank you guys...and yes, you really must include Cistus on your list. With a little notice I'm sure you could get the extra special tour too!

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  5. * sigh * I LOVE pretty much everything I see there. Thanks for the cordyline shots, that was a treat!!!! One day I will have big red cordylines again! But I am still in shock with how amazing that looks there. Phoenix Canariensis is amazing! eventually they will get too monstrous to care for. I plan on taking mine to a sheltered spot in the gulf islands when that happens. Until then I will love love love it!!!!!

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    1. Yes one day you will...even if it involves moving? I think the Phoenix Canariensis is in serious contention as the Christmas Palm, those branches are perfect for my vintage ornaments!

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  6. Always love visiting Cistus through your lens. I don't think my eyes are as discerning as yours, because you always show something that amazes me, even though I visit regularly. I hope your Clematis thrives wonderfully, though I think you're brave to plant it in fall...but that just serves to illustrate what I DON'T know about clematis!

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    1. What I DO know about Clematis you could count on one hand and still have four fingers and a thumb left empty. So in other words...maybe I shouldn't? Actually truth be told since bringing it home I've been feeling inspiration to finally take out the Hydrangea and re-work that area, the Clematis would be a star on a trellis that divides the space. The only question remains do it in the fall (assuming we have a nice long warm one) or wait until spring? In which case the Clematis would be planted up in a nice sturdy container for the winter.

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  7. Thanks Loree for this fabulous visual treat! I love Cistus and can't wait to visit again. So many temptations; so little space. I saw a leaf of Solanum quitoense in the first cordyline shot. Maybe I'll let my big one stay outside this winter and start with a small one from Cistus in the spring.

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    1. Any plans for a fall visit? Yes that Solanum quitoense was quite the looker...if you're hoping to avoid hauling around a heavy pot that sounds like a good idea!

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  8. curly agave..cool great pics

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  9. That's certainly bamboo in the wide shot early on in the post, isn't it? Nary a mention. Boo!

    But you talked about Rhodocoma capensis, so that makes up for it. I still want to get one of these and overwinter in the garage. I'd buy it in a second if I could find it locally. Perhaps I need to email Cistus again...

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    1. Bamboo? Where? I didn't notice any bamboo...

      Ha. Yes the whole west (?) side of the nursery has a lovely wall of bamboo. You used to be able to walk down the drive, lined on both sides, but they closed that off a couple of years ago.

      Yes...I do think they had smaller Rhodocoma capensis...email!

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  10. YEah!!! These are my plants!! I love all things cacti....I'd miss not be able to have them in my garden....and if I live in colder temps, I'd have them in pots all over my house...but they are sticky devils aren't they? Good way to keep unwanted people out:) Love the plants....the nursery looks a bit untame:)

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  11. Wonderful eye candy! I want one of each LOL

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    1. Yikes...I think you're even more addicted than I!

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  12. Cistus is going to a major destination of my next Portland visit, for sure!

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    1. And when is that visit going to be?

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  13. It was nice of Sean to save you one.

    Yes, the weather has been wonderful. It was nice to have a little drizzle yesterday morning but this morning it was pure sunshine and blue sky once again. What's not to love about Oregon summers?

    I bought the pink flowered hardy Nerium oleander a few months ago at Fry Road. It's doing beautifully, almost doubling in size and lots of flowers. I love the foliage and hope it will survive the winter. Supposedly it's survived down to 5 degrees so we shall see.

    I also got the dark-leaved Cordy from Fry Road too. It was a freebie. Mine is about 3 feet tall. It will definitely come in for the winter.

    Love that January chair amid the jungle!

    I want a tree fern. NOW.

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    1. Did you get actual drizzle? I didn't see any here, and the pavement wasn't even wet under the trees. Not that I'm complaining...as I am still loving the break from wet.

      You probably need a tree fern, NOW.

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  14. Oh Oleander.....It makes me think of my Grandmother who was the gardener in my family. She had one planted in a five gallon bucket that she would winter over in the shed in Texas. It was about 7 feet tall and had beautiful pink blooms. OMG she loved that tree more than any other plant she grew. I think my Grandfather hated that tree cause he had to move it out on the porch in Spring and back to the shed late Autumn. Thanks for the thought!

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    1. I am so glad to have sparked a Grandmother memory! Thank you for sharing it.

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  15. what a wonderful nursery, i wish i could visit it one time, but being in australia there is a bit of a distance issue :) LOL

    a lot of the nurseries around my house don't have such a massive collection of such a variety of plants, just amazing.

    thanks for the tour around there nursery :)

    and good luck with the Clematis tibetana var. vernayi

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    1. Oh you never know Michael, maybe one day you will find your self in Portland, Oregon and remember..."oh I must visit Cistus!"...at least I hope so!

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  16. I'm wavering over pot?/ground? for a few very special acquisitions. What to do? Do tell us which you choose for your new clematis. I, for one, could be swayed by your decision. But then look out if we have another of those killer winters.

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    1. So I'm curious about your pot/ground thoughts on the killer winters. Are you thinking pot is better because you can move it to safety? Or ground is better for the extra insulation?

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  17. Isn't it funny how, in one area, Nerium oleander can be an "exciting" plant, whereas here, it's so common, I don't want one in my garden? Your new Clematis tibetana var. vernayi would be a standout anywhere though! Good luck with it, I also would like to know what you end up doing with it this fall/winter.

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    1. Oh so true...like certain folks love of conifers which I can't be bothered with! I'll be sure to update you all on what happens with the Clematis...

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